Expense Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:42:40 AM EST
    People ride on a moped past a demolished house at Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION POLITICS)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 8/31/2011 8:41:25 PM EST
    A boy runs as tyres burn in the background during a protest at the Boeung Kak lake area in Phnom Penh, by residents facing eviction after they were denied land promised to them in return for making way for a Chinese development project in this August 23, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
  •  - To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 8/31/2011 8:30:08 PM EST
    Residents of Boeung Kak Lake facing eviction from their homes, react during a protest near the Chinese embassy in Phnom Penh, appealing for help in getting fair compensation from a Chinese firm involved in a real estate development at the lake in this January 17, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
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    Posted: 8/22/2011 1:05:51 PM EST
    In this photo taken Friday, July 29, 2011, the Coast Guard's newest ship, Coast Guard National Security Cutter Stratton (WMSL 752), is seen during construction at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Miss. Coast Guard Commandant Robert J. Papp Jr., not shown, toured the ship and said the Coast Guard is in a position of spending more money than budgeted for expensive and time-consuming repairs on older ships. ?We are far surpassing the amount that we get in our budget to do routine maintenance on these ships, so that comes at the expense of doing maintenance to our newer ships.? (AP Photo/Kerry Maloney)
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    Posted: 8/17/2011 8:15:45 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2010 file photo, a shopper browses for items in a BJ's store in Portland, Maine. BJ's Wholesale Club Inc.'s second-quarter net income rose 28 percent as it made more money from membership fees Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011. It was also helped by favorable merchandise margins and better-than-expected expense controls. (AP Photo/Pat Wellenbach, file)
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    Posted: 8/16/2011 2:50:51 PM EST
    In this May 16, 2011 photo, the Wal-Mart logo is displayed in Springfield, Ill. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2011, its second-quarter profit rose 5.7 percent, fueled by strong international sales and expense cutting. But the world's largest retailer still wasn't able to reverse a two-year U.S. sales slump. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
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    Posted: 8/16/2011 2:50:45 PM EST
    In this June 20, 2011 photo, a Wal-Mart worker pulls carts at a Wal-Mart store in Pittsburg, Calif. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2011, its second-quarter profit rose 5.7 percent, fueled by strong international sales and expense cutting. But the world's largest retailer still wasn't able to reverse a two-year U.S. sales slump. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
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    Posted: 8/11/2011 4:10:46 PM EST
    In this Aug. 8, 2011 photo, shoppers enter and exit the Kohl's store in San Rafael, Calif. Kohl?s Corp. is reporting that its second-quarter profits rose 17 percent Thursday, Aug. 11, as the mid-brow department store chain?s expense controls and success in its store-label brands offset modest revenue growth. The company says it?s increasing its profit guidance. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
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    Posted: 7/22/2011 11:30:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 18, 2007 file photo, Peter Brownlie, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri, speaks at a news conference in Kansas City. For pregnant women in Kansas who want an abortion after 21 weeks, that could mean a trip to Colorado or New Mexico. "Some people will probably just give up _ the logistics, the expense seems overwhelming," Brownlie said. "But in general, if women have decided the best thing for their family is to end a pregnancy, they will go to great lengths to do so." (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, Rich Sugg)
  •  - Flags erected for the African Union Summit line the roadside in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo

    Flags erected for the African Union Summit line the roadside in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo

    Posted: 6/28/2011 6:33:59 PM EST
    Flags erected for the African Union Summit line the roadside in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo, June 28, 2011. Turkish and Chinese workers put finishing touches on towering new buildings as delegations of dignitaries sweep up a gleaming, flag-draped six-lane highway and a navy warship lurks just offshore. Equatorial Guinea is racing to prepare for this year's African Union summit, starting on Thursday, which it hopes will mark its arrival on the continent's big stage, but which critics complain has turned into an outlandish expense eating up funds that should have been spent on the country's poor. REUTERS/David Lewis (EQUATORIAL GUINEA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Three luxury presidential villas built for the African Union Summit line the roadside in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo

    Three luxury presidential villas built for the African Union Summit line the roadside in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo

    Posted: 6/28/2011 5:18:59 PM EST
    Three luxury presidential villas built for the African Union Summit line the roadside in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo June 28, 2011. Equatorial Guinea is racing to prepare for this year's African Union summit, starting on Thursday, which it hopes will mark its arrival on the continent's big stage, but which critics complain has turned into an outlandish expense eating up funds that should have been spent on the country's poor. REUTERS/David Lewis (EQUATORIAL GUINEA - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - A youth watches a game of Eton Fives on a court styled based on an English public school's chapel, at a park in the northern Nigerian city of Katsina

    A youth watches a game of Eton Fives on a court styled based on an English public school's chapel, at a park in the northern Nigerian city of Katsina

    Posted: 6/28/2011 4:34:35 AM EST
    A youth watches a game of Eton Fives on a court styled based on an English public school's chapel, at a park in the northern Nigerian city of Katsina April 17, 2011. Introduced nearly a century ago by a former pupil of Eton College, this peculiar form of handball pulls in the crowds in impoverished Nigeria. In England, the game is played mostly by former or current public schoolboys who wear custom-made, padded gloves to smash a hard ball around a three-sided walled court reproduced in the mould of the original school ground. Nigerians forgo the expense of gloves and make do with a tennis ball but the court retains the obstacles and idiosyncrasies that make a simple game into a skilful sport. Picture taken April 17, 2011. REUTERS/Joe Brock (
  •  - A youth watches a game of Eton Fives on a court styled based on an English public school's chapel, at a park in the northern Nigerian city of Katsina

    A youth watches a game of Eton Fives on a court styled based on an English public school's chapel, at a park in the northern Nigerian city of Katsina

    Posted: 6/28/2011 4:34:09 AM EST
    A youth watches a game of Eton Fives on a court styled based on an English public school's chapel, at a park in the northern Nigerian city of Katsina April 17, 2011. Introduced nearly a century ago by a former pupil of Eton College, this peculiar form of handball pulls in the crowds in impoverished Nigeria. In England, the game is played mostly by former or current public schoolboys who wear custom-made, padded gloves to smash a hard ball around a three-sided walled court reproduced in the mould of the original school ground. Nigerians forgo the expense of gloves and make do with a tennis ball but the court retains the obstacles and idiosyncrasies that make a simple game into a skilful sport. Picture taken April 17, 2011. REUTERS/Joe Brock (
  •  - To match Feature NIGERIA/ETON FIVES

    To match Feature NIGERIA/ETON FIVES

    Posted: 6/28/2011 4:23:51 AM EST
    A youth watches a game of Eton Fives on a court styled based on an English public school's chapel, at a park in the northern Nigerian city of Katsina April 17, 2011. Introduced nearly a century ago by a former pupil of Eton College, this peculiar form of handball pulls in the crowds in impoverished Nigeria. In England, the game is played mostly by former or current public schoolboys who wear custom-made, padded gloves to smash a hard ball around a three-sided walled court reproduced in the mould of the original school ground. Nigerians forgo the expense of gloves and make do with a tennis ball but the court retains the obstacles and idiosyncrasies that make a simple game into a skilful sport. Picture taken April 17, 2011. To match Feature NIGERIA/ETON FIVES REUTERS/Joe Brock (NIGERIA - Tags: SPORT)
  •  - To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    Posted: 5/17/2011 10:58:08 AM EST
    Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the barrel room of the Diageo owned Dalwhinnie distillery in Dalwhinnie, in the Scottish highlands, May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples in China, where whisky exports were up 24 percent in 2010. It now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold there, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Reuters
  •  - To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    Posted: 5/17/2011 10:54:12 AM EST
    Workers walk near some of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland, in this March 1, 2011 file photo. Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples in China, where whisky exports were up 24 percent in 2010. It now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold there, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA To match Life! CHINA-WHISKY REUTERS/David
  •  - To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    Posted: 5/17/2011 10:46:18 AM EST
    A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland, in this March 24, 2011 file photo. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples in China, where whisky exports were up 24 percent in 2010. It now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold there, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt
  •  - To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    Posted: 5/17/2011 10:40:29 AM EST
    A billboard advertisement for Chivas Regal is seen on a street in Shanghai in this December 7, 2010 file photo. From crowded Shanghai bars to the beaches of the southern Chinese island of Hainan, Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples. Whisky exports to China were up 24 percent in 2010. Whisky now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. Picture taken December 7, 2010. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
  •  - To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    Posted: 5/17/2011 10:38:16 AM EST
    A man pours from a Chivas branded jug at a bar in a nightclub in Shanghai in this February 25, 2010 file photo. From crowded Shanghai bars to the beaches of the southern Chinese island of Hainan, Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples. Whisky exports to China were up 24 percent in 2010. Whisky now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY)
  •  - To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA

    Posted: 5/17/2011 10:34:02 AM EST
    Bottles of whisky are displayed at a supermarket in Shanghai in this March 9, 2011 file photo. From crowded Shanghai bars to the beaches of the southern Chinese island of Hainan, Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples. Whisky exports to China were up 24 percent in 2010. Whisky now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)


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