Extreme Photos on Townhall

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              In this May 22, 2013 photo distributed by Miura Dolphins Co. Ltd., 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura, left, uses oxygen mask and his son, Gota sips green tea as they tak

    In this May 22, 2013 photo distributed by Miura Dolphins Co. Ltd., 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura, left, uses oxygen mask and his son, Gota sips green tea as they tak

    Posted: 5/22/2013 10:56:23 PM EST
    In this May 22, 2013 photo distributed by Miura Dolphins Co. Ltd., 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura, left, uses oxygen mask and his son, Gota sips green tea as they take a rest in a tent at their South Col camp at 8,000 meters (26,247 feet) before their departure for Camp 5 during their attempt to scale the summit of Mount Everest. Miura, who climbed Mount Everest five years ago, but just missed becoming the oldest man to reach the summit, was back on the mountain Wednesday to make another attempt at the title. (AP Photo/Miura Dolphins Co. Ltd.) MANDATORY CREDIT
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              In this Tuesday, May 21, 2013, photo distributed by Miura Dolphins, 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura rests in a camp at 8,000 meters (26,247 feet) during his attempt to

    In this Tuesday, May 21, 2013, photo distributed by Miura Dolphins, 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura rests in a camp at 8,000 meters (26,247 feet) during his attempt to

    Posted: 5/22/2013 8:33:21 PM EST
    In this Tuesday, May 21, 2013, photo distributed by Miura Dolphins, 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura rests in a camp at 8,000 meters (26,247 feet) during his attempt to scale the summit of Mount Everest. According to his management office, Miura plans to reach the 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) peak on Thursday, May 23 to be the world's oldest person to climb the world's highest peak. His rival, 81-year-old Min Bahadur Sherchan, from Nepal, who nabbed the record just before he could in 2008, was at the base camp preparing for his own attempt on the summit next week. (AP Photo/Miura Dolphins) MANDATORY CREDIT
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              In this Tuesday, May 21, 2013 photo distributed by Miura Dolphins, 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura, right, and his son, Gota, eat rolled sushi at their South Col camp

    In this Tuesday, May 21, 2013 photo distributed by Miura Dolphins, 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura, right, and his son, Gota, eat rolled sushi at their South Col camp

    Posted: 5/22/2013 8:33:21 PM EST
    In this Tuesday, May 21, 2013 photo distributed by Miura Dolphins, 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier Yuichiro Miura, right, and his son, Gota, eat rolled sushi at their South Col camp at 8,000 meters (26,247 feet) during their attempt to scale the summit of Mount Everest. According to his management office, Miura plans to reach the 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) peak on Thursday, May 23 to be the world's oldest person to climb the world's highest peak. His rival, 81-year-old Min Bahadur Sherchan, from Nepal, who nabbed the record just before he could in 2008, was at the base camp preparing for his own attempt on the summit next week. (AP Photo/Miura Dolphins) MANDATORY CREDIT
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              FILE - In this May 31, 2008 file photo, Min Bahadur Sherchan, center, who became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest on May 25, 2008 shakes hands on his arrival in Katmandu, Nepal.

    FILE - In this May 31, 2008 file photo, Min Bahadur Sherchan, center, who became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest on May 25, 2008 shakes hands on his arrival in Katmandu, Nepal.

    Posted: 5/22/2013 8:33:21 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 31, 2008 file photo, Min Bahadur Sherchan, center, who became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest on May 25, 2008 shakes hands on his arrival in Katmandu, Nepal. Yuichiro Miura, an 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier who just missed becoming the oldest man to reach the summit of Mount Everest five years ago is back on the mountain to make another attempt at the title. Unfortunately for Miura, Sherchan, the slightly older man who nabbed the record a day before he could in 2008 is fast on his heels. (AP Photo/Binod Joshi, File)
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              FILE - In this May 31, 2008 file photo, Min Bahadur Sherchan, who became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest on May 25, 2008 smiles on his arrival in Katmandu, Nepal. Yuichiro Miur

    FILE - In this May 31, 2008 file photo, Min Bahadur Sherchan, who became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest on May 25, 2008 smiles on his arrival in Katmandu, Nepal. Yuichiro Miur

    Posted: 5/22/2013 8:33:21 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 31, 2008 file photo, Min Bahadur Sherchan, who became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest on May 25, 2008 smiles on his arrival in Katmandu, Nepal. Yuichiro Miura, an 80-year-old Japanese extreme skier who just missed becoming the oldest man to reach the summit of Mount Everest five years ago is back on the mountain to make another attempt at the title. Unfortunately for Miura, Sherchan, the slightly older man who nabbed the record a day before he could in 2008 is fast on his heels. (AP Photo/Binod Joshi, File)
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              FILE- Unidentified members of the extreme far right group the English Defense League as a English flag is blown over his face, during a protest outside the Houses of Parliament in Londo

    FILE- Unidentified members of the extreme far right group the English Defense League as a English flag is blown over his face, during a protest outside the Houses of Parliament in Londo

    Posted: 4/30/2013 7:33:34 AM EST
    FILE- Unidentified members of the extreme far right group the English Defense League as a English flag is blown over his face, during a protest outside the Houses of Parliament in London, in this file photo dated Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012. Six men have pleaded guilty Tuesday April 30, 2013, in a London court to plotting a terror attack on a rally by the far-right English Defense League which claims to be a peaceful opponent of radical Islam, but its opponents accuse the party of racism, and its protests have often turned violent. The six men pleaded guilty as prosecutors said the men were preparing to attack an EDL rally in northern England in June 2012. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, FILE)
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              This undated image provided by James Weitze shows a truck driver taking a self portrait on the road. Weitze satisfies his video fix with an iPhone. He sleeps most of the time in his tru

    This undated image provided by James Weitze shows a truck driver taking a self portrait on the road. Weitze satisfies his video fix with an iPhone. He sleeps most of the time in his tru

    Posted: 4/7/2013 2:28:40 PM EST
    This undated image provided by James Weitze shows a truck driver taking a self portrait on the road. Weitze satisfies his video fix with an iPhone. He sleeps most of the time in his truck, and has no apartment. To be sure, he's an extreme case and probably wouldn't fit into Nielsen's definition of a household in the first place. But he's watching Netflix enough to keep up on shows like “Weeds,” “30 Rock,” “Arrested Development,” “Breaking Bad,” “It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “Sons of Anarchy.” (AP Photo/James Weitze)
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              Protesters from the extreme right group shout slogans and wave flags during a rally outside the Cypriot Parliament in central capital Nicosia, on Thursday, March 28, 2013. There were lo

    Protesters from the extreme right group shout slogans and wave flags during a rally outside the Cypriot Parliament in central capital Nicosia, on Thursday, March 28, 2013. There were lo

    Posted: 3/29/2013 4:28:32 AM EST
    Protesters from the extreme right group shout slogans and wave flags during a rally outside the Cypriot Parliament in central capital Nicosia, on Thursday, March 28, 2013. There were long lines of anxious people but no sign of trouble as banks in Cyprus opened Thursday for the first time in nearly two weeks, following an international bailout that sought to prevent the country from financial ruin. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
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              A protestor from the extreme right group shouts slogans and holds a flag during a rally outside the Cypriot Parliament in central capital Nicosia, on Thursday, March 28, 2013. There wer

    A protestor from the extreme right group shouts slogans and holds a flag during a rally outside the Cypriot Parliament in central capital Nicosia, on Thursday, March 28, 2013. There wer

    Posted: 3/29/2013 4:28:32 AM EST
    A protestor from the extreme right group shouts slogans and holds a flag during a rally outside the Cypriot Parliament in central capital Nicosia, on Thursday, March 28, 2013. There were long lines of anxious people but no sign of trouble as banks in Cyprus opened Thursday for the first time in nearly two weeks, following an international bailout that sought to prevent the country from financial ruin. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
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              In this March 14, 2013 photo taken through a cable car window, a woman holds on to the railing inside a cable car as she commutes home to a shantytown in Caracas, Venezuela. The extreme

    In this March 14, 2013 photo taken through a cable car window, a woman holds on to the railing inside a cable car as she commutes home to a shantytown in Caracas, Venezuela. The extreme

    Posted: 3/20/2013 12:18:34 PM EST
    In this March 14, 2013 photo taken through a cable car window, a woman holds on to the railing inside a cable car as she commutes home to a shantytown in Caracas, Venezuela. The extreme politicization of the Hugo Chavez years has made it impossible for federal, state and municipal officials to work together on basic strategies such as neighborhood watches or cross-jurisdiction police patrols. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
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              FILE - The March 28, 2010 file photos shows a right wing protestor during a demonstration of the extreme right national democratic party of Germany (NPD) demonstration in Duisburg.  Ger

    FILE - The March 28, 2010 file photos shows a right wing protestor during a demonstration of the extreme right national democratic party of Germany (NPD) demonstration in Duisburg. Ger

    Posted: 3/20/2013 9:43:30 AM EST
    FILE - The March 28, 2010 file photos shows a right wing protestor during a demonstration of the extreme right national democratic party of Germany (NPD) demonstration in Duisburg. Germany's top security official said the government will support a bid by the country's 16 states to ban the country's biggest far-right party but will not file a separate request for a ban itself. Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich said the cabinet decided Wednesday, March 20, 2013 it was "not necessary" to file its own request to ban the National Democratic Party, or NPD, with the Federal Constitutional Court. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/28/2013 4:14:36 PM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken February 27, 2012. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken February 27, 2012. REUTERS/Mark Hindell/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/28/2013 4:14:36 PM EST
    Two Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/28/2013 4:14:36 PM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/28/2013 4:14:36 PM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
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              Former U.S. President Bill Clinton, left,  and former Nigeria President, Olusegun Obasanjo, right, attend the annual ThisDay awards ceremony, in Abeokuta, Nigeria, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 201

    Former U.S. President Bill Clinton, left, and former Nigeria President, Olusegun Obasanjo, right, attend the annual ThisDay awards ceremony, in Abeokuta, Nigeria, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 201

    Posted: 2/26/2013 12:03:31 PM EST
    Former U.S. President Bill Clinton, left, and former Nigeria President, Olusegun Obasanjo, right, attend the annual ThisDay awards ceremony, in Abeokuta, Nigeria, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. Former U.S. President Bill Clinton said Tuesday that Nigeria must do more to alleviate the extreme poverty across the nation's predominantly Muslim north in order to halt the wave of bombings, shootings and kidnappings by Islamic extremists there. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
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              Former U.S. President Bill Clinton attends the annual ThisDay awards ceremony, in Abeokuta, Nigeria, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. Former U.S. President Bill Clinton said Tuesday that Nigeria

    Former U.S. President Bill Clinton attends the annual ThisDay awards ceremony, in Abeokuta, Nigeria, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. Former U.S. President Bill Clinton said Tuesday that Nigeria

    Posted: 2/26/2013 12:03:31 PM EST
    Former U.S. President Bill Clinton attends the annual ThisDay awards ceremony, in Abeokuta, Nigeria, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013. Former U.S. President Bill Clinton said Tuesday that Nigeria must do more to alleviate the extreme poverty across the nation's predominantly Muslim north in order to halt the wave of bombings, shootings and kidnappings by Islamic extremists there. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it sleeps on an island in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken February 27, 2012. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken February 27, 2012. REUTERS/Mark Hindell/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads as they swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    Two Southern Ocean elephant seals wearing sensors on their heads swim in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout
  •  - Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Handout photo of a Southern Ocean elephant seal wearing a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Posted: 2/26/2013 4:22:07 AM EST
    A Southern Ocean elephant seal wears a sensor on its head as it swims in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica in this handout photo taken March 9, 2011. Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate. The tagged seals, along with sophisticated satellite data and moorings in ocean canyons, all played a role in providing data from the extreme Antarctic environment, where observations are very rare and ships could not go, said researchers at the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystem CRC in Tasmania. The sensor weighs about 100 to 200 grams and has a small satellite relay which transmits data on a daily basis. Picture taken March 9, 2011. REUTERS/Iain Field/Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC/Handout