FAA Photos on Townhall

  •  - Boeing executive holds up the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft after receiving it from EASA administrator during the jetliner's certification event at Paine Field in

    Boeing executive holds up the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft after receiving it from EASA administrator during the jetliner's certification event at Paine Field in

    Posted: 8/26/2011 3:46:54 PM EST
    Dan Mooney (C) Boeing vice president of 787 Dreamliner development holds up the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft after receiving it from Patrick Goudou (R), European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) executive director, during the jetliner's certification event at Paine Field in Everett, Washington on August 26, 2011. Also pictured is FAA executive Terry Beezhold (L). A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) administrator also presented Boeing executives with their certification letter at the event. All-Nippon Airways (ANA) of Japan is scheduled to be the first airline to receive the first production line 787 Dreamliner. REUTERS/Anthony Bolante (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - Boeing executive holds up the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft after receiving it from FAA administrator during the jetliner's certification event at Paine Field in

    Boeing executive holds up the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft after receiving it from FAA administrator during the jetliner's certification event at Paine Field in

    Posted: 8/26/2011 3:40:42 PM EST
    Boeing vice president and 787 Dreamliner chief production engineer Mike Sinnett (L) holds up the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft after receiving it from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) administrator Randy Babbit (R) during the jetliner's certification event at Paine Field in Everett, Washington on August 26, 2011. Also, a European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) representative also presented Boeing executives with their certification letter. All-Nippon Airways (ANA) of Japan is scheduled to be the first airline to receive the first production line 787 Dreamliner. REUTERS/Anthony Bolante (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
  •  - FAA administrator presents a Boeing executive with the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft at Paine Field in Everett, Washington

    FAA administrator presents a Boeing executive with the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft at Paine Field in Everett, Washington

    Posted: 8/26/2011 3:29:18 PM EST
    Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) administrator Randy Babbit (R) presents Boeing vice president and 787 Dreamliner chief production engineer Mike Sinnett the certification to produce and fly the 787 Dreamliner aircraft during the jetliner's certification event at Paine Field in Everett, Washington on August 26, 2011. Also, a European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) representative also presented Boeing executives with their certification letter. All-Nippon Airways (ANA) of Japan is scheduled to be the first airline to receive the first production line 787 Dreamliner. REUTERS/Anthony Bolante (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 11:05:46 AM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday July, 28, 2011, file photo Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood speaks at a White House news briefing in Washington in which he prodded lawmakers to pass a bill to put the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) back in business. He said the notion that members of Congress could give speeches about creating jobs only to go on vacation without acting on the FAA legislation ?rings very hollow.? ?This is what infuriates the American people,? the former Republican House member from Illinois grumbled before the FAA deal was struck on Friday, Aug. 5. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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    Posted: 8/2/2011 3:20:47 AM EST
    U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, left, talks to FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt during a news conference to discuss the interruption of federal funding for airport construction projects and contractors at LaGuardia Airport in New York, Monday, August 1, 2011.The FAA's operating authority expired at midnight Friday, forcing a partial shutdown of the agency. Dozens of airport construction projects across the country have been put on hold and thousands of federal employees were out of work. (AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
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    Posted: 7/27/2011 7:31:31 PM EST
    Rep. Peter DeFazio D-Ore. second from right, holds up a newspaper ad during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 27, 2011, calling for a clean Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reauthorization bill to get more FAA employees and construction workers back to work. From left are, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., DeFazio, and Rep. Jerry Costello, D-Ill. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
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    Posted: 7/12/2011 3:15:58 AM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2011 file photo, Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. After Inhofe landed his small plane on a closed runway at a rural South Texas airport last October sending workers on the ground scrambling, he was ordered by the Federal Aviation Administration to take remedial piloting lessons. Now, the Oklahoma Republican is seeking to give the FAA a lesson in politics. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
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    Posted: 7/6/2011 3:55:52 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2008 file photo, navigation controls are seen in the cockpit of a FAA Gulfstream jet at a hangar at Washington's Reagan National Airport. Industry officials say the federal program to create a new air traffic control system is at a crossroads, making delays possible. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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    Posted: 6/1/2011 1:41:40 PM EST
    FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt talks about the civil penalties for pointing a laser into a plane cockpit, Wednesday, June 1, 2011, at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport. U.S. government aviation officials say they will start imposing fines against people who point powerful lasers at planes and helicopters, which can temporarily blind pilots. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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    Posted: 6/1/2011 1:41:39 PM EST
    FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt, right, accompanied by Air Line Pilots Association International President Lee Moak, center, and Delta Airlines pilot Chad Smith, talks about the civil penalties for pointing a laser into a plane cockpit, Wednesday, June 1, 2011, at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  •  - Handout of Denver Center air traffic controller Charles Rohrer

    Handout of Denver Center air traffic controller Charles Rohrer

    Posted: 5/26/2011 9:45:19 PM EST
    Denver Center air traffic controller Charles Rohrer is seen in this FAA photograph released to Reuters May 26, 2011. A woman with no flight experience flew a small plane over Colorado for 40 minutes after her husband blacked out at the controls, the Federal Aviation Administration said on Thursday. The unidentified couple was en route from San Bernadino, California to Colorado Springs aboard a Cirrus SR 22 on May 17 when Rohrer, a Denver Center air traffic controller, noticed the pilot was unintelligible and slurring his speech, the FAA said in a report of the incident. Rohrer, suspected the pilot was flying too high in the unpressurized aircraft and was suffering from a lack of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia, according to the FAA. REUTERS/FAA/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT SOCIETY HEADSHOT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS,
  •  - Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters views center fuel tank area of the TWA Flight 800 in Ashburn Virginia

    Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters views center fuel tank area of the TWA Flight 800 in Ashburn Virginia

    Posted: 7/16/2008 1:44:20 PM EST
    U.S. Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters (2nd R) views the center fuel tank area of the TWA Flight 800 reassembled from recovered wreckage, at National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Training Facility in Ashburn, Virginia, July 16, 2008. The Department of Transportation will mandate that all new aircrafts and passenger aircrafts built after 1991 must be equipped with technology designed to keep center fuel tanks from catching fire. The FAA rule comes one day before the 12th anniversary of the crash of TWA Flight 800 from New York to Paris when it exploded off Long Island, killing all 230 people aboard in 1996. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang (UNITED STATES)