Envy Photos on Townhall

  •  - 
              In this Sunday, April 7, 2013, photo, a Verizon Studio booth is seen at MetLife Stadium, in East Rutherford, N.J.  Verizon Communications Inc. on Thursday, April 18, 2013 said that its

    In this Sunday, April 7, 2013, photo, a Verizon Studio booth is seen at MetLife Stadium, in East Rutherford, N.J. Verizon Communications Inc. on Thursday, April 18, 2013 said that its

    Posted: 4/18/2013 9:13:59 AM EST
    In this Sunday, April 7, 2013, photo, a Verizon Studio booth is seen at MetLife Stadium, in East Rutherford, N.J. Verizon Communications Inc. on Thursday, April 18, 2013 said that its profit rose 16 percent in the latest quarter as wireless revenue kept rising at a rate that's the envy of the industry.The New York-based phone company reported net income of $1.95 billion, or 68 cents per share, in the January to March period. That was up from $1.69 billion, or 59 cents per share, a year earlier. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  •  - 
              A view of a square in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style livin

    A view of a square in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style livin

    Posted: 10/15/2012 3:53:36 AM EST
    A view of a square in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living standards, Slovenia is becoming a showcase of failed transition, government mismanagement and bad loans. Andrej Plut has always thought he was fortunate to live in Slovenia, at one time the most prosperous of the former republics of Yugoslavia and a star among the eastern European states that joined the EU after the fall of communism. The 55-year-old dentist can't figure out what went wrong with his tiny Alpine state, which now faces one of the worst recessions and financial system collapses among the crisis-stricken 17-country group that uses the euro. "We used to live so well," Plut said. "Now, we don't know what tomorrow brings." (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
  •  - 
              Cranes are seen in the port of Koper, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living st

    Cranes are seen in the port of Koper, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living st

    Posted: 10/15/2012 3:53:36 AM EST
    Cranes are seen in the port of Koper, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living standards, Slovenia is becoming a showcase of failed transition, government mismanagement and bad loans. Andrej Plut has always thought he was fortunate to live in Slovenia, at one time the most prosperous of the former republics of Yugoslavia and a star among the eastern European states that joined the EU after the fall of communism. The 55-year-old dentist can't figure out what went wrong with his tiny Alpine state, which now faces one of the worst recessions and financial system collapses among the crisis-stricken 17-country group that uses the euro. "We used to live so well," Plut said. "Now, we don't know what tomorrow brings." (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
  •  - 
              A man looks from a terrace while standing next to a crucifix, in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of

    A man looks from a terrace while standing next to a crucifix, in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of

    Posted: 10/15/2012 3:53:36 AM EST
    A man looks from a terrace while standing next to a crucifix, in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living standards, Slovenia is becoming a showcase of failed transition, government mismanagement and bad loans. Andrej Plut has always thought he was fortunate to live in Slovenia, at one time the most prosperous of the former republics of Yugoslavia and a star among the eastern European states that joined the EU after the fall of communism. The 55-year-old dentist can't figure out what went wrong with his tiny Alpine state, which now faces one of the worst recessions and financial system collapses among the crisis-stricken 17-country group that uses the euro. "We used to live so well," Plut said. "Now, we don't know what tomorrow brings." (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
  •  - 
              Cyclists cross a bridge in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style

    Cyclists cross a bridge in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style

    Posted: 10/15/2012 3:53:36 AM EST
    Cyclists cross a bridge in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living standards, Slovenia is becoming a showcase of failed transition, government mismanagement and bad loans. Andrej Plut has always thought he was fortunate to live in Slovenia, at one time the most prosperous of the former republics of Yugoslavia and a star among the eastern European states that joined the EU after the fall of communism. The 55-year-old dentist can't figure out what went wrong with his tiny Alpine state, which now faces one of the worst recessions and financial system collapses among the crisis-stricken 17-country group that uses the euro. "We used to live so well," Plut said. "Now, we don't know what tomorrow brings." (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
  •  - 
              A view of a square in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style livin

    A view of a square in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style livin

    Posted: 10/15/2012 3:53:36 AM EST
    A view of a square in downtown Ljubljana, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living standards, Slovenia is becoming a showcase of failed transition, government mismanagement and bad loans. Andrej Plut has always thought he was fortunate to live in Slovenia, at one time the most prosperous of the former republics of Yugoslavia and a star among the eastern European states that joined the EU after the fall of communism. The 55-year-old dentist can't figure out what went wrong with his tiny Alpine state, which now faces one of the worst recessions and financial system collapses among the crisis-stricken 17-country group that uses the euro. "We used to live so well," Plut said. "Now, we don't know what tomorrow brings." (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
  •  - 
              Cranes and a cargo ship are seen in the port of Koper, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Wester

    Cranes and a cargo ship are seen in the port of Koper, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Wester

    Posted: 10/15/2012 3:53:36 AM EST
    Cranes and a cargo ship are seen in the port of Koper, Slovenia, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Once the envy of the former European communist states because of its booming economy and Western-style living standards, Slovenia is becoming a showcase of failed transition, government mismanagement and bad loans. Andrej Plut has always thought he was fortunate to live in Slovenia, at one time the most prosperous of the former republics of Yugoslavia and a star among the eastern European states that joined the EU after the fall of communism. The 55-year-old dentist can't figure out what went wrong with his tiny Alpine state, which now faces one of the worst recessions and financial system collapses among the crisis-stricken 17-country group that uses the euro. "We used to live so well," Plut said. "Now, we don't know what tomorrow brings." (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
  •  - 
              In this Friday, Sept. 14, 2012 photo, people stream into a street near Gangnam Station in Seoul, South Korea. About 1 percent of Seoul's population lives in the district of Gangnam, but

    In this Friday, Sept. 14, 2012 photo, people stream into a street near Gangnam Station in Seoul, South Korea. About 1 percent of Seoul's population lives in the district of Gangnam, but

    Posted: 9/19/2012 3:58:31 AM EST
    In this Friday, Sept. 14, 2012 photo, people stream into a street near Gangnam Station in Seoul, South Korea. About 1 percent of Seoul's population lives in the district of Gangnam, but many of its residents are very rich. Today, South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style" video has more than 200 million YouTube views and counting, and it's easy to see why. Gangnam is only a small slice of Seoul, but it inspires a complicated mixture of desire, envy and bitterness. It's also the spark for PSY's catchy, world-conquering song. (AP Photo/Hye Soo Nah)
  •  - 
              This photo taken in 1980s shows the scenery of Gangnam area in Seoul, South Korea. Gangnam is the most coveted address in Korea now, but less than two generations ago it was little more

    This photo taken in 1980s shows the scenery of Gangnam area in Seoul, South Korea. Gangnam is the most coveted address in Korea now, but less than two generations ago it was little more

    Posted: 9/19/2012 3:58:31 AM EST
    This photo taken in 1980s shows the scenery of Gangnam area in Seoul, South Korea. Gangnam is the most coveted address in Korea now, but less than two generations ago it was little more than some forlorn homes surrounded by flat farmland and drainage ditches. Now about 1 percent of Seoul's population lives there, but many of its residents are very rich. South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style" video has more than 200 million YouTube views and counting, and it's easy to see why. Gangnam is only a small slice of Seoul, but it inspires a complicated mixture of desire, envy and bitterness. It's also the spark for PSY's catchy, world-conquering song. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Lee Sung-kyu) KOREA OUT
  •  - 
              In this photo taken on Sept. 14, 2012, South Korean rapper PSY performs his massive K-pop hit "Gangnam Style" live on NBC's "Today" show in New York. The "Gangnam Style" video has more

    In this photo taken on Sept. 14, 2012, South Korean rapper PSY performs his massive K-pop hit "Gangnam Style" live on NBC's "Today" show in New York. The "Gangnam Style" video has more

    Posted: 9/19/2012 3:58:31 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Sept. 14, 2012, South Korean rapper PSY performs his massive K-pop hit "Gangnam Style" live on NBC's "Today" show in New York. The "Gangnam Style" video has more than 200 million YouTube views and counting, and it's easy to see why. Gangnam is only a small slice of Seoul, but it inspires a complicated mixture of desire, envy and bitterness. It's also the spark for PSY's catchy, world-conquering song. (AP Photo/Invision via AP Images, Jason DeCrow)
  •  - 
              In this photo taken on Sept. 14, 2012, South Korean rapper PSY performs his massive K-pop hit "Gangnam Style" live on NBC's "Today" show in New York. His "Gangnam Style" video has more

    In this photo taken on Sept. 14, 2012, South Korean rapper PSY performs his massive K-pop hit "Gangnam Style" live on NBC's "Today" show in New York. His "Gangnam Style" video has more

    Posted: 9/19/2012 3:58:30 AM EST
    In this photo taken on Sept. 14, 2012, South Korean rapper PSY performs his massive K-pop hit "Gangnam Style" live on NBC's "Today" show in New York. His "Gangnam Style" video has more than 200 million YouTube views and counting, and it's easy to see why. Gangnam is only a small slice of Seoul, but it inspires a complicated mixture of desire, envy and bitterness. It's also the spark for PSY's catchy, world-conquering song. (AP Photo/Invision via AP Images, Jason DeCrow)
  •  - 
              This Aug. 22, 2012 photo shows South Korean rapper PSY posing for a photo in New York. His "Gangnam Style" video has more than 200 million YouTube views and counting, and it's easy to s

    This Aug. 22, 2012 photo shows South Korean rapper PSY posing for a photo in New York. His "Gangnam Style" video has more than 200 million YouTube views and counting, and it's easy to s

    Posted: 9/19/2012 2:43:17 AM EST
    This Aug. 22, 2012 photo shows South Korean rapper PSY posing for a photo in New York. His "Gangnam Style" video has more than 200 million YouTube views and counting, and it's easy to see why. Gangnam is only a small slice of Seoul, but it inspires a complicated mixture of desire, envy and bitterness. It's also the spark for PSY's catchy, world-conquering song. (AP Photo/John Carucci)
  •  - A worker carries boxes at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    A worker carries boxes at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    Posted: 9/12/2012 10:22:35 AM EST
    A worker carries boxes at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus September 2, 2012. Once the mainstay of the local economy, Palestinian agriculture in the rocky West Bank is in decline, with farmers struggling to protect both their livelihoods and their lands. Deprived of water and cut off from key markets, farmers across the occupied territory can only look on with a mix of anger and envy as Israeli settlers copiously irrigate their own plantations and export at will. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
  •  - A worker pulls a cart loaded with cucumbers at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    A worker pulls a cart loaded with cucumbers at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    Posted: 9/12/2012 10:22:35 AM EST
    A worker pulls a cart loaded with cucumbers at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus September 2, 2012. Once the mainstay of the local economy, Palestinian agriculture in the rocky West Bank is in decline, with farmers struggling to protect both their livelihoods and their lands. Deprived of water and cut off from key markets, farmers across the occupied territory can only look on with a mix of anger and envy as Israeli settlers copiously irrigate their own plantations and export at will. Picture taken September 2, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
  •  - A worker operates a forklift at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    A worker operates a forklift at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    Posted: 9/12/2012 10:22:35 AM EST
    A worker operates a forklift at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus September 2, 2012. Once the mainstay of the local economy, Palestinian agriculture in the rocky West Bank is in decline, with farmers struggling to protect both their livelihoods and their lands. Deprived of water and cut off from key markets, farmers across the occupied territory can only look on with a mix of anger and envy as Israeli settlers copiously irrigate their own plantations and export at will. Picture taken September 2, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
  •  - A worker arranges boxes of tomatoes at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    A worker arranges boxes of tomatoes at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus

    Posted: 9/12/2012 10:22:35 AM EST
    A worker arranges boxes of tomatoes at a wholesale vegetable and fruit market in the West Bank village of Beita, near Nablus September 2, 2012. Once the mainstay of the local economy, Palestinian agriculture in the rocky West Bank is in decline, with farmers struggling to protect both their livelihoods and their lands. Deprived of water and cut off from key markets, farmers across the occupied territory can only look on with a mix of anger and envy as Israeli settlers copiously irrigate their own plantations and export at will. Picture taken September 2, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
  •  - 
              In this photo taken Aug. 21, 2012, Mike O'Malley, 55, left, and Sharon O'Malley, 53, pose for a photo in Chicago. Mitt Romney's Medicare plan would have very different effects on couple

    In this photo taken Aug. 21, 2012, Mike O'Malley, 55, left, and Sharon O'Malley, 53, pose for a photo in Chicago. Mitt Romney's Medicare plan would have very different effects on couple

    Posted: 8/23/2012 1:28:55 PM EST
    In this photo taken Aug. 21, 2012, Mike O'Malley, 55, left, and Sharon O'Malley, 53, pose for a photo in Chicago. Mitt Romney's Medicare plan would have very different effects on couples and siblings just a few years apart in age. It's leading to comparisons _ and sometimes perhaps a touch of envy The GOP presidential candidate wants to revamp Medicare for future retirees _ anyone now 54 and younger. Starting in 2023, they'd get a fixed amount of money from the government to pick private health insurance or a government plan like Medicare. (AP Photo/Sitthixay Ditthavong)
  •  - 
              In this photo taken Aug. 21, 2012, Mike O'Malley, 55, left, and Sharon O'Malley, 53, pose for a photo in Chicago. Mitt Romney's Medicare plan would have very different effects on couple

    In this photo taken Aug. 21, 2012, Mike O'Malley, 55, left, and Sharon O'Malley, 53, pose for a photo in Chicago. Mitt Romney's Medicare plan would have very different effects on couple

    Posted: 8/23/2012 1:23:30 PM EST
    In this photo taken Aug. 21, 2012, Mike O'Malley, 55, left, and Sharon O'Malley, 53, pose for a photo in Chicago. Mitt Romney's Medicare plan would have very different effects on couples and siblings just a few years apart in age. It's leading to comparisons _ and sometimes perhaps a touch of envy The GOP presidential candidate wants to revamp Medicare for future retirees _ anyone now 54 and younger. Starting in 2023, they'd get a fixed amount of money from the government to pick private health insurance or a government plan like Medicare. (AP Photo/Sitthixay Ditthavong)
  •  -

    Posted: 1/13/2012 5:30:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2012 file photo, Hewlet Packard displays the Envy 14 Spectre ultrabook in Las Vegas. The International Consumer Electronics show gathered more than 140,000 people in Las Vegas this week. These are some of the more significant gadgets that were announced at the show. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey, File)
  •  - A HP Envy 14 Spectre ultrabook is displayed at the Intel booth during the 2012 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas

    A HP Envy 14 Spectre ultrabook is displayed at the Intel booth during the 2012 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas

    Posted: 1/12/2012 5:05:49 PM EST
    A HP Envy 14 Spectre ultrabook is displayed at the Intel booth during the 2012 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 12, 2012. CES, the world's largest consumer technology tradeshow, runs through January 13. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)