Expense Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 12/14/2011 10:35:49 AM EST
    In this artist's rendering provided by Stratolaunch Systems, a planned plane that would launch cargo and astronauts into space is seen. Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and aerospace pioneer Burt Rutan are building the plane, in the latest of several ventures fueled by technology tycoons clamoring to write America's next chapter in spaceflight. Their plans, unveiled Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2011, in Seattle, call for a twin-fuselage aircraft with wings longer than a football field to carry a rocket high into the atmosphere and drop it, avoiding the need for a launch pad and the expense of additional rocket fuel. Allen, who teamed up with Rutan in 2004 to send the first privately financed, manned spacecraft into space, said his new project would "keep America at the forefront of space exploration" and give a new generation of children something to dream about. (AP Photo/Strautolaunch Systems)
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    Posted: 11/15/2011 1:55:47 PM EST
    In this Tuesday Nov.8, 2011 photo, former Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, wearing a head and neck brace, poses following an interview with a local reoporter at her residence in suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. On Wednesday Nov. 9, 2011, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, offered to fly in foreign doctors on government's expense to examine Arroyo after barring her from treatment abroad while facing complaints of abuse of office. Aquino said his administration will foot the bill for her bone biopsy in the Philippines. (AP Photo/Manila Standard Today) PHILIPPINES OUT MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 11/15/2011 1:55:47 PM EST
    In this Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011 photo, former Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, wearing a head and neck brace, sits down for an interview with a local reporter at her residence in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines. On Wednesday Nov. 9, 2011, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, offered to fly in foreign doctors on government's expense to examine Arroyo after barring her from treatment abroad while facing complaints of abuse of office. Aquino said his administration will foot the bill for her bone biopsy in the Philippines. (AP Photo/Manila Standard Today) PHILIPPINES OUT MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 11/15/2011 6:50:48 AM EST
    In this Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011 photo, former Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, wearing a head and neck brace, reacts during an interview with a local reporter at her residence in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines.. On Wednesday Nov. 9, 2011, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, offered to fly in foreign doctors on government's expense to examine Arroyo after barring her from treatment abroad while facing complaints of abuse of office. Aquino said his administration will foot the bill for her bone biopsy in the Philippines. (AP Photo/Manila Standard Today) PHILIPPINES OUT MANDATORY CREDIT
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    Posted: 10/26/2011 9:35:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 22, 2011 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, businessman Herman Cain speaks in Des Moines, Iowa. The flat tax is making a comeback among Republican presidential candidates. Most of the contenders _Mitt Romney's an exception _ offer a variation of the tax plan under which everyone pays the same rate. But a flat tax faces tough opposition in Congress because it tends to favor the rich at the expense of others. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
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    Posted: 10/26/2011 9:35:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2011 file photo, Republican Presidential candidate, Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks in Gray Court, S.C. The flat tax is making a comeback among Republican presidential candidates. Most of the contenders _Mitt Romney's an exception _ offer a variation of the tax plan under which everyone pays the same rate. But a flat tax faces tough opposition in Congress because it tends to favor the rich at the expense of others. (AP Photo/ Richard Shiro, File)
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    Posted: 10/26/2011 9:35:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 13, 2011 file photo, Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks in Redmond, Wash. The flat tax is making a comeback among Republican presidential candidates. Most of the contenders _Mitt Romney's an exception _ offer a variation of the tax plan under which everyone pays the same rate. But a flat tax faces tough opposition in Congress because it tends to favor the rich at the expense of others. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
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    Posted: 10/26/2011 4:35:46 PM EST
    House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011. The flat tax is making a comeback among Republican presidential candidates. Most of the contenders _Mitt Romney's an exception _ offer a variation of the tax plan under which everyone pays the same rate. But a flat tax faces tough opposition in Congress because it tends to favor the rich at the expense of others. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  •  - Janusz Palikot from Palikot's Movement Party, raises his hand next to his partner Monika Kubat after the election results announcement in Warsaw

    Janusz Palikot from Palikot's Movement Party, raises his hand next to his partner Monika Kubat after the election results announcement in Warsaw

    Posted: 10/10/2011 7:10:14 AM EST
    Janusz Palikot (L) from Palikot's Movement Party raises his hand next to his partner Monika Kubat after the election results announcement in Warsaw, October 9, 2011.The main surprise of the election was the rise of a new liberal grouping, Palikot's Movement, which the exit poll showed winning 9.9 percent, much of it at the expense of the former communists. Palikot, its founder, is a wealthy businessman and former PO lawmaker whose attacks on the powerful Roman Catholic Church and championing of causes such as gay rights and legalization of soft drugs struck a chord among young voters. Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk claimed victory in Sunday's election after exit polls showed his ruling centre-right Civic Platform party (PO) nearly 10 points ahead of his nearest rival. REUTERS/Krzysztof Miller/Agencja Gazeta (POLAND - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS
  •  - Janusz Palikot kisses his partner Monika Kubat after the election results announcement in Warsaw

    Janusz Palikot kisses his partner Monika Kubat after the election results announcement in Warsaw

    Posted: 10/10/2011 7:09:06 AM EST
    Janusz Palikot (L) from Palikot's Movement Party, kisses his partner Monika Kubat, after the election results announcement in Warsaw, October 9, 2011. The main surprise of the election was the rise of a new liberal grouping, Palikot's Movement, which the exit poll showed winning 9.9 percent, much of it at the expense of the former communists. Palikot, its founder, is a wealthy businessman and former PO lawmaker whose attacks on the powerful Roman Catholic Church and championing of causes such as gay rights and legalization of soft drugs struck a chord among young voters. Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk claimed victory in Sunday's election after exit polls showed his ruling centre-right Civic Platform party (PO) nearly 10 points ahead of his nearest rival. REUTERS/Krzysztof Miller/Agencja Gazeta (POLAND - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED,
  •  - Bodzicz of Poland gestures during a protest in Bucharest

    Bodzicz of Poland gestures during a protest in Bucharest

    Posted: 10/9/2011 10:41:56 AM EST
    Tomasz Bodzicz of Poland gestures as he sits in the back of a truck in front of Poland's embassy, during a protest in Bucharest October 9, 2011. Bodzicz was protesting against the decision made by the Polish electoral authorities to exclude Nowa Prawica party from the nationwide electoral list. He offered sausages and drinks to passers-by as a symbol of electoral bribe. The banner reads: "Mobile Vote Buying Point - We live at the expense of your children and grandchildren. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS FOOD CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Bodzicz of Poland holds a bottle of vodka and a plate with sausages during a protest in Bucharest

    Bodzicz of Poland holds a bottle of vodka and a plate with sausages during a protest in Bucharest

    Posted: 10/9/2011 10:41:00 AM EST
    Tomasz Bodzicz of Poland holds a bottle of vodka and a plate with sausages as he sits in the back of a truck in front of Poland's embassy, during a protest in Bucharest October 9, 2011. Bodzicz was protesting against the decision made by the Polish electoral authorities to exclude Nowa Prawica party from the nationwide electoral list. He offered sausages and drinks to passers-by as a symbol of electoral bribe. The banner reads: "Mobile Vote Buying Point - We live at the expense of your children and grandchildren. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS FOOD CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Bodzicz of Poland talks with a passer-by during a protest in Bucharest

    Bodzicz of Poland talks with a passer-by during a protest in Bucharest

    Posted: 10/9/2011 10:35:42 AM EST
    Tomasz Bodzicz of Poland talks with a passer-by as he sits in the back of a truck in front of Poland's embassy, during a protest in Bucharest October 9, 2011. Bodzicz was protesting against the decision made by the Polish electoral authorities to exclude Nowa Prawica party from the nationwide electoral list. He offered sausages and drinks to passers-by as a symbol of electoral bribe. The banner reads: "Mobile Vote Buying Point - We live at the expense of your children and grandchildren. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS ELECTIONS FOOD)
  •  - Bodzicz of Poland opens a bottle of vodka in a traditional style during a protest in Bucharest

    Bodzicz of Poland opens a bottle of vodka in a traditional style during a protest in Bucharest

    Posted: 10/9/2011 10:32:56 AM EST
    Tomasz Bodzicz of Poland opens a bottle of vodka in a traditional style as he sits in the back of a truck in front of Poland's embassy, during a protest in Bucharest October 9, 2011. Bodzicz was protesting against the decision made by the Polish electoral authorities to exclude Nowa Prawica party from the nationwide electoral list. He offered sausages and drinks to passers-by as a symbol of electoral bribe. The banner reads: "Mobile Vote Buying Point - We live at the expense of your children and grandchildren. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS ELECTIONS FOOD TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
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    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:51:47 AM EST
    Children play on pipes used to pump sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project, in front of the Council of Ministers building in Phnom Penh in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
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    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:50:21 AM EST
    A boy is seen through a pipe used to pump sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
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    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:49:04 AM EST
    People are seen behind a demolished house at the Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION POLITICS REAL ESTATE)
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    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:47:17 AM EST
    Children cool off in the waters of Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
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    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:46:10 AM EST
    A girl walks on a pipe used to pump sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION REAL ESTATE POLITICS)
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    To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/

    Posted: 9/1/2011 12:44:16 AM EST
    People cast fishing nets near pipes used to pump out sand to fill Boeung Kak Lake in Phnom Penh, where residents are facing eviction to make way for a Chinese development project in this August 31, 2011 file photo. A foreign investment boom in Cambodia has come at the expense of what rights groups estimate is about 30,000 Cambodians forcibly evicted from their homes a year. The evictions and so-called "land grabs" have angered donors, putting at stake hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign aid as well as a trade scheme that gives Cambodian produce tariff-free access to the European Union. Most legal documents were destroyed when land ownership was abolished under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge regime, leaving millions of Cambodians without title deeds in a legal grey-zone. To match feature CAMBODIA-EVICTIONS/ REUTERS/Samrang Pring/Files (CAMBODIA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS REAL ESTATE)