Extreme Photos on Townhall

  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken February 27, 2012. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken February 27, 2012. REUTERS/Mark Hindell/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    Two Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken February 27, 2012. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken February 27, 2012. REUTERS/Mark Hindell/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/25/2013 10:54:40 PM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/25/2013 10:54:40 PM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/25/2013 10:54:40 PM EST
    Two Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/25/2013 10:54:40 PM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken February 27, 2012. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken February 27, 2012. REUTERS/Mark Hindell/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
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              A pedestrian walks along the sidewalk in the Country Club Plaza shopping district in Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013.  The Missouri Department of Transportation said Interstat

    A pedestrian walks along the sidewalk in the Country Club Plaza shopping district in Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. The Missouri Department of Transportation said Interstat

    Posted: 2/21/2013 1:58:31 PM EST
    A pedestrian walks along the sidewalk in the Country Club Plaza shopping district in Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. The Missouri Department of Transportation said Interstate 44 near Springfield was completely covered with ice Thursday morning. Traffic was moving very slow and the DOT urged drivers to use extreme caution or stay home. St. Louis-area road crews were out in full force early Thursday, even though it was dry. The region was expecting a volatile mix of snow, sleet, ice and freezing rain by midday and crews were hoping to lay down enough salt to keep at least the major roadways moving. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
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              A pedestrian crosses the street near the Country Club Plaza shopping district Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013.  The Missouri Department of Transportation said Interstate 44 ne

    A pedestrian crosses the street near the Country Club Plaza shopping district Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. The Missouri Department of Transportation said Interstate 44 ne

    Posted: 2/21/2013 1:13:32 PM EST
    A pedestrian crosses the street near the Country Club Plaza shopping district Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. The Missouri Department of Transportation said Interstate 44 near Springfield was completely covered with ice Thursday morning. Traffic was moving very slow and the DOT urged drivers to use extreme caution or stay home. St. Louis-area road crews were out in full force early Thursday, even though it was dry. The region was expecting a volatile mix of snow, sleet, ice and freezing rain by midday and crews were hoping to lay down enough salt to keep at least the major roadways moving. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
  •  - 
              A commuter ferry crosses the harbor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, through fog caused by cold air moving over warm water. Frigid temperatures persist acros

    A commuter ferry crosses the harbor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, through fog caused by cold air moving over warm water. Frigid temperatures persist acros

    Posted: 1/24/2013 3:53:25 PM EST
    A commuter ferry crosses the harbor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, through fog caused by cold air moving over warm water. Frigid temperatures persist across parts of Canada as bitterly cold Arctic air and high winds deliver extreme wind chill values. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)
  •  - 
              Eddie Saman walks to his home, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy and will have to be renovated. Meanw

    Eddie Saman walks to his home, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy and will have to be renovated. Meanw

    Posted: 1/23/2013 3:18:30 PM EST
    Eddie Saman walks to his home, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy and will have to be renovated. Meanwhile, because of the extreme cold weather, Saman has been spending the night in a tent nearby operated by the volunteer group Cedar Grove Community Hub. A cold wave with sub-zero temperatures is expected to keep its icy grip on much of the eastern U.S. into the weekend before seasonable temperatures bring relief.(AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              Eddie Saman shows off his home which he has insulated with blankets donated by the Red Cross, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly d

    Eddie Saman shows off his home which he has insulated with blankets donated by the Red Cross, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly d

    Posted: 1/23/2013 3:18:30 PM EST
    Eddie Saman shows off his home which he has insulated with blankets donated by the Red Cross, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy and will have to be renovated. Meanwhile, because of the extreme cold weather, Saman has been spending the night in a tent nearby operated by the volunteer group Cedar Grove Community Hub. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  •  - 
              Anthony Gambino points to the house he rents, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy and renovations are n

    Anthony Gambino points to the house he rents, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy and renovations are n

    Posted: 1/23/2013 3:18:30 PM EST
    Anthony Gambino points to the house he rents, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013 in the borough of Staten Island in New York. The house was badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy and renovations are not yet complete. Meanwhile, because of the extreme cold weather, Gambino has been spending the night in a tent nearby operated by the volunteer group Cedar Grove Community Hub. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  •  - 
              A Commuter bundles up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10

    A Commuter bundles up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10

    Posted: 1/22/2013 10:38:21 PM EST
    A Commuter bundles up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10 below. Forecasters say waves of frigid Arctic air began moving over the region Saturday night Jan. 19, 2013. Temperatures are expected to rebound Wednesday Jan. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              A flock of geese huddles to stay warm on a slab of ice enveloped by steam on the Rock River in Watertown, Wis. as arctic air pushes through the Upper Midwest on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013.

    A flock of geese huddles to stay warm on a slab of ice enveloped by steam on the Rock River in Watertown, Wis. as arctic air pushes through the Upper Midwest on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013.

    Posted: 1/22/2013 2:33:22 PM EST
    A flock of geese huddles to stay warm on a slab of ice enveloped by steam on the Rock River in Watertown, Wis. as arctic air pushes through the Upper Midwest on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013. The upper Midwest region is grappling with another day of extreme cold. (AP Photo/Watertown Daily Times, Samantha Christian)
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              A Commuter bundles up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10

    A Commuter bundles up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10

    Posted: 1/22/2013 2:33:22 PM EST
    A Commuter bundles up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10 below. Forecasters say waves of frigid Arctic air began moving over the region Saturday night Jan. 19, 2013. Temperatures are expected to rebound Wednesday Jan. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              Commuters bundle up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10 be

    Commuters bundle up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10 be

    Posted: 1/22/2013 2:33:22 PM EST
    Commuters bundle up against extreme cold conditions Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013, in Chicago. Temperatures in the area were hovering around zero with sub-zero wind chill reading hitting 10 below. Forecasters say waves of frigid Arctic air began moving over the region Saturday night Jan. 19, 2013. Temperatures are expected to rebound Wednesday Jan. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
  •  - 
              Mourners pray in front of the coffin carrying the body of Shehzad Luqman, a Pakistani immigrant who was murdered on Thursday after being stabbed by suspected extreme rightists, during a

    Mourners pray in front of the coffin carrying the body of Shehzad Luqman, a Pakistani immigrant who was murdered on Thursday after being stabbed by suspected extreme rightists, during a

    Posted: 1/19/2013 3:23:25 PM EST
    Mourners pray in front of the coffin carrying the body of Shehzad Luqman, a Pakistani immigrant who was murdered on Thursday after being stabbed by suspected extreme rightists, during a ceremony in front of the city Hall in Athens on Saturday, Jan. 19 2013. An estimated 3,000 people marched through central Athens in protest at a spate of anti-immigrant attacks that turned fatal Thursday when a 27-year-old Pakistani immigrant was stabbed by suspected extreme rightists. (AP Photo/Kostas Tsironis)


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