Ethanol Photos on Townhall

  •  - A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo

    A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo

    Posted: 4/29/2009 12:03:36 PM EST
    A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo April 29, 2009. Named the "Mix", the bike is a modified version of Honda's CG, a small motorcycle popular with couriers and commuters in Brazil. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL ETHANOL ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TRANSPORT BUSINESS ENERGY)
  •  - A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo

    A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo

    Posted: 4/29/2009 12:01:41 PM EST
    A motorcycle that can run solely on sugar cane ethanol, gasoline or a mixture of both is displayed in Sao Paulo April 28, 2009. Named the "Mix", the bike is a modified version of Honda's CG, a small motorcycle popular with couriers and commuters in Brazil. Picture taken April 28, 2009. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL ETHANOL ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TRANSPORT BUSINESS ENERGY IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    Posted: 4/13/2009 8:22:02 PM EST
    E85 ethanol fuel is shown being pumped into a vehicle at a gas station selling alternative fuels in the town of Nevada, Iowa in this December 6, 2007 file photo. Proponents say corn ethanol for transportation fuel is far better for the environment, national security and the economy than oil and the first step toward cleaner fuel sources. To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/ REUTERS/Jason Reed/Files (UNITED STATES ENERGY BUSINESS)
  •  - To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    Posted: 4/13/2009 8:21:31 PM EST
    Thomas Wallace of the Enzyme Development Corporation conducts a test on a sample taken from a tank where corn is being converted into ethanol, inside the Lincolnway Energy plant in the town of Nevada, Iowa in this December 6, 2007 file photo. Proponents say corn ethanol for transportation fuel is far better for the environment, national security and the economy than oil and the first step toward cleaner fuel sources. To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/ REUTERS/Jason Reed/Files (UNITED STATES ENERGY BUSINESS)
  •  - To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    Posted: 4/13/2009 8:21:04 PM EST
    Corn planted after the middle of May struggles to grow in the summer heat at a farm in Dwight, Illinois in this June 19, 2007 file photo. Proponents say corn ethanol for transportation fuel is far better for the environment, national security and the economy than oil and the first step toward cleaner fuel sources. To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/ REUTERS/Mark Weinraub/Files (UNITED STATES ENERGY BUSINESS)
  •  - To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/

    Posted: 4/13/2009 8:20:37 PM EST
    A truck driver unloads his cargo of corn into a chute at the Lincolnway Energy plant in the town of Nevada, Iowa, in this December 6, 2007 file photo. Proponents say corn ethanol for transportation fuel is far better for the environment, national security and the economy than oil and the first step toward cleaner fuel sources. To match feature WATER-BIOFUELS/ REUTERS/Jason Reed/Files (UNITED STATES ENERGY BUSINESS)
  •  - A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario

    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario

    Posted: 11/5/2008 1:43:54 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files
  •  - Rivera explains EFuel's ethanol system Micro Fuel to California Governor Schwarzenegger in Los Angeles

    Rivera explains EFuel's ethanol system Micro Fuel to California Governor Schwarzenegger in Los Angeles

    Posted: 8/14/2008 6:49:05 PM EST
    Zac Rivera (L) explains EFuel company's home ethanol system Micro Fuel to California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger at the Green Tech Expo at the 26th Border Governors Conference at Universal Studios in Los Angeles August 14, 2008. The Micro Fuel system can produce up to 35 gallons of ethanol a week. REUTERS/Nick Ut/Pool (UNITED STATES)
  •  - Juan Godefoy, vice minister of Cuba's sugar ministry, addresses the media during a news conference in Havana

    Juan Godefoy, vice minister of Cuba's sugar ministry, addresses the media during a news conference in Havana

    Posted: 8/6/2008 3:01:52 PM EST
    Juan Godefoy, vice minister of Cuba's sugar ministry, addresses the media during a news conference in Havana August 6, 2008. Following denunciations of the use of food for fuel by former Cuban leader Fidel Castro, a Cuban official said on Wednesday the Caribbean island is modernizing its sugar industry but that plans to increase ethanol production have been scaled back. REUTERS/Claudia Daut (CUBA)
  •  - Galvez, director of Cuba's sugar ministry's Sugar Cane Derivatives Research Institute, addresses the media during a news conference in Havana

    Galvez, director of Cuba's sugar ministry's Sugar Cane Derivatives Research Institute, addresses the media during a news conference in Havana

    Posted: 8/6/2008 2:52:33 PM EST
    Luis Galvez (L), director of Cuba's sugar ministry's Sugar Cane Derivatives Research Institute, addresses the media during a news conference in Havana August 6, 2008. Following denunciations of the use of food for fuel by former Cuban leader Fidel Castro, Galvez said on Wednesday the Caribbean island is modernizing its sugar industry but that plans to increase ethanol production have been scaled back. REUTERS/Claudia Daut (CUBA)
  •  - Energy Secretary Reyes speaks during a launch of Petron ethanol fuel blend in Manila

    Energy Secretary Reyes speaks during a launch of Petron ethanol fuel blend in Manila

    Posted: 6/16/2008 7:19:53 AM EST
    Energy Secretary, Angelo Reyes, speaks during a launch of Petron ethanol fuel blend in Manila June 16, 2008. The Philippines on Monday rebuffed an offer to sell its 40 percent stake in local oil refiner Petron Corp. to investment fund Ashmore group for around $550 million, saying it wanted a higher price. REUTERS/John Javellana (PHILIPPINES)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:20:41 PM EST
    A vile of cellulosic material sits in a fridge inside a research facility for cellulosic ethanol at the University of Guelph in Guelph, in this May 7, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:18:20 PM EST
    A vile of cellulosic material is shown at a research facility for cellulosic ethanol at the University of Guelph in Guelph, in this May 7, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:10:59 PM EST
    A process operator is seen on top of fermenters at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:06:41 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:06:09 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:05:42 PM EST
    A process operator pours ethanol into a bottle at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 8:52:05 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail.But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 8:50:40 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail.But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE

    Posted: 6/1/2008 8:48:07 PM EST
    A process operator pours ethanol into a bottle at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail.But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)