Ethanol Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match Special Report BIOFUELS/EUROPE

    To match Special Report BIOFUELS/EUROPE

    Posted: 7/5/2010 9:38:56 AM EST
    A worker walks along Sao Tome ethanol distillery in the southern Brazilian state of Parana March 11, 2006. Documents written between 2008 and January 2010 and sent between lobbyists, scientists and high-ranking European civil servants, released after Reuters invoked transparency laws, exposed a huge rift in Brussels over biofuels policy and also undermined Europe's ambition of using alternative fuels to wean the continent off oil by showing how vested interests have influenced the science behind a cornerstone of the continent's clean energy policy. Picture taken March 11, 2006. To match Special Report BIOFUELS/EUROPE REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files (BRAZIL - Tags: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - Supporters of Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir welcome him at the Kenana sugar factory in White Nile State

    Supporters of Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir welcome him at the Kenana sugar factory in White Nile State

    Posted: 6/10/2009 2:04:39 PM EST
    Supporters of Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir welcome him at the Kenana sugar factory in White Nile State, June 10, 2009, where he inaugurated a new ethanol factory. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallh (SUDAN ENERGY BUSINESS)
  •  - A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo

    A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo

    Posted: 4/29/2009 12:03:36 PM EST
    A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo April 29, 2009. Named the "Mix", the bike is a modified version of Honda's CG, a small motorcycle popular with couriers and commuters in Brazil. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL ETHANOL ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TRANSPORT BUSINESS ENERGY)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:05:42 PM EST
    A process operator pours ethanol into a bottle at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 8:52:05 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail.But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 8:46:11 PM EST
    A clerk attends to a customer at a UPI energy gas station in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 11, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail.But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - A worker fills up gasoline at a petrol station in Bangkok

    A worker fills up gasoline at a petrol station in Bangkok

    Posted: 5/28/2008 3:50:05 AM EST
    A worker fills up gasoline at a petrol station in Bangkok May 28, 2008. Thailand passed a tax incentive package on Tuesday to lure motorists and truckers to switch to ethanol or compressed natural gas from gasoline or diesel as the net crude oil importer seeks to counter soaring oil prices. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND)
  •  - Ethanol is measured for its alcoholic content at the Lincolnway Energy plant in Nevada, Iowa

    Ethanol is measured for its alcoholic content at the Lincolnway Energy plant in Nevada, Iowa

    Posted: 12/6/2007 8:06:09 PM EST
    Ethanol is measured for its relative water content and other factors in a lab at the Lincolnway Energy plant in the town of Nevada, Iowa, December 6, 2007. The company, one of a growing number across Iowa and the United States, converts corn to ethanol fuel to be used in flexible-fuelled vehicles as an alternative energy source to oil. The business operates around the clock seven days a week, processing approximately 50,000 bushels (1.27 tonnes) of corn daily, and creating 150,000 gallons (567,752 litres) of ethanol per day. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Truck driver Randy Walker fills his rig with biodiesel fuel in Nevada, Iowa

    Truck driver Randy Walker fills his rig with biodiesel fuel in Nevada, Iowa

    Posted: 12/6/2007 7:59:51 PM EST
    Truck driver Randy Walker fills his rig's tanks with biodiesel fuel at a gas station in the town of Nevada, Iowa, December 6, 2007. Nearby, the Lincolnway Energy company is converting corn to ethanol fuel to be used in flexible-fuelled vehicles as an alternative energy source to oil. The business operates around the clock seven days a week, processing approximately 50,000 bushels (1.27 tonnes) of corn daily, and creating 150,000 gallons (567,752 litres) of ethanol per day. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
  •  - U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon visits the Santa Adelia ethanol plant in Jaboticabal

    U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon visits the Santa Adelia ethanol plant in Jaboticabal

    Posted: 11/11/2007 4:31:58 PM EST
    U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (C) visits the sugar cane fields of the Santa Adelia ethanol plant in Jaboticabal, in the interior of Sao Paulo state, November 11, 2007. The ethanol plant is just one of Ban's stops on his South America visit as he prepares for a U.N. climate change conference in Bali, Indonesia, in December. REUTERS/Tuta Lima (BRAZIL)
  •  - Brazilian Batista drives a mechanized sugar cane harvester that cuts the cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis

    Brazilian Batista drives a mechanized sugar cane harvester that cuts the cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis

    Posted: 7/6/2007 10:49:52 PM EST
    Brazilian Melquiades Batista Soares drives a mechanized sugar cane harvester that cuts the cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis, about 300 kms (186 miles) northwest of Sao Paulo July 6, 2007. Batista, who until recently was employed in the hazardous job of manual cane harvesting, is one of those benefiting from the phasing out of hand cutting in favour of mechanized harvesting. REUTERS/Rickey Rogers (BRAZIL)
  •  - A mechanized sugar cane harvester loads onto giant bins cut cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis

    A mechanized sugar cane harvester loads onto giant bins cut cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis

    Posted: 7/6/2007 10:45:25 PM EST
    A mechanized sugar cane harvester loads onto giant bins cut cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis, about 300 kms (186 miles) northwest of Sao Paulo July 6, 2007. Manual cutting of sugar cane is quickly being phased out by this and other cane processors in Brazil in favour of mechanized harvesting equipment. REUTERS/Rickey Rogers (BRAZIL)
  •  - A worker cuts sugar cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis

    A worker cuts sugar cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis

    Posted: 7/6/2007 10:45:19 PM EST
    A worker cuts sugar cane for raw sugar and ethanol fuel production on the property of the Sao Martinho mill in Pradopolis, about 300 kms (186 miles) northwest of Sao Paulo July 6, 2007. Manual cutting of sugar cane is quickly being phased out by this and other cane processors in Brazil in favour of mechanized harvesting equipment. REUTERS/Rickey Rogers (BRAZIL)
  •  - Raul Castro, head of Cuba's armed forces and brother of Cuba's President Fidel Castro, attends event in Havana

    Raul Castro, head of Cuba's armed forces and brother of Cuba's President Fidel Castro, attends event in Havana

    Posted: 2/28/2007 10:23:54 PM EST
    Raul Castro, head of Cuba's armed forces and brother of Cuba's President Fidel Castro, attends a bilateral meeting between Cuba and Venezuela in Havana February 28, 2007. The two countries signed cooperation projects budgeted for this year at $1.5 billion, which includes the building of 11 ethanol plants in Venezuela with Cuban technology. REUTERS/Claudia Daut (CUBA)
  •  - U.S. President George W. Bush smells a bottle of ethanol as he tours Novozymes North America Inc. in Franklinton, North Carolina

    U.S. President George W. Bush smells a bottle of ethanol as he tours Novozymes North America Inc. in Franklinton, North Carolina

    Posted: 2/22/2007 1:09:51 PM EST
    U.S. President George W. Bush (R) smells a bottle of ethanol as he tours Novozymes North America Inc. with Mads Torry-Smith, group leader for the Biomass group, in Franklinton, North Carolina, February 22, 2007. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Protesters march on the streets of Mexico City

    Protesters march on the streets of Mexico City

    Posted: 1/31/2007 8:50:57 PM EST
    Protesters march on the streets of Mexico City January 31, 2007.Thousands of farmers and trade unionists protested against the rising price of tortillas, thin corn patties that are a staple of the Mexican diet. Soaring U.S. demand for ethanol fuel made from corn has pushed the grain to its highest prices in a decade. The banner reads "Without corn, there is no country". REUTERS/Henry Romero (MEXICO)
  •  - Protester holds up a Mexican flag during a march on the streets of Mexico City

    Protester holds up a Mexican flag during a march on the streets of Mexico City

    Posted: 1/31/2007 8:14:04 PM EST
    A protester (unseen) holds up a Mexican flag during a march on the streets of Mexico City January 31, 2007. Thousands of farmers and trade unionists protested against the rising price of tortillas, thin corn patties that are a staple of the Mexican diet. Soaring U.S. demand for ethanol fuel made from corn has pushed the grain to its highest prices in a decade. REUTERS/Henry Romero (MEXICO)
  •  - A pump for E85 ethanol alternative fuel is shown at the Hoover Public Safety Center in Hoover

    A pump for E85 ethanol alternative fuel is shown at the Hoover Public Safety Center in Hoover

    Posted: 9/28/2006 1:53:37 PM EST
    An E85 ethanol alternative fuel pump is shown at the Hoover Public Safety Center in Hoover, Alabama, September 28, 2006. U.S. President George W. Bush visited the facility to promote ethanol as an alternative fuel source, saying America needs to wean itself off foreign oil despite a recent drop in fuel prices. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
  •  - U.S. President Bush watches a police car being filled with E85 ethanol in Hoover

    U.S. President Bush watches a police car being filled with E85 ethanol in Hoover

    Posted: 9/28/2006 1:52:35 PM EST
    U.S. President George W. Bush (2nd L) and Alabama's Governor Bob Riley (L) watch as fleet technician Patrick Matthews fills up a police car with E85 ethanol alternative fuel at the Hoover Public Safety Center in Hoover, Alabama September 28, 2006. Bush promoted ethanol as an alternative fuel source, saying America needs to wean itself off foreign oil despite a recent drop in fuel prices. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
  •  - U.S. President Bush greets Alabama policeman Parker in Hoover

    U.S. President Bush greets Alabama policeman Parker in Hoover

    Posted: 9/28/2006 1:48:07 PM EST
    U.S. President George W. Bush (L) greets Alabama policeman Reggie Parker at a fuel station for E85 ethanol alternative fuel-powered vehicles at the Hoover Public Safety Center in Hoover, Alabama September 28, 2006. Bush promoted ethanol as an alternative fuel source, saying America needs to wean itself off foreign oil despite a recent drop in fuel prices. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)


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