EPA Photos on Townhall

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              In this June, 27, 2012 photo, a portion of the livestock being raised by hog farmer Robert Young are electronically fed in the climate controlled hog barn on Young's family farm in Buck

    In this June, 27, 2012 photo, a portion of the livestock being raised by hog farmer Robert Young are electronically fed in the climate controlled hog barn on Young's family farm in Buck

    Posted: 8/2/2012 3:03:29 AM EST
    In this June, 27, 2012 photo, a portion of the livestock being raised by hog farmer Robert Young are electronically fed in the climate controlled hog barn on Young's family farm in Buckhart, Ill. Four years after the U.S. Government Accountability Office raised concerns and 40 years after the Clean Water Act gave the EPA the authority to protect the nation's waterways, the agency still doesn't know the location of many livestock farms, let alone how much manure they generate or how the waste is handled, because most of that information is kept by various state and or local agencies _ or not collected at all. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              In this June, 27, 2012 photo, a portion of the livestock being raised by hog farmer Robert Young are electronically fed in the climate controlled hog barn on Young's family farm in Buck

    In this June, 27, 2012 photo, a portion of the livestock being raised by hog farmer Robert Young are electronically fed in the climate controlled hog barn on Young's family farm in Buck

    Posted: 8/2/2012 3:03:29 AM EST
    In this June, 27, 2012 photo, a portion of the livestock being raised by hog farmer Robert Young are electronically fed in the climate controlled hog barn on Young's family farm in Buckhart, Ill. Four years after the U.S. Government Accountability Office raised concerns and 40 years after the Clean Water Act gave the EPA the authority to protect the nation's waterways, the agency still doesn't know the location of many livestock farms, let alone how much manure they generate or how the waste is handled, because most of that information is kept by various state and or local agencies _ or not collected at all. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              In this July, 28, 2012 photo, Karen Hudson, co-founder of Illinois Citizens for Clean Air and Water, poses with signs in Elmwood, Ill., opposing huge corporate-funded farms that are spr

    In this July, 28, 2012 photo, Karen Hudson, co-founder of Illinois Citizens for Clean Air and Water, poses with signs in Elmwood, Ill., opposing huge corporate-funded farms that are spr

    Posted: 8/2/2012 3:03:28 AM EST
    In this July, 28, 2012 photo, Karen Hudson, co-founder of Illinois Citizens for Clean Air and Water, poses with signs in Elmwood, Ill., opposing huge corporate-funded farms that are springing up across country. Hudson says many rural communities have been divided over this issue. She says as these livestock farms have grown to house thousands and even tens of thousands of animals — there are very real concerns about air and water pollution. She is calling for compromise and more regulation. Four years after the U.S. Government Accountability Office raised concerns and 40 years after the Clean Water Act gave the EPA the authority to protect the nation's waterways, the agency still doesn't know the location of many livestock farms, let alone how much manure they generate or how the waste is handled, because most of that information is kept by various state and or local agencies _ or not collected at all. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              In this July, 28, 2012 photo, Karen Hudson, co-founder of Illinois Citizens for Clean Air and Water, poses with signs in Elmwood, Ill., opposing huge corporate-funded farms that are spr

    In this July, 28, 2012 photo, Karen Hudson, co-founder of Illinois Citizens for Clean Air and Water, poses with signs in Elmwood, Ill., opposing huge corporate-funded farms that are spr

    Posted: 8/2/2012 3:03:28 AM EST
    In this July, 28, 2012 photo, Karen Hudson, co-founder of Illinois Citizens for Clean Air and Water, poses with signs in Elmwood, Ill., opposing huge corporate-funded farms that are springing up across country. Hudson says many rural communities have been divided over this issue. She says as these livestock farms have grown to house thousands and even tens of thousands of animals — there are very real concerns about air and water pollution. She is calling for compromise and more regulation. Four years after the U.S. Government Accountability Office raised concerns and 40 years after the Clean Water Act gave the EPA the authority to protect the nation's waterways, the agency still doesn't know the location of many livestock farms, let alone how much manure they generate or how the waste is handled, because most of that information is kept by various state and or local agencies _ or not collected at all. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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              FILE In this April 17, 2012 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson during an interview with The Associated Press at EPA Headquarters in Washington.

    FILE In this April 17, 2012 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson during an interview with The Associated Press at EPA Headquarters in Washington.

    Posted: 6/26/2012 2:43:23 PM EST
    FILE In this April 17, 2012 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson during an interview with The Associated Press at EPA Headquarters in Washington. A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the first-ever regulations aimed at reducing the gases blamed for global warming. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf, File)
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              FILE In this April 17, 2012 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson during an interview with The Associated Press at EPA Headquarters in Washington.

    FILE In this April 17, 2012 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson during an interview with The Associated Press at EPA Headquarters in Washington.

    Posted: 6/26/2012 2:43:23 PM EST
    FILE In this April 17, 2012 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson during an interview with The Associated Press at EPA Headquarters in Washington. A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the first-ever regulations aimed at reducing the gases blamed for global warming. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf, File)
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    Posted: 6/15/2012 3:00:56 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 15, 2011, file photo Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson testifies before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works regarding the Clean Air Act and Public Health on Capitol Hill in Washington. In response to a federal court order requiring the Obama administration to update air quality standards under the Clean Air Act the EPA is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. The long-delayed rule is to be made public on Friday, June 15, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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    Posted: 6/15/2012 3:00:56 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 15, 2011, file photo Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson testifies before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works regarding the Clean Air Act and Public Health on Capitol Hill in Washington. In response to a federal court order requiring the Obama administration to update air quality standards under the Clean Air Act the EPA is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. The long-delayed rule is to be made public on Friday, June 15, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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    Posted: 6/15/2012 3:00:56 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2010 file photo, trucks travel eastbound in Livermore, Calif. Risking an election-year backlash from Republicans, the Obama administration is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. Risking an election-year backlash from Republicans, the Obama administration is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. The move by the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday, June 15, 2012 won immediate support from environmental groups and public health advocates, who said the EPA was protecting millions of Americans at risk of asthma attacks, lung cancer, heart disease and premature death. But congressional Republicans and industry officials called the rules overly strict and said they could hurt economic growth and cause job losses in areas where pollution levels are determined to be too high. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
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    Posted: 6/15/2012 3:00:56 PM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2010 file photo, trucks travel eastbound in Livermore, Calif. Risking an election-year backlash from Republicans, the Obama administration is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. Risking an election-year backlash from Republicans, the Obama administration is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. The move by the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday, June 15, 2012 won immediate support from environmental groups and public health advocates, who said the EPA was protecting millions of Americans at risk of asthma attacks, lung cancer, heart disease and premature death. But congressional Republicans and industry officials called the rules overly strict and said they could hurt economic growth and cause job losses in areas where pollution levels are determined to be too high. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
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    Posted: 6/15/2012 3:00:56 PM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 file photo, exhaust rises from smokestacks in front of piles of coal at NRG Energy's W.A. Parish Electric Generating Station in Thompsons, Texas. Risking an election-year backlash from Republicans, the Obama administration is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. The move by the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday, June 15, 2012 won immediate support from environmental groups and public health advocates, who said the EPA was protecting millions of Americans at risk of asthma attacks, lung cancer, heart disease and premature death. But congressional Republicans and industry officials called the rules overly strict and said they could hurt economic growth and cause job losses in areas where pollution levels are determined to be too high. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
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    Posted: 6/15/2012 3:00:56 PM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, March 16, 2011 file photo, exhaust rises from smokestacks in front of piles of coal at NRG Energy's W.A. Parish Electric Generating Station in Thompsons, Texas. Risking an election-year backlash from Republicans, the Obama administration is proposing new air quality standards to lower the amount of soot that can be released into the air. The move by the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday, June 15, 2012 won immediate support from environmental groups and public health advocates, who said the EPA was protecting millions of Americans at risk of asthma attacks, lung cancer, heart disease and premature death. But congressional Republicans and industry officials called the rules overly strict and said they could hurt economic growth and cause job losses in areas where pollution levels are determined to be too high. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
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    Posted: 5/31/2012 8:20:48 AM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the EPA shows Al Armendariz. Armendariz. In three years since President Barack Obama took office, Republicans have made the Environmental Protection Agency a lightning rod for complaints that the administration has declared war on oil and gas producers. (AP Photo/EPA)
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    Posted: 5/31/2012 8:20:48 AM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the EPA shows Al Armendariz. Armendariz. In three years since President Barack Obama took office, Republicans have made the Environmental Protection Agency a lightning rod for complaints that the administration has declared war on oil and gas producers. (AP Photo/EPA)
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    Posted: 4/30/2012 6:10:46 PM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the EPA shows Al Armendariz. Armendariz, the Obama administration's top environmental official in the oil-rich South and Southwest region has resigned after Republicans targeted him over remarks made two years ago when he used the word "crucify" to describe how he would go after companies violating environmental laws. (AP Photo/EPA)
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    Posted: 3/21/2012 5:30:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2011 file photo, Mike and Chantell Sackett of Priest Lake, Idaho, pose for a photo in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that property owners have a right to prompt review by a judge of an important tool used by the Environmental Protection Agency to address water pollution. The court sided with an Idaho couple who object to an EPA order that blocked construction of their new home near a scenic lake and threatened fines of more than $30,000 a day. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:51 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble pumps water from a truck into his neighbor's tank in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble stands in view of a natural gas wellhead across that street of his home, that he believes contaminated his well in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    A Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo shows a Cabot Oil & Gas wellhead in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble pumps drinking water into tanks along side his home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)