Federal Government Photos on Townhall

  •  - People play billiard in settlement outside Kota Kinabalu where residents are mostly Filipino migrants

    People play billiard in settlement outside Kota Kinabalu where residents are mostly Filipino migrants

    Posted: 10/7/2012 6:26:16 PM EST
    People play billiard in a settlement outside Kota Kinabalu where residents are mostly Filipino migrants September 18, 2012. With a general election due within seven months, the 13-party ruling Barisan Nasional coalition is banking on Sabah and neighbouring Sarawak state on Borneo island to prolong its 55-year grip on power. Residents of Sabah complain about competition from Filipino and Indonesian migrants for jobs in the oil and gas-rich region, whose revenues are mostly channelled to the federal government and where one in five people lives on less than $1 a day. Picture taken September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad
  •  - Residents of Pulau Gaya's water village who are mostly Filipino migrants gather outside their houses on the sea just outside Kota Kinabalu

    Residents of Pulau Gaya's water village who are mostly Filipino migrants gather outside their houses on the sea just outside Kota Kinabalu

    Posted: 10/7/2012 5:14:02 PM EST
    Residents of Pulau Gaya's water village, who are mostly Filipino migrants, gather outside their houses on the sea outside Kota Kinabalu September 17, 2012. With a general election due within seven months, the 13-party ruling Barisan Nasional coalition is banking on Sabah and neighbouring Sarawak state on Borneo island to prolong its 55-year grip on power. Residents of Sabah complain about competition from Filipino and Indonesian migrants for jobs in the oil and gas-rich region, whose revenues are mostly channelled to the federal government and where one in five people lives on less than $1 a day. Picture taken September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad
  •  - Filipino Muslim migrant Atan sits in her house on the outskirts of Kota Kinabalu

    Filipino Muslim migrant Atan sits in her house on the outskirts of Kota Kinabalu

    Posted: 10/7/2012 5:14:02 PM EST
    Filipino Muslim migrant Hapidah Atan, 25, who received her Malaysian identity card in 2009, sits in her house on the outskirts of Kota Kinabalu September 18, 2012. With a general election due within seven months, the 13-party ruling Barisan Nasional coalition is banking on Sabah and neighbouring Sarawak state on Borneo island to prolong its 55-year grip on power. Residents of Sabah complain about competition from Filipino and Indonesian migrants for jobs in the oil and gas-rich region, whose revenues are mostly channelled to the federal government and where one in five people lives on less than $1 a day. Picture taken September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad
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              George Washington presents himself at head of army at Cambridge, Mass., on July 3, 1775. From Dorchester Heights, he laid siege to British in Boston. Latter evacuated city following Mar

    George Washington presents himself at head of army at Cambridge, Mass., on July 3, 1775. From Dorchester Heights, he laid siege to British in Boston. Latter evacuated city following Mar

    Posted: 9/24/2012 3:58:31 AM EST
    George Washington presents himself at head of army at Cambridge, Mass., on July 3, 1775. From Dorchester Heights, he laid siege to British in Boston. Latter evacuated city following March, taking garrison of 8,000 to New York. The U.S. has been borrowing since the 1700s, when it needed money to finance the American Revolution. The outstanding debt has since risen to a shade over $16 trillion. While there's plenty of finger-pointing by politicians over who's to blame, deficits historically surge during wars and deep recessions, and the U.S. has had both over the past decade. The budget deficit _ the shortfall created when the government spends more in a given year than it collects in taxes and fees_ is on track to top $1 trillion for the fourth straight year. When there's not enough to pay current bills, the government borrows, mostly by selling interest-bearing Treasury bonds, bills and notes to investors and governments worldwide. It now borrows about 40 cents for every dollar it spends. The national debt refers to the total amount the federal government owes; the deficit is just a one-year slice. (AP Photo)
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              FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 8, 2011, file photo, a statue of former Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin is seen outside the Treasury Building in Washington. A sea of red ink is confronti

    FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 8, 2011, file photo, a statue of former Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin is seen outside the Treasury Building in Washington. A sea of red ink is confronti

    Posted: 9/24/2012 3:58:28 AM EST
    FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 8, 2011, file photo, a statue of former Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin is seen outside the Treasury Building in Washington. A sea of red ink is confronting the nation and presidents to come. The budget deficit _ the shortfall created when the government spends more in a given year than it collects in taxes and fees_ is on track to top $1 trillion for the fourth straight year. When there's not enough to pay current bills, the government borrows, mostly by selling interest-bearing Treasury bonds, bills and notes to investors and governments worldwide. It now borrows about 40 cents for every dollar it spends. The national debt refers to the total amount the federal government owes; the deficit is just a one-year slice. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
  •  - A team of Kenya Defence Forces and Somali Transitional Federal Government soldiers patrol the Indian Ocean coastline in Burgabo

    A team of Kenya Defence Forces and Somali Transitional Federal Government soldiers patrol the Indian Ocean coastline in Burgabo

    Posted: 9/18/2012 11:34:22 AM EST
    A team of Kenya Defence Forces and Somali Transitional Federal Government (TFG) soldiers patrol the Indian Ocean coastline in Burgabo, south of Kismayu in Somalia December 14, 2011. REUTERS/Noor Khamis
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              FILE - In this May 24, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets Justic Green during a tour of the 6th grade language arts class a

    FILE - In this May 24, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets Justic Green during a tour of the 6th grade language arts class a

    Posted: 9/12/2012 12:38:23 AM EST
    FILE - In this May 24, 2012 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets Justic Green during a tour of the 6th grade language arts class at the Universal Bluford Charter School in Philadelphia. States and local governments have the primary responsibility for education in the United States. But the federal government gets a big say, too, by awarding billions in aid that often has strings attached. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
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              FILE This Sept. 23, 2011 file photo shows John Becker, a fourth grade teacher from DC Prep Public Charter School in Washington, D.C., top row center, reacting after he was acknowledged

    FILE This Sept. 23, 2011 file photo shows John Becker, a fourth grade teacher from DC Prep Public Charter School in Washington, D.C., top row center, reacting after he was acknowledged

    Posted: 9/12/2012 12:38:23 AM EST
    FILE This Sept. 23, 2011 file photo shows John Becker, a fourth grade teacher from DC Prep Public Charter School in Washington, D.C., top row center, reacting after he was acknowledged by President Barack Obama as he stands with educators and students as he speaks about No Child Left Behind Reform in the East Room at the White House in Washington. States and local governments have the primary responsibility for education in the United States. But the federal government gets a big say, too, by awarding billions in aid that often has strings attached. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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              In this Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 photo, Marine Sgt. Ron Strang, right, walks with his girlfriend, Monica Michna, in the yard by his home in Jefferson Hills, Pa., just south of Pittsburgh.

    In this Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 photo, Marine Sgt. Ron Strang, right, walks with his girlfriend, Monica Michna, in the yard by his home in Jefferson Hills, Pa., just south of Pittsburgh.

    Posted: 9/9/2012 1:03:34 PM EST
    In this Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 photo, Marine Sgt. Ron Strang, right, walks with his girlfriend, Monica Michna, in the yard by his home in Jefferson Hills, Pa., just south of Pittsburgh. In 2008, the federal government created AFIRM, the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, a network of top hospitals and universities around the country, and gave $300 million in grants to spur new treatments using cell science and advanced plastic surgery. Strang is among those benefiting. The 28-year-old former Marine sergeant from Pittsburgh lost half of his left thigh muscle to shrapnel, leaving too little to stabilize his gait. "My knee would buckle and I'd fall over," he said. Now, after an experimental cell treatment at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, "I'm able to run a little bit" and play a light football game with friends, he said. "It's been a huge improvement." (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
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              In this Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 photo, Marine Sgt. Ron Strang holds his Purple Heart medal in the living room of his home in Jefferson Hills, Pa., just south of Pittsburgh. In 2008, the f

    In this Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 photo, Marine Sgt. Ron Strang holds his Purple Heart medal in the living room of his home in Jefferson Hills, Pa., just south of Pittsburgh. In 2008, the f

    Posted: 9/9/2012 1:03:34 PM EST
    In this Monday, Aug. 20, 2012 photo, Marine Sgt. Ron Strang holds his Purple Heart medal in the living room of his home in Jefferson Hills, Pa., just south of Pittsburgh. In 2008, the federal government created AFIRM, the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, a network of top hospitals and universities around the country, and gave $300 million in grants to spur new treatments using cell science and advanced plastic surgery. Strang is among those benefiting. The 28-year-old former Marine sergeant from Pittsburgh lost half of a thigh muscle to shrapnel, leaving too little to stabilize his gait. "My knee would buckle and I'd fall over," he said. Now, after an experimental cell treatment at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, "I'm able to run a little bit" and play a light football game with friends, he said. "It's been a huge improvement." (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
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              This undated photo shows Wayne Hage riding his horse on Table Mountain, Nev.  For decades Nevada cattle rancher Wayne Hage took the federal government to court, challenging its decision

    This undated photo shows Wayne Hage riding his horse on Table Mountain, Nev. For decades Nevada cattle rancher Wayne Hage took the federal government to court, challenging its decision

    Posted: 9/1/2012 3:48:30 PM EST
    This undated photo shows Wayne Hage riding his horse on Table Mountain, Nev. For decades Nevada cattle rancher Wayne Hage took the federal government to court, challenging its decision to tightly regulate herd grazing on huge swaths of federal lands that had been used by ranchers like him for more than a century. The government's increased regulation was done in the name of conservation and greater public access, but the restricted access for ranchers became the poster-child for a “Sagebrush Rebellion,” a bitter battle between fiercely independent cattle wranglers and Washington’s tighter regulation of public lands. (AP Photo/CJ Hadley)
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              FILE - This file combination photo made from file images provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows two of nine cigarette warning labels from the FDA. A federal appeals cou

    FILE - This file combination photo made from file images provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows two of nine cigarette warning labels from the FDA. A federal appeals cou

    Posted: 8/24/2012 3:03:32 PM EST
    FILE - This file combination photo made from file images provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows two of nine cigarette warning labels from the FDA. A federal appeals court on Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, upheld a decision barring the federal government from requiring tobacco companies to put large graphic health warnings on cigarette packages to show that smoking can disfigure and even kill people. (AP Photo/U.S. Food and Drug Administration, File)
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              FILE - In a Monday, June 18, 2012 file photo, Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit prepares for a television interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, after he rang the opening bell

    FILE - In a Monday, June 18, 2012 file photo, Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit prepares for a television interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, after he rang the opening bell

    Posted: 8/16/2012 10:18:19 AM EST
    FILE - In a Monday, June 18, 2012 file photo, Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit prepares for a television interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, after he rang the opening bell. Twenty-six big U.S. companies paid their CEOs more last year than they paid the federal government in tax, according to a study released Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012 by the Institute for Policy Studies. The study said the companies, including AT&T, Boeing and Citigroup, paid their CEOs an average of $20.4 million last year while paying little or no federal tax on ample profits, according to regulatory filings. The study also laid into Citigroup for paying Pandit $14.9 million while the bank received a net $144 million in tax benefits. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
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              FILE - In a Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012 file photo, Boeing Company Chairman, President, and CEO W. James McNerney, Jr. attends the first-ever State Department Global Business Conference, at

    FILE - In a Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012 file photo, Boeing Company Chairman, President, and CEO W. James McNerney, Jr. attends the first-ever State Department Global Business Conference, at

    Posted: 8/16/2012 10:18:19 AM EST
    FILE - In a Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012 file photo, Boeing Company Chairman, President, and CEO W. James McNerney, Jr. attends the first-ever State Department Global Business Conference, at the State Department in Washington. Twenty-six big U.S. companies paid their CEOs more last year than they paid the federal government in tax, according to a study released Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012 by the Institute for Policy Studies. The study said the companies, including AT&T, Boeing and Citigroup, paid their CEOs an average of $20.4 million last year while paying little or no federal tax on ample profits, according to regulatory filings. The study said McNerney Jr. of Boeing got $18.4 million in pay last year while his company received a tax refund of $605 million. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
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              Children stand in line with some of the thousands of young immigrants at Chicago's Navy Pier on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, waiting for guidance with a new federal program that would help

    Children stand in line with some of the thousands of young immigrants at Chicago's Navy Pier on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, waiting for guidance with a new federal program that would help

    Posted: 8/15/2012 5:58:22 PM EST
    Children stand in line with some of the thousands of young immigrants at Chicago's Navy Pier on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, waiting for guidance with a new federal program that would help them work legally in the United States and avoid deportation. At least 11,000 people showed up for the workshop led by immigrant rights advocates for help in putting together identity documents and filling out the detailed forms on the first day that the federal government began accepting applications. (AP Photo/Sitthixay Ditthavong)
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              Young immigrants stand in a long line at Chicago's Navy Pier on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, for guidance with a new federal program that would help them work legally in the United States

    Young immigrants stand in a long line at Chicago's Navy Pier on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, for guidance with a new federal program that would help them work legally in the United States

    Posted: 8/15/2012 5:53:40 PM EST
    Young immigrants stand in a long line at Chicago's Navy Pier on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, for guidance with a new federal program that would help them work legally in the United States and avoid deportation. At least 11,000 people showed up for the workshop led by immigrant rights advocates for help in putting together identity documents and filling out the detailed forms on the first day that the federal government began accepting applications. (AP Photo/Sitthixay Ditthavong)
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              Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, right, shakes the hand of ethanol producer Duane Kristensen of Chief Ethanol Fuels in Hastings, Neb., left, as democratic senate candidate Bob Kerr

    Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, right, shakes the hand of ethanol producer Duane Kristensen of Chief Ethanol Fuels in Hastings, Neb., left, as democratic senate candidate Bob Kerr

    Posted: 8/10/2012 6:13:25 PM EST
    Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, right, shakes the hand of ethanol producer Duane Kristensen of Chief Ethanol Fuels in Hastings, Neb., left, as democratic senate candidate Bob Kerrey, center, looks on, following a meeting with agriculture producers in Omaha, Neb., Friday, Aug. 10, 2012. The federal government on Friday slashed its expectations for U.S. corn and soybean production for the second month in a row as the worst drought in decades continues punishing key farm states. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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              Grass begins to grown on the cracked bottom at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The reservoir is six feet below normal levels. More than half of U.S. count

    Grass begins to grown on the cracked bottom at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The reservoir is six feet below normal levels. More than half of U.S. count

    Posted: 8/2/2012 11:03:22 AM EST
    Grass begins to grown on the cracked bottom at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The reservoir is six feet below normal levels. More than half of U.S. counties now are classified by the federal government as natural disaster areas mostly because of the drought. The U.S. Agriculture Department on Wednesday added 218 counties in a dozen states as disaster areas. That brings this year's total to 1,584 in 32 states, more than 90 percent of them because of the drought. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
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              A dock extends into a dry cove where grass has begun to grow at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The reservoir is six feet below normal levels. More than h

    A dock extends into a dry cove where grass has begun to grow at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The reservoir is six feet below normal levels. More than h

    Posted: 8/2/2012 11:03:22 AM EST
    A dock extends into a dry cove where grass has begun to grow at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind., Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012. The reservoir is six feet below normal levels. More than half of U.S. counties now are classified by the federal government as natural disaster areas mostly because of the drought. The U.S. Agriculture Department on Wednesday added 218 counties in a dozen states as disaster areas. That brings this year's total to 1,584 in 32 states, more than 90 percent of them because of the drought. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
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              In a July 18, 2012 photo, a Kemp's Ridley turtle swims while being rehabbed from injuries sustained from a boat strike in the Gulf of Mexico, at the Audubon Aquatics Center in New Orlea

    In a July 18, 2012 photo, a Kemp's Ridley turtle swims while being rehabbed from injuries sustained from a boat strike in the Gulf of Mexico, at the Audubon Aquatics Center in New Orlea

    Posted: 8/1/2012 6:13:38 AM EST
    In a July 18, 2012 photo, a Kemp's Ridley turtle swims while being rehabbed from injuries sustained from a boat strike in the Gulf of Mexico, at the Audubon Aquatics Center in New Orleans. Efforts to protect endangered sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico have prompted strenuous complaints from the dwindling fleet of shrimpers blamed for drowning them in their nets, who say their own livelihoods are threatened. By next March the federal government wants about 2,435 shrimp boats, most run by mom-and-pop operations, to install turtle-saving gear in their nets to protect the turtles, whose survival has gained renewed concern after BP's catastrophic 2010 Gulf oil spill. The spill prompted closer study of turtle deaths, though scientists have concluded that most were due to drowning and not effects of the spill. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)