federal employees Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this June 15, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about granting work permits to younger illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children and have since led law-a

    FILE - In this June 15, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about granting work permits to younger illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children and have since led law-a

    Posted: 7/24/2012 4:18:22 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 15, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about granting work permits to younger illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children and have since led law-abiding lives, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. The Obama administration's new plan to grant temporary work permits to many young, illegal immigrants who otherwise could be deported may cost more than $585 million and require hiring hundreds of new federal employees to process more than 1 million anticipated requests, according to internal Homeland Security Department plans obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
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              FILE - In this June 15, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about granting work permits to younger illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children and have since led law-a

    FILE - In this June 15, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about granting work permits to younger illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children and have since led law-a

    Posted: 7/24/2012 1:13:42 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 15, 2012 file photo, President Barack Obama talks about granting work permits to younger illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children and have since led law-abiding lives, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. The Obama administration's new plan to grant temporary work permits to many young, illegal immigrants who otherwise could be deported may cost the government more than $585 million and require hiring hundreds of new federal employees to process more than 1 million anticipated requests, according to internal Homeland Security Department plans obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
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    Posted: 4/5/2012 4:10:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2009 file photo, hotels and casinos are lit up along the strip in Las Vegas. A report released this week detailing an extravagant conference held by federal employees near Las Vegas in October 2010 has set Nevada abuzz. The internal report by the General Services Administration resulted in the termination of two top deputies and the resignation of the little-known agency's top official hours before its release. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, File)
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    Posted: 4/5/2012 4:10:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 3, 2009 file photo, GSA Administrator-designate Martha Johnson testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. A report released this week detailing an extravagant conference held by federal employees near Las Vegas in October 2010 has set Nevada abuzz. The internal report by the General Services Administration resulted in the termination of two top deputies and the resignation of Martha Johnson. (AP Photo/Harry Hamburg, File)
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    Posted: 8/2/2011 11:30:49 PM EST
    U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood discusses the interruption of federal funding for airport construction projects and contractors at LaGuardia Airport in New York, Monday, August 1, 2011. The FAA's operating authority expired at midnight Friday, forcing a partial shutdown of the agency. Dozens of airport construction projects across the country have been put on hold and thousands of federal employees were out of work. In the background is an old air traffic control tower whose demolition has been interrupted because of the funding interruption. (AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
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    Posted: 8/2/2011 11:30:49 PM EST
    U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, center, poses with tradesmen after a news conference to discuss the interruption of federal funding for airport construction projects and contractors at LaGuardia Airport in New York, Monday, August 1, 2011. The FAA's operating authority expired at midnight Friday, forcing a partial shutdown of the agency. Dozens of airport construction projects across the country have been put on hold and thousands of federal employees were out of work. (AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
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    Posted: 8/2/2011 11:30:49 PM EST
    U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, left, talks to American Airlines pilot Jesse J. Perkins after a news conference at which LaHood spoke of the interruption of federal funding for airport construction projects and contractors, at LaGuardia Airport in New York, Monday, August 1, 2011. The FAA's operating authority expired at midnight Friday, forcing a partial shutdown of the agency. Dozens of airport construction projects across the country have been put on hold and thousands of federal employees were out of work. (AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
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    Posted: 8/2/2011 3:20:47 AM EST
    U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood discusses the interruption of federal funding for airport construction projects and contractors at LaGuardia Airport in New York, Monday, August 1, 2011. The FAA's operating authority expired at midnight Friday, forcing a partial shutdown of the agency. Dozens of airport construction projects across the country have been put on hold and thousands of federal employees were out of work. In the background is an old air traffic control tower whose demolition has been interrupted because of the funding interruption. (AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
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    Posted: 8/2/2011 3:20:47 AM EST
    U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, left, talks to FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt during a news conference to discuss the interruption of federal funding for airport construction projects and contractors at LaGuardia Airport in New York, Monday, August 1, 2011.The FAA's operating authority expired at midnight Friday, forcing a partial shutdown of the agency. Dozens of airport construction projects across the country have been put on hold and thousands of federal employees were out of work. (AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
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    Posted: 7/3/2011 11:16:06 PM EST
    A stop sign stands in front of an entrance to the Santa Clara Indian Reservation during the Las Conchas fire in Santa Clara Pueblo, N.M., Saturday, July 2, 2011. The wildfire that forced federal employees to flee the desert birthplace of the atomic bomb neared the sacred sites of several American Indian tribes on Saturday, raising fears that tribal lands passed down for generations would be destroyed. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
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    Posted: 5/19/2011 6:52:07 AM EST
    Annetta Cheek is interviewed by the Associated Press at her home in Bailey's Crossroads, Va., Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011. For much of her career in the federal civil service and now as a founder of the Center for Plain Language, Cheek has led efforts to make the government communicate with the public in ways average people can understand. The federal government is rolling out a new official language of sorts: plain English. A communications overhaul is under way as federal employees learn how to make more sense in their writing to the public. Their guide is the Plain Writing Act signed by President Barack Obama in the fall after decades of effort by passionate grammarians in the civil service to jettison the jargon. (AP Photo/Calvin Woodward)