Ethanol Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 5/23/2011 5:10:49 PM EST
    Former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty speaks during a town hall meeting Monday, May 23, 2011, at the State of Iowa Historical Building in Des Moines, Iowa. At his first campaign appearance since announcing his bid for the Republican nomination, Pawlenty cast himself as the Republican candidate willing to tell the country hard truths. He told corn-dependent Iowa that its prized federal subsidies for ethanol should be phased out. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:52:26 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:51:59 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:51:20 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:50:45 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:50:23 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:50:00 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:49:20 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee chabges letters and names on price board at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:48:43 AM EST
    A petrol station employee changes letters and names including the new ethanol E10 fuel on the price board at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employees fix signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employees fix signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:47:56 AM EST
    Petrol station employees fix signs including the new ethanol E10 fuel at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture was taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee fixes signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee fixes signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:47:05 AM EST
    A petrol station employee fixes a sign including the new ethanol E10 fuel at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee fixes signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee fixes signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:46:31 AM EST
    A petrol station employee fixes a sign including the new ethanol E10 fuel at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employee fixes signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employee fixes signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:35:44 AM EST
    A petrol station employee fixes a sign including the new ethanol E10 fuel at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - Petrol station employees fix signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Petrol station employees fix signs including new ethanol E10 fuel at highway service station in Soltau

    Posted: 3/2/2011 4:34:56 AM EST
    Petrol station employees fix signs including the new ethanol E10 fuel at a highway service station in Soltau between Hamburg and Hanover March 1, 2011. Starting this year, Germany introduced on its gas stations the so-called E10 fuel with 10 percent ethanol in a move to reduce vehicle exhaust emissions in line with European Commission directive regarding regulations on greenhouse emissions. Picture was taken March 1, 2011. REUTERS/Christian Charisius (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:18:20 PM EST
    A vile of cellulosic material is shown at a research facility for cellulosic ethanol at the University of Guelph in Guelph, in this May 7, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 10:06:41 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/

    Posted: 6/1/2008 8:50:40 PM EST
    A process operator shows a handful of corn at the GreenField Ethanol plant in Chatham, Ontario, in this April 10, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail.But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSIC/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
  •  - Slade Whetro loads a rail tank car with Ethanol at the Lincolnway Energy plant in Nevada, Iowa

    Slade Whetro loads a rail tank car with Ethanol at the Lincolnway Energy plant in Nevada, Iowa

    Posted: 12/6/2007 7:58:21 PM EST
    Load out technician Slade Whetro fills a railroad tank car with ethanol fuel, converted from corn, at the Lincolnway Energy plant in the town of Nevada, Iowa, December 6, 2007. The company, one of a growing number across Iowa and the United States, converts corn to ethanol fuel to be used in flexible-fuelled vehicles as an alternative energy source to oil. The business operates around the clock seven days a week, processing approximately 50,000 bushels (1.27 tonnes) of corn daily, and creating 150,000 gallons (567,752 litres) of ethanol per day. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
  •  - U.S. President Bush takes part in bilateral meeting with Brazilian President da Silva in Sao Paulo

    U.S. President Bush takes part in bilateral meeting with Brazilian President da Silva in Sao Paulo

    Posted: 3/9/2007 11:33:01 AM EST
    U.S. President George W. Bush (L) takes part in a bilateral meeting with Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva at a hotel in Sao Paulo March 9, 2007. Brazil and the United States, which together produce 70 percent of the world's ethanol, will sign a deal on Friday to share ethanol technology and help expand production in Central America and the Caribbean, the White House said. REUTERS/Jason Reed (BRAZIL)
  •  - File photo of the Sao Francisco sugar mill in Sertaozinho which contributes raw material for ethanol production

    File photo of the Sao Francisco sugar mill in Sertaozinho which contributes raw material for ethanol production

    Posted: 3/8/2007 9:47:41 AM EST
    A view of the Sao Francisco sugar mill in Sertaozinho which contributes raw material for ethanol production, about 344km (215 miles) southeast of Sao Paulo, Brazil, in this September 8, 2005 file photo. Brazil's sugar cane milling industry sees U.S. President George W. Bush's visit to Sao Paulo as a political move and not a sign of opening bilateral trade, as they criticize the U.S. import tariff on Brazilian ethanol. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker