Expense Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/

    To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/

    Posted: 5/30/2012 2:36:37 AM EST
    Jay Chau, vice chairman of the Hong Kong Kiteboarding Federation, takes part in a training session at Shui Hau Wan at Hong Kong's Lantau Island May 12, 2012. The International Sailing Federation (ISAF) announced the decision to include men's and women's kiteboarding at the expense of windsurfing earlier this month, describing it as a "fantastic addition" for the Games in Rio de Janeiro. Picture taken May 12, 2012. To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS)
  •  - To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/

    To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/

    Posted: 5/30/2012 2:35:35 AM EST
    Jay Chau, vice chairman of the Hong Kong Kiteboarding Federation, takes part in a training session at Shui Hau Wan at Hong Kong's Lantau Island May 12, 2012. The International Sailing Federation (ISAF) announced the decision to include men's and women's kiteboarding at the expense of windsurfing earlier this month, describing it as a "fantastic addition" for the Games in Rio de Janeiro. Picture taken May 12, 2012. To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS)
  •  - To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/

    To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/

    Posted: 5/30/2012 2:35:02 AM EST
    Jay Chau, vice chairman of the Hong Kong Kiteboarding Federation, takes part in a training session at Shui Hau Wan at Hong Kong's Lantau Island May 12, 2012. The International Sailing Federation (ISAF) announced the decision to include men's and women's kiteboarding at the expense of windsurfing earlier this month, describing it as a "fantastic addition" for the Games in Rio de Janeiro. Picture taken May 12, 2012. To match OLY KITE 2016 CHINA/ REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS)
  •  - To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/

    To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/

    Posted: 5/23/2012 10:19:43 AM EST
    A general view shows the Acibadem hospital in Istanbul May 15, 2012. Growth capital and buyout funds from the wealthy Gulf Arab region are being drawn towards Turkey's stable and growing economy at the expense of countries like Egypt and Bahrain, still prey to the violence of the Arab Spring popular revolts. In January, Dubai-based Abraaj sold its 50 percent stake in Turkish hospital group Acibadem to Malaysia's state-linked investor fund Khazanah Nasional and its healthcare unit in a deal that valued the company at $1.68 billion. Picture taken May 15, 2012. To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/ REUTERS/Osman Orsal (TURKEY - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH)
  •  - To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/

    To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/

    Posted: 5/23/2012 10:19:15 AM EST
    A view shows the Acibadem hospital in Istanbul May 15, 2012. Growth capital and buyout funds from the wealthy Gulf Arab region are being drawn towards Turkey's stable and growing economy at the expense of countries like Egypt and Bahrain, still prey to the violence of the Arab Spring popular revolts. In January, Dubai-based Abraaj sold its 50 percent stake in Turkish hospital group Acibadem to Malaysia's state-linked investor fund Khazanah Nasional and its healthcare unit in a deal that valued the company at $1.68 billion. Picture taken May 15, 2012. To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/ REUTERS/Osman Orsal (TURKEY - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH)
  •  - To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/

    To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/

    Posted: 5/23/2012 10:18:45 AM EST
    A general view shows the Acibadem hospital in Istanbul May 15, 2012. Growth capital and buyout funds from the wealthy Gulf Arab region are being drawn towards Turkey's stable and growing economy at the expense of countries like Egypt and Bahrain, still prey to the violence of the Arab Spring popular revolts. In January, Dubai-based Abraaj sold its 50 percent stake in Turkish hospital group Acibadem to Malaysia's state-linked investor fund Khazanah Nasional and its healthcare unit in a deal that valued the company at $1.68 billion. Picture taken May 15, 2012. To match story TURKEY-PRIVATE-EQUITY/ REUTERS/Osman Orsal (TURKEY - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 5/16/2012 2:25:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2008 file photo, Cuyahoga County prosecutor Bill Mason answers during a news conference in Cleveland. Mason pursues dozens of offenders on capital charges each year at added expense to taxpayers and at the risk of some defendants ending up on death row for charges that would be minor elsewhere. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
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    Posted: 5/1/2012 6:35:47 PM EST
    FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012 file photo shows the grill of a 2012 Chrysler 200 in a showroom in South Burlington, Vt. Toyota and Chrysler saw big U.S. sales gains in April, but they came at the expense of General Motors and Ford. Automakers reported their sales Tuesday, May 1, 2012. Chrysler posted a 20-percent rise in sales. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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    Posted: 5/1/2012 6:35:47 PM EST
    This Feb. 19, 2012 file photo shows a line of 2012 Prius sedans at a Toyota dealership in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo. Toyota and Chrysler saw big U.S. sales gains in April 2012, but they came at the expense of General Motors and Ford. Toyota said its sales rose 12 percent as its inventories finally return to pre-earthquake levels. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
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    Posted: 4/30/2012 8:45:45 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 29, 2012 file photo, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks in Manchester, N.J. Christie says having a sexy television star seated beside him made it easier to absorb the fat jokes Jimmy Kimmel made at his expense during the White House Correspondents' Association dinner. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
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    Posted: 4/29/2012 11:20:45 PM EST
    In this April 23, 2012, photo Freddie Wooten stands in front of the storm shelter he built at his own expense in Henager, Ala., following the 2011 tornado. When deadly twisters chewed through the Midwest and South in 2011, thousands of people in the killers' paths had nowhere to hide. Now many of those families are taking an unusual extra step to be ready next time: adding tornado shelters to their homes. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
  •  - Greek extreme right election campain

    Greek extreme right election campain

    Posted: 4/26/2012 4:16:49 PM EST
    Katerina Karousi, a 76-year old cancer patient and former Socialist voter, breaks down in sobs inside her burned-out home April 20, 2012. Earlier Golden Dawn extreme right party members brought food for her and her 79-year old husband Andreas Karoussis. The couple lives in an apartment badly damaged in a fire last year, unable to afford repairs on Karoussis' 729-euro per month pension. In 2009, Golden Dawn took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and other lenders. Picture taken April 20, 2012.
  •  - Students shout slogans during a protest against spending cuts in public education in Almeria

    Students shout slogans during a protest against spending cuts in public education in Almeria

    Posted: 4/25/2012 7:15:17 PM EST
    Students shout slogans during a protest against spending cuts in public education in Almeria, southeast Spain, April 25, 2012. The placard reads "Listen, education is not an expense it's an investment". REUTERS/Francisco Bonilla (SPAIN - Tags: EDUCATION CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Karousi, a former Socialist voter, looks at Christian icons as she stands next to her husband inside their home in Athens

    Karousi, a former Socialist voter, looks at Christian icons as she stands next to her husband inside their home in Athens

    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:31:22 AM EST
    Katerina Karousi, a 76-year old cancer patient and former Socialist voter, looks at Christian icons as she stands next to her husband inside their home in Athens April 20, 2012. Earlier, Golden Dawn extreme right party members brought bags of food for her and her 79-year old husband, Andreas Karoussis. The couple live in an apartment badly damaged in a fire last year, unable to afford repairs on Karoussis' 729-euro per month pension. In 2009, Golden Dawn took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and
  •  - Karousi, a former Socialist voter, is reflected in a mirror next to her husband inside their home in Athens

    Karousi, a former Socialist voter, is reflected in a mirror next to her husband inside their home in Athens

    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:29:15 AM EST
    Katerina Karousi, a 76-year old cancer patient and former Socialist voter, is reflected in a mirror next to her husband inside their home in Athens April 20, 2012. Earlier, Golden Dawn extreme right party members brought bags of food for her and her 79-year old husband, Andreas Karoussis. The couple live in an apartment badly damaged in a fire last year, unable to afford repairs on Karoussis' 729-euro per month pension. In 2009, Golden Dawn took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and other
  •  - Karousi, former Socialist voter, breaks down in tears as Golden Dawn extreme right party members unload bags of food for her and her husband in Athens

    Karousi, former Socialist voter, breaks down in tears as Golden Dawn extreme right party members unload bags of food for her and her husband in Athens

    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:26:09 AM EST
    Katerina Karousi, a 76-year-old cancer patient and former Socialist voter, breaks down in tears outside her home as Golden Dawn extreme right party members unload bags of food for her and her 79-year-old husband, Andreas Karoussis, in Athens April 20, 2012. The couple live in an apartment badly damaged in a fire last year, and are unable to afford repairs on Karoussis' 729-euro per month pension. In 2009, Golden Dawn took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and other lenders. Picture taken April
  •  - A member of the Golden Dawn extreme right party rings a door bell in Athens

    A member of the Golden Dawn extreme right party rings a door bell in Athens

    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:23:18 AM EST
    A member of the Golden Dawn extreme right party rings a door bell during a food and clothes distribution to poor families in Athens April 20, 2012. In 2009, Golden Dawn took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and other lenders. Picture taken April 20, 2012.REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS)
  •  - Karousi, a former Socialist voter, is reflected in a mirror inside her home in Athens

    Karousi, a former Socialist voter, is reflected in a mirror inside her home in Athens

    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:14:59 AM EST
    Katerina Karousi, a 76-year old cancer patient and former Socialist voter, is reflected in a mirror inside her home in Athens April 20, 2012. Earlier, Golden Dawn extreme right party members brought bags of food for her and her 79-year old husband Andreas Karoussis. The couple live in an apartment badly damaged in a fire last year, unable to afford repairs on Karoussis' 729-euro per month pension. In 2009, Golden Dawn took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and other lenders. Picture taken April
  •  - Members of the extreme right Golden Dawn party hold flags bearing their party's logo during an election campaign rally in Athens

    Members of the extreme right Golden Dawn party hold flags bearing their party's logo during an election campaign rally in Athens

    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:09:07 AM EST
    Members of the extreme right Golden Dawn party hold flags bearing their party's logo during an election campaign rally in Athens April 21, 2012. In 2009, the group took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and other lenders. Picture taken April 21, 2012.REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS)
  •  - Panagiotaros, spokesperson for Golden Dawn party, and other party members shout during an election campaign gathering in Athens

    Panagiotaros, spokesperson for Golden Dawn party, and other party members shout during an election campaign gathering in Athens

    Posted: 4/25/2012 11:06:11 AM EST
    Elias Panagiotaros, a spokesperson for the extreme right Golden Dawn party (2nd R), and other members of the group shout insults against a Socialist former education minister during an election campaign gathering in Athens April 21, 2012. In 2009, the group took just 0.23 percent of the vote, this time; polls show it taking between 4.1 and 5.7 percent. Much of that has come at the expense of the far-right LAOS party, whose ratings plummeted after it joined technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos' pro-bailout coalition last year. The rise of Golden Dawn - which denies critics' labels as neo-Nazi - is all the more intriguing in a country proud of its World War II resistance against Nazi Germany and where anti-German sentiment still runs high over austerity measures demanded by Berlin and other lenders. Picture taken April 21, 2012. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis (GREECE)