Evolution Photos on Townhall

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              In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Zoe Shyba, 3, and Aidan Lain, 7,  play  "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop  in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV",  launch

    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Zoe Shyba, 3, and Aidan Lain, 7, play "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launch

    Posted: 9/18/2012 6:43:24 PM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Zoe Shyba, 3, and Aidan Lain, 7, play "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launching Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012, uses Kinect, a motion and voice-sensing controller created by Microsoft, to give Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the Sesame Street crew a chance to have a real two-way conversation with their pint-sized audience. The effort represents the next step in the evolution of television, adding an interactive element to what's still largely a passive, lean-back experience. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, Aidan Lain, 7, jumps while watching "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop  in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV",  launching Tuesday,  S

    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, Aidan Lain, 7, jumps while watching "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launching Tuesday, S

    Posted: 9/18/2012 6:43:24 PM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, Aidan Lain, 7, jumps while watching "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launching Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012, uses Kinect, a motion and voice-sensing controller created by Microsoft, to give Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the Sesame Street crew a chance to have a real two-way conversation with their pint-sized audience. The effort represents the next step in the evolution of television, adding an interactive element to what's still largely a passive, lean-back experience. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, Aidan Lain, 7, jumps while watching "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop  in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV",  launching Tuesday,  S

    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, Aidan Lain, 7, jumps while watching "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launching Tuesday, S

    Posted: 9/18/2012 6:43:24 PM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, Aidan Lain, 7, jumps while watching "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launching Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012, uses Kinect, a motion and voice-sensing controller created by Microsoft, to give Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the Sesame Street crew a chance to have a real two-way conversation with their pint-sized audience. The effort represents the next step in the evolution of television, adding an interactive element to what's still largely a passive, lean-back experience. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Zoe Shyba, 3, left, and Aidan Lain, 7,  play  "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop  in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV",

    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Zoe Shyba, 3, left, and Aidan Lain, 7, play "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV",

    Posted: 9/18/2012 6:43:24 PM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Zoe Shyba, 3, left, and Aidan Lain, 7, play "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launching Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012, uses Kinect, a motion and voice-sensing controller created by Microsoft, to give Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the Sesame Street crew a chance to have a real two-way conversation with their pint-sized audience. The effort represents the next step in the evolution of television, adding an interactive element to what's still largely a passive, lean-back experience. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Aidan Lain, 7, and Zoe Shyba, 3, play "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop  in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV",  launchin

    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Aidan Lain, 7, and Zoe Shyba, 3, play "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launchin

    Posted: 9/18/2012 6:43:24 PM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012, photo, from left, Aidan Lain, 7, and Zoe Shyba, 3, play "Kinect Sesame Street TV" at the Sesame Street Workshop in New York. "Kinect Sesame Street TV", launching Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012, uses Kinect, a motion and voice-sensing controller created by Microsoft, to give Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the Sesame Street crew a chance to have a real two-way conversation with their pint-sized audience. The effort represents the next step in the evolution of television, adding an interactive element to what's still largely a passive, lean-back experience. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              This undated image provided by Microsoft shows a graphic of the evolution of the company's logo from 1975 to 1987. Microsoft revealed a new corporate logo, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, the

    This undated image provided by Microsoft shows a graphic of the evolution of the company's logo from 1975 to 1987. Microsoft revealed a new corporate logo, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, the

    Posted: 8/23/2012 3:53:25 PM EST
    This undated image provided by Microsoft shows a graphic of the evolution of the company's logo from 1975 to 1987. Microsoft revealed a new corporate logo, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, the first revamp since February 1987. (AP Photo/Microsoft)
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              FILE - This Jan. 13, 2012, file photo shows former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during an interview in Ridgeland, Miss. Asked about the political evolution of the southern states Barb

    FILE - This Jan. 13, 2012, file photo shows former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during an interview in Ridgeland, Miss. Asked about the political evolution of the southern states Barb

    Posted: 8/19/2012 10:48:36 AM EST
    FILE - This Jan. 13, 2012, file photo shows former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during an interview in Ridgeland, Miss. Asked about the political evolution of the southern states Barbour, a Republican, former national party chairman and two-term governor, said the demographics are important but can be overemphasized. He acknowledged GOP concerns that Hispanics will vote Obama in proportions Romney cannot overcome “if the election for them is only about immigration”. But, he added, “Never mind that their unemployment is so much higher than the national average. ... If the election for them is about the economy, we can do well.” (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
  •  - A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich

    A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich

    Posted: 8/3/2012 3:38:14 AM EST
    A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich, August 9, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
  •  - A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich

    A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich

    Posted: 8/3/2012 1:30:39 AM EST
    A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich, August 9, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
  •  - A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich

    A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich

    Posted: 8/2/2012 3:36:51 AM EST
    A man walks past an information bilboard showing the evolution of the FTSE 100 index at the Swiss exchange in Zurich, August 9, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
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              This photo provided by Starbucks shows a new Evolution juice store in Bellevue, Wash. On Friday, July 20, 2012, Starbucks Corp. announced the opening of three new Evolution juice stores

    This photo provided by Starbucks shows a new Evolution juice store in Bellevue, Wash. On Friday, July 20, 2012, Starbucks Corp. announced the opening of three new Evolution juice stores

    Posted: 7/20/2012 4:03:50 PM EST
    This photo provided by Starbucks shows a new Evolution juice store in Bellevue, Wash. On Friday, July 20, 2012, Starbucks Corp. announced the opening of three new Evolution juice stores. The move is just the company’s latest push to expand beyond its ubiquitous coffee shops. (AP Photo/Starbucks)
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              This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a drawing of "The Evolution of Interstellar Flight" by the young Carl Sagan (c. 10-13 years old).  The Library of Co

    This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a drawing of "The Evolution of Interstellar Flight" by the young Carl Sagan (c. 10-13 years old). The Library of Co

    Posted: 6/27/2012 11:38:32 AM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a drawing of "The Evolution of Interstellar Flight" by the young Carl Sagan (c. 10-13 years old). The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of the late scientist and astronomer Carl Sagan, thanks to the generosity of a well-heeled admirer: “Family Guy” creator Seth MacFarlane. The writer, director and actor is working on a follow-up to Sagan’s acclaimed “Cosmos” miniseries, which introduced a mass audience to the mysteries of the universe and the origins of life. MacFarlane says he was profoundly influenced by “Cosmos” and wants to draw attention to the need for continued exploration of space and study of astronomy. (AP Photo/Library of Congress)
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    Posted: 6/12/2012 4:50:47 PM EST
    A billboard in Louisville, Ky., shows a new ad campaign for the Creation Museum, on June 11, 2012. A new nationwide billboard ad campaign is using dinosaurs to attract visitors to the Bible-based center near Cincinnati. The museum has exhibits that challenge evolution science and promote a literal interpretation of the Old Testament's creation story. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan)
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    Posted: 6/12/2012 4:50:47 PM EST
    A billboard in Louisville, Ky., shows a new ad campaign for the Creation Museum, on June 11, 2012. A new nationwide billboard ad campaign is using dinosaurs to attract visitors to the Bible-based center near Cincinnati. The museum has exhibits that challenge evolution science and promote a literal interpretation of the Old Testament's creation story. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan)
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    Posted: 5/28/2012 7:00:47 AM EST
    In this 1972 photo provided by the Turkana Basin Institute, paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey recovers skull fragments of a Homo habilis specimen not far from the present site of the Turkana Basin Institute's Ileret research facility in northern Kenya. Leakey predicts skepticism over evolution will soon be history sometime in the next 15 to 30 years. "If you get to the stage where you can persuade people on the evidence, that it's solid, that we are all African, that color is superficial, that stages of development of culture are all interactive," Leakey says, "then I think we have a chance of a world that will respond better to global challenges." (AP Photo/Turkana Basin Institute, Bob Campbell)
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    Posted: 5/28/2012 7:00:47 AM EST
    In this May 2, 2012 photo provided by the Turkana Basin Institute, paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey, left, attends a fundraiser for the Turkana Basin Institute with his friend Paul Simon, who was the guest performer in New York. The Kenyan-born scientist, who serves as a professor at Stony Brook University on New York?s Long Island, just spent a month in New York raising funds for his Turkana Basin Institute in Kenya. Leakey predicts skepticism over evolution will soon be history sometime in the next 15 to 30 years. "If you get to the stage where you can persuade people on the evidence, that it's solid, that we are all African, that color is superficial, that stages of development of culture are all interactive," Leakey says, "then I think we have a chance of a world that will respond better to global challenges." (AP Photo/Ralph R. Smith)
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    Posted: 5/28/2012 7:00:46 AM EST
    In this 2008 photo provided by the Turkana Basin Institute, paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey discusses the evidence for human evolution over a collection of hominin fossil casts at the Turkana Basin Institute's Ileret research facility in northern Kenya. Leakey predicts skepticism over evolution will soon be history sometime in the next 15 to 30 years. "If you get to the stage where you can persuade people on the evidence, that it's solid, that we are all African, that color is superficial, that stages of development of culture are all interactive," Leakey says, "then I think we have a chance of a world that will respond better to global challenges." (AP Photo/Turkana Basin Institute, Bob Campbell)
  •  - To match RUSSIA-FASHION/SOVIET

    To match RUSSIA-FASHION/SOVIET

    Posted: 5/14/2012 11:30:50 AM EST
    People visit the "Fashion behind the Iron Curtain" exhibition in Moscow April 26, 2012. A sweeping new Moscow fashion exhibit illustrates the evolution of Soviet couture behind the Iron Curtain from the post World War One era to Perestroika. Picture taken April 26, 2012. To match RUSSIA-FASHION/SOVIET REUTERS/Nastassia Astrasheuskaya (RUSSIA - Tags: FASHION SOCIETY)
  •  - To match RUSSIA-FASHION/SOVIET

    To match RUSSIA-FASHION/SOVIET

    Posted: 5/14/2012 11:28:23 AM EST
    An employee keeps watch near exhibits at the "Fashion behind the Iron Curtain" exhibition in Moscow April 26, 2012. A sweeping new Moscow fashion exhibit illustrates the evolution of Soviet couture behind the Iron Curtain from the post World War One era to Perestroika. Picture taken April 26, 2012. To match RUSSIA-FASHION/SOVIET REUTERS/Nastassia Astrasheuskaya (RUSSIA - Tags: FASHION SOCIETY)
  •  - To match feature MIXED-MARTIAL-ARTS/WOMEN

    To match feature MIXED-MARTIAL-ARTS/WOMEN

    Posted: 4/11/2012 7:06:54 AM EST
    Referee declares Singapore's Nicole Chua (L) as winner as after she defeated India's Jeet Toshi in their One Fighting Championship (FC) mixed martial arts (MMA) fight at the Singapore Indoor Stadium in this March 31, 2012, file photo. While abhorred by its critics as a celebration of violence, mixed martial arts (MMA)'s explosive growth shows no signs of tapering off. It does not shy away from its violent image but rather embraces it as the ultimate sporting evolution of hand-to-hand combat. Some 8,000 fans watched Chua become the city-state's first female professional MMA fighter with her debut as part of ONE Fighting Championship's recent "War of the Lions" event. To match feature MIXED-MARTIAL-ARTS/WOMEN REUTERS/Tim Chong/Files (SINGAPORE - Tags: SPORT)