Evolution Photos on Townhall

  •  - Lt. Col. Ladner briefs Senators Chuck Hagel, Barack Obama and Jack Reed about the evolution of the Humvee at Camp Arifjan Kuwait

    Lt. Col. Ladner briefs Senators Chuck Hagel, Barack Obama and Jack Reed about the evolution of the Humvee at Camp Arifjan Kuwait

    Posted: 7/21/2008 11:47:03 AM EST
    Lt. Col. Joseph E. Ladner (R), commander 2nd Battalion, 401st Army Field Support Brigade, briefs (L to R) Senator Chuck Hagel (R-NE), Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) and Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) about the evolution of the Humvee at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, July 18, 2008. Picture taken July 18, 2008. REUTERS/Jim Hinnant/401st Army Field Support Brigade/Handout (KUWAIT). FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.
  •  - A woman walks amidst the rubble of destroyed courtyard houses in Beijing

    A woman walks amidst the rubble of destroyed courtyard houses in Beijing

    Posted: 7/6/2008 10:44:35 PM EST
    A woman walks amidst the rubble of destroyed courtyard houses in Beijing July 6, 2008. Courtyard houses, known as "Siheyuan" in Chinese, used to be one of Beijing's most distinctive features, with families living in rooms surrounding a central courtyard and their elaborate entrances lining alleyways, called "hutong", and criss-crossed the city. With Beijing's fast evolution into a modern metropolis, more and more hutongs are disappearing. Picture taken July 6, 2008. REUTERS/Christina Hu (CHINA)
  •  - Combination picture shows a worker demolishing the walls of courtyard houses in central Beijing

    Combination picture shows a worker demolishing the walls of courtyard houses in central Beijing

    Posted: 1/12/2008 5:22:02 AM EST
    Combination picture shows a worker demolishing the walls of courtyard houses in central Beijing January 12, 2008. The traditional courtyard houses, known as "siheyuan" in Chinese, are one of Beijing's most distinctive features, with families living in rooms surrounding a central courtyard and elaborate entrances. These traditional residences are joined together by alleys, known as "hutong", that criss-cross the entire city. With Beijing's fast evolution into a modern metropolis, more and more siheyuans are disappearing, local media reported. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)


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