EPA Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:51 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble pumps water from a truck into his neighbor's tank in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    A Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo shows a Cabot Oil & Gas wellhead in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble pumps drinking water into tanks along side his home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Kim Grosso is seen outside her home after her water was tested in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Stephen D. Brokenshire with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection waits to collect a water sample from a resident's home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Dan Jacobsen, center, and Joel Munson with TechLaw, contractors for the Environmental Protection Agency, conduct a field screening of a homeowners water in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Kim Grosso and Ken Morcom are seen during an interview with the Associated Press at home after their water was tested in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday Feb, 13, 2012 photo Stephen D. Brokenshire with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection takes a water sample from a resident's home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 8:30:45 AM EST
    In a Monday Feb. 13, 2012 photo a contractor for the Cabot Oil & Gas collects a water sample from a resident's home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 1/11/2012 1:10:47 PM EST
    President Barack Obama walks off of the stage after speaking at the EPA in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 1/10/2012 5:05:48 PM EST
    President Barack Obama and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson wave to the crowd before the president spoke during his visit to the EPA in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 1/10/2012 5:05:47 PM EST
    President Barack Obama talks with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson at the EPA in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
  •  - Cameras in audience follow U.S. President Barack Obama as he speaks to the employees of the EPA in Washington

    Cameras in audience follow U.S. President Barack Obama as he speaks to the employees of the EPA in Washington

    Posted: 1/10/2012 3:22:32 PM EST
    Cameras in the audience follow U.S. President Barack Obama as he speaks to employees of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington January 10, 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced by EPA Administrator Jackson before he speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington

    U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced by EPA Administrator Jackson before he speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington

    Posted: 1/10/2012 3:21:21 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson (R) before he speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington January 10, 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/9/2011 4:40:56 AM EST
    FILE - This May 22, 2009 picture shows John Fenton, a farmer who lives near Pavillion in central Wyoming, near a tank used in natural gas extraction, in background. Fenton and some of his neighbors blame hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a common technique used in drilling new oil and gas wells, for fouling their well water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday Dec. 8, 2011 in Wyoming, for the first time that fracking may be to blame for causing groundwater pollution. The EPA also emphasized that the findings are specific to the Pavillion area. The agency said the fracking that occurred in Pavillion differed from fracking methods used elsewhere in regions with different geological characteristics. (AP Photo/Bob Moen, File)
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    Posted: 12/8/2011 4:35:50 PM EST
    FILE - This May 22, 2009 picture shows John Fenton, a farmer who lives near Pavillion in central Wyoming, near a tank used in natural gas extraction, in background. Fenton and some of his neighbors blame hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a common technique used in drilling new oil and gas wells, for fouling their well water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday Dec. 8, 2011 in Wyoming, for the first time that fracking may be to blame for causing groundwater pollution. The EPA also emphasized that the findings are specific to the Pavillion area. The agency said the fracking that occurred in Pavillion differed from fracking methods used elsewhere in regions with different geological characteristics. (AP Photo/Bob Moen, File)
  •  - EPA Administrator Jackson testifies in Washington

    EPA Administrator Jackson testifies in Washington

    Posted: 9/15/2011 12:28:49 AM EST
    EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson testifies before the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling hearing on "the response to the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, environmental impacts, and approaches to restoration" in Washington September 27, 2010. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang
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    Posted: 7/30/2011 3:55:49 AM EST
    President Barack Obama greets Volvo Cars of North America President and CEO Doug Speck, center, at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, Friday, July 29, 2011, where he announced a new fuel efficiency standards for cars and light trucks. American Honda Executive Vice President John Mendel is at left, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, is second from right, and Ford President and CEO Alan Mulally is at right. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
  •  - Gogadze, a lawyer for arrested EPA photographer Kurtsikidze, speaks to the media outside the Interior Ministry office in Tbilisi

    Gogadze, a lawyer for arrested EPA photographer Kurtsikidze, speaks to the media outside the Interior Ministry office in Tbilisi

    Posted: 7/8/2011 9:37:17 PM EST
    Mikheil Gogadze (C), a lawyer for arrested European Pressphoto Agency (EPA) photographer Zurab Kurtsikidze, speaks to the media outside the Interior Ministry office in Tbilisi late July 8, 2011. Media watchdog Reporters Without Borders said on Friday it was disturbed by the arrest in Georgia of four photojournalists, including the president's personal photographer, on accusations of espionage. The four were arrested early on Thursday by counter-intelligence police targeting what the government describes as Russian spy networks operating in the former Soviet republic. REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili (GEORGIA - Tags: POLITICS MEDIA CRIME LAW)
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    Posted: 6/23/2011 7:26:13 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 29, 2010 file photo, Shawn Cole, 12, of Hinsdale, N.H., left, and Peter Rosploch, 11, of Winchester, N.H. fish in the Connecticut River across from the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. In 2010, the Vermont Senate was so troubled by tritium leaks as high as 2.5 million picocuries per liter at the Vermont Yankee reactor in southern Vermont (125 times the EPA drinking-water standard) that it voted to block relicensing _ a power that the Legislature holds in that state. But in March 2011, the NRC granted the plant a 20-year license extension, despite the state opposition. Afterwards, operator Entergy sued Vermont in federal court, challenging its authority to force the plant to close. (AP Photo/Jason R. Henske)