FDA Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 4/5/2012 2:45:46 AM EST
    This photo provided by Office of Public Affairs, FDA shows a counterfeit version of the best-selling cancer drug Avastin. The Food and Drug Administration is warning doctors that a second counterfeit version of the best-selling cancer drug Avastin has been found in the U.S., packaged as the Turkish brand of the medication. The FDA said late Tuesday, April 3, 2012, that the counterfeits do not contain the active ingredient in Avastin, which is used to treat cancers of the colon, lung, kidney and brain. The vials are packaged as Altuzan, the Turkish version of Avastin that is not approved for use in the U.S. The agency says any packages or vials labeled with the lot number B6021 should be considered counterfeit. (AP Photo/Office of Public Affairs, FDA )
  •  - To match Insight PROVENGE/

    To match Insight PROVENGE/

    Posted: 3/30/2012 9:25:42 AM EST
    Marie Huber, a former hedge-fund analyst who was trained as a scientist, poses in New York, March 8, 2012. Huber has made it her mission in the last year to analyze what she believes are deadly flaws in the studies that led to FDA approval of Provenge, known scientifically as sipuleucel-T. She argues that the main reason Provenge seemed to extend survival a crucial factor in the FDA's decision was that older men in the study who did not receive Provenge died months sooner than similar patients in other studies. Picture taken March 8, 2012. To match Insight PROVENGE/ REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Insight PROVENGE/

    To match Insight PROVENGE/

    Posted: 3/30/2012 9:25:24 AM EST
    Marie Huber, a former hedge-fund analyst who was trained as a scientist, poses in New York, March 8, 2012. Huber has made it her mission in the last year to analyze what she believes are deadly flaws in the studies that led to FDA approval of Provenge, known scientifically as sipuleucel-T. She argues that the main reason Provenge seemed to extend survival a crucial factor in the FDA's decision was that older men in the study who did not receive Provenge died months sooner than similar patients in other studies. Picture taken March 8, 2012. To match Insight PROVENGE/ REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
  •  - To match Insight PROVENGE/

    To match Insight PROVENGE/

    Posted: 3/30/2012 9:25:06 AM EST
    Marie Huber, a former hedge-fund analyst who was trained as a scientist, poses in New York, March 8, 2012. Huber has made it her mission in the last year to analyze what she believes are deadly flaws in the studies that led to FDA approval of Provenge, known scientifically as sipuleucel-T. She argues that the main reason Provenge seemed to extend survival a crucial factor in the FDA's decision was that older men in the study who did not receive Provenge died months sooner than similar patients in other studies. Picture taken March 8, 2012. To match Insight PROVENGE/ REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 1/25/2012 5:45:47 PM EST
    This undated photo provided by Genentech Inc. on Jan. 31, 2011 shows a vial of the drug Avastin. Surprising results from two new studies may reopen the debate about the value of Avastin for breast cancer. The drug helped make tumors disappear when given with chemotherapy before surgery to certain women with early-stage disease, doctors found. The FDA recently revoked Avastin's approval for advanced breast cancer, but the studies suggest it might help others whose cancer has not widely spread. (AP Photo/Genentech Inc., File)
  •  - Trent Arsenault picks lemons from a tree at his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault picks lemons from a tree at his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 11:14:28 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault picks lemons from a tree at his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Trent Arsenault stands on his porch at his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault stands on his porch at his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 11:13:14 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault stands on his porch at his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Trent Arsenault feeds his cat at his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault feeds his cat at his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 11:11:40 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault feeds his cat at his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Trent Arsenault prepares a fruit drink at his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault prepares a fruit drink at his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 11:08:41 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault prepares a fruit drink at his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Trent Arsenault looks at his supply of specimen cups at his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault looks at his supply of specimen cups at his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 10:52:43 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault looks at his supply of specimen cups at his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - Trent Arsenault works from his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault works from his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 10:50:38 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault works from his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Trent Arsenault pets his cat at his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault pets his cat at his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 10:43:17 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault pets his cat at his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Trent Arsenault stands in front of his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault stands in front of his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 10:41:38 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault stands in front of his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
  •  - Trent Arsenault looks at his supply of specimen cups at his home in Fremont

    Trent Arsenault looks at his supply of specimen cups at his home in Fremont

    Posted: 12/19/2011 10:34:53 PM EST
    Trent Arsenault looks at his supply of specimen cups at his home in Fremont, California, December 19, 2011. Arsenault, who has produced 14 children with more than 300 sperm donations to 46 women, is violating laws that require donation of human tissue to be tested, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Hewlett Packard engineer has hired an attorney, saying the FDA has no business interfering in his private transactions. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
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    Posted: 11/1/2011 3:00:51 AM EST
    President Barack Obama speaks in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, prior to signing an executive order directing the Food and Drug Administration to take steps to reduce drug shortages. From left are, pharmacy manager Bonnie Frawley from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, cancer patient Jay Cuetara from San Francisco, and FDA Commissioner Peggy Hamburg. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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    Posted: 11/1/2011 3:00:51 AM EST
    President Barack Obama gestures in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, where he signed an executive order directing the Food and Drug Administration to take steps to reduce drug shortages. From left are, pharmacy manager Bonnie Frawley from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, cancer patient Jay Cuetara from San Francisco, and FDA Commissioner Peggy Hamburg. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  •  - A recalled Landshire Nike All-American sandwich is seen in an FDA handout image

    A recalled Landshire Nike All-American sandwich is seen in an FDA handout image

    Posted: 10/25/2011 11:30:14 AM EST
    A recalled Landshire Nike All-American sandwich is seen in an FDA handout image. REUTERS/U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Handout
  •  - A recalled Landshire Nike All-American sandwich is seen in an FDA handout image

    A recalled Landshire Nike All-American sandwich is seen in an FDA handout image

    Posted: 10/25/2011 11:02:48 AM EST
    A recalled Landshire Nike All-American sandwich is seen in an FDA handout image. REUTERS/U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Handout
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    Posted: 8/24/2011 6:25:48 PM EST
    Kathleen Martin-Weis, acting director of the FDA office of criminal investigations, and Peter Neronha, U.S. attorney for the district of Rhode Island, announce a $500 million settlement with Internet giant Google over Canadian drug advertisements Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011, in Providence, R.I. The agreement settles a federal investigation into Google's distribution of online ads from Canadian pharmacies that were illegally selling prescription and non-prescription drugs to American consumers. (AP Photo/Joe Giblin)
  •  - An analyst of FDA shows how a machine works, to determine the presence of chemical substances prevent in any health product, inside a FDA headquarters in Muntinlupa city

    An analyst of FDA shows how a machine works, to determine the presence of chemical substances prevent in any health product, inside a FDA headquarters in Muntinlupa city

    Posted: 6/1/2011 7:52:06 AM EST
    An analyst of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shows the media how a machine called High Performance Liquid Chromatograph works, to determine the presence of chemical substances prevent in any health product, inside a FDA headquarters in Muntinlupa city, south of Manila June 1, 2011. FDA official on Wednesday released a copy of Taiwan products contaminated with the toxic substance Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which are already in Philippine stores. FDA said supermarkets and retail stores will be asked to remove temporarily high-risk products from Taiwan such as sports drinks, soft drinks, juices, and jellies which are suspected of containing the chemical "DEHP". Taiwanese authorities discovered that DEHP had been illegally added to a food product raw material known as "cloudy agent" used for emulsification, a local media reported. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco (PHILIPPINES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)