federal law Photos on Townhall

  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 2:24:50 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 2:24:50 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:33:07 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:33:07 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:33:07 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:25:18 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:25:18 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:25:18 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:07:11 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Rev. Al Sharpton attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

    Posted: 2/27/2013 12:07:11 PM EST
    U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) and Rev. Al Sharpton (2nd L) attend a voter's rights rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington February 27, 2013. The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider whether to strike down a key provision of a federal law designed to protect minority voters. During the one-hour oral argument, the nine justices will hear the claim made by officials from Shelby County, Alabama, that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is no longer needed. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  - 
              This handout photo provided by the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), taken in Feb. 2010, shows training activities at the indoor range Glynco, Ga. Yes, it's true, the gov

    This handout photo provided by the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), taken in Feb. 2010, shows training activities at the indoor range Glynco, Ga. Yes, it's true, the gov

    Posted: 2/14/2013 2:13:29 PM EST
    This handout photo provided by the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), taken in Feb. 2010, shows training activities at the indoor range Glynco, Ga. Yes, it's true, the government is buying ammo big time. No, it's not to take up arms against the people, as an online conspiracy buzz has it. The Homeland Security Department is ordering more than 1.6 billion rounds over the next four or five years, roughly the equivalent of five bullets for every person in the U.S. But the cache is for training agents and regular law enforcement, nothing sinister, officials say. (AP Photo/FLETC)
  •  - 
              California State Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, right, is seen after Gov. Jerry Brown, delivered his State of the State address at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, J

    California State Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, right, is seen after Gov. Jerry Brown, delivered his State of the State address at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, J

    Posted: 1/24/2013 4:03:30 PM EST
    California State Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, right, is seen after Gov. Jerry Brown, delivered his State of the State address at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, Jan. 23, 2013. Millions of smokers could be priced out of health insurance because of tobacco penalties in President Barack Obama’s health care law, say experts who are just now teasing out the potential impact of an overlooked provision in the massive legislation. “We don’t want to create barriers for people to get health care coverage,” said California state Assemblyman Richard Pan, who is working on a law in his state that would limit insurers’ ability to charge smokers more.” The federal law allows states to limit or change the smoking penalty. “We want people who are smoking to get smoking cessation treatment,” added Pan, a pediatrician who represents the Sacramento area. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
  •  - 
              Californian State Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, right, talks with schools chief Tom Torlakson, after Gov. Jerry Brown, delivered his State of the State address at the Capitol i

    Californian State Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, right, talks with schools chief Tom Torlakson, after Gov. Jerry Brown, delivered his State of the State address at the Capitol i

    Posted: 1/24/2013 4:03:30 PM EST
    Californian State Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, right, talks with schools chief Tom Torlakson, after Gov. Jerry Brown, delivered his State of the State address at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, Jan. 23, 2013. Millions of smokers could be priced out of health insurance because of tobacco penalties in President Barack Obama’s health care law, say experts who are just now teasing out the potential impact of an overlooked provision in the massive legislation. “We don’t want to create barriers for people to get health care coverage,” said California state Assemblyman Richard Pan, who is working on a law in his state that would limit insurers’ ability to charge smokers more.” The federal law allows states to limit or change the smoking penalty. “We want people who are smoking to get smoking cessation treatment,” added Pan, a pediatrician who represents the Sacramento area. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
  •  - 
              Gay rights campaigners kiss each other during a protest outside of State Duma, Russian Parliament's lower chamber, in downtown Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013. A federal law b

    Gay rights campaigners kiss each other during a protest outside of State Duma, Russian Parliament's lower chamber, in downtown Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013. A federal law b

    Posted: 1/22/2013 6:33:20 AM EST
    Gay rights campaigners kiss each other during a protest outside of State Duma, Russian Parliament's lower chamber, in downtown Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013. A federal law banning "homosexual propaganda" has been submitted to the Duma late last year and hailed by officials and Russia's dominant Orthodox Church. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)
  •  - 
              An Orthodox activist, right, reacts with a gay rights campaigner, during a protest outside of State Duma, Russian Parliament's lower chamber, in downtown Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, Jan

    An Orthodox activist, right, reacts with a gay rights campaigner, during a protest outside of State Duma, Russian Parliament's lower chamber, in downtown Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, Jan

    Posted: 1/22/2013 6:33:20 AM EST
    An Orthodox activist, right, reacts with a gay rights campaigner, during a protest outside of State Duma, Russian Parliament's lower chamber, in downtown Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013. A federal law banning "homosexual propaganda" has been submitted to the Duma late last year and hailed by officials and Russia's dominant Orthodox Church. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Nov. 26, 2010 file photo, a crowd watches as a Christmas tree is lit on Pioneer Courthouse square Friday night in Portland, Ore. where federal agents in a sting operation

    FILE - In this Nov. 26, 2010 file photo, a crowd watches as a Christmas tree is lit on Pioneer Courthouse square Friday night in Portland, Ore. where federal agents in a sting operation

    Posted: 1/11/2013 7:53:21 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 26, 2010 file photo, a crowd watches as a Christmas tree is lit on Pioneer Courthouse square Friday night in Portland, Ore. where federal agents in a sting operation arrested a Somali-born teenager just as he tried blowing up a van full of what he believed were explosives at the crowded ceremony. Portland's fractious relationship with federal law enforcement was on full display during jury selection for the terrorism trial of the teenager. Prospective jurors repeatedly expressed reservations about the FBI's terrorism stings and the war on terror during approximately eight hours of questioning on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013.(AP Photo/The Oregonian, Torsten Kjellstrand, File) MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2012 file photo, Joshua Montano, left, and Deborah Robles protest in front of the Capitol the day after Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, in an executive order reaffirmin

    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2012 file photo, Joshua Montano, left, and Deborah Robles protest in front of the Capitol the day after Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, in an executive order reaffirmin

    Posted: 11/30/2012 4:18:30 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2012 file photo, Joshua Montano, left, and Deborah Robles protest in front of the Capitol the day after Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, in an executive order reaffirming Arizona state law denying young illegal immigrants driver's licenses and other public benefits in Phoenix. Organizations that advocate for immigrant rights on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012 filed a lawsuit seeking to reverse an order by Jan Brewer that denies driving licenses to young immigrants who have obtained work permits and avoided deportation thanks to a new policy of President Barack Obama. The lawsuit alleges that Arizona's order actually classifies called "dreamers" as immigrants without permission to reside in the United States. The organizations asked a federal judge to declare unconstitutional the order because federal law takes precedence and because it denies licenses without a valid excuse. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - This Feb. 25, 2009 file photo shows Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-Texas speaking on Capitol Hill in Washington. An independent House panel says there is substantial reason to believe R

    FILE - This Feb. 25, 2009 file photo shows Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-Texas speaking on Capitol Hill in Washington. An independent House panel says there is substantial reason to believe R

    Posted: 11/28/2012 4:48:24 PM EST
    FILE - This Feb. 25, 2009 file photo shows Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-Texas speaking on Capitol Hill in Washington. An independent House panel says there is substantial reason to believe Reyes violated ethics rules and federal law by conducting campaign meetings on House property and using campaign money to pay expenses for his daughter's residence. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2012 file photo, a woman walks from a Hobby Lobby Inc., store in Little Rock, Ark. Hobby Lobby Stores, the arts and craft supply chain that wants to block enfor

    FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2012 file photo, a woman walks from a Hobby Lobby Inc., store in Little Rock, Ark. Hobby Lobby Stores, the arts and craft supply chain that wants to block enfor

    Posted: 11/1/2012 5:18:30 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2012 file photo, a woman walks from a Hobby Lobby Inc., store in Little Rock, Ark. Hobby Lobby Stores, the arts and craft supply chain that wants to block enforcement part of the new federal health care law that requires employers to cover insurance costs for the morning-after pill and the week-after pill is heading to court. Lawyers for the Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby Stores say the federal law is unconstitutional and violates the company's owners' religious beliefs by forcing them to fund the pills, which they say effectively cause an abortion. The company says failure to provide such insurance could lead to fines of up to $1.3 million a day. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/31/2012 9:20:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2011 file photo, Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley speaks to reporters at a news conference in Boston. A battle over the federal law that defines marriage as a union between a man and a woman appears headed for the Supreme Court after an appeals court ruled Thursday, May 31, 2012, that denying benefits to married gay couples is unconstitutional. The ruling came in two lawsuits, one filed by the Boston-based legal group Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) and the other by Coakley. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds, File)