Environmental Protection Agency Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Dan Jacobsen, center, and Joel Munson with TechLaw, contractors for the Environmental Protection Agency, conduct a field screening of a homeowners water in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Kim Grosso and Ken Morcom are seen during an interview with the Associated Press at home after their water was tested in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble gestures during an interview with the Associated Press in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday Feb, 13, 2012 photo Stephen D. Brokenshire with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection takes a water sample from a resident's home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:49 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble smokes a cigar next to a truck he uses to haul water to his neighbors and himself in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale, a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 8:30:46 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble smokes a cigar next to a truck he uses to haul water to his neighbors and himself in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 8:30:45 AM EST
    In a Monday Feb. 13, 2012 photo a contractor for the Cabot Oil & Gas collects a water sample from a resident's home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 2/8/2012 2:05:48 PM EST
    In this image released by Universal Pictures, the character known as The Lorax, voiced by Danny DeVito, is shown in a scene from the animated film, "Dr. Seuss' The Lorax." Universal Pictures' ?Dr. Seuss' The Lorax? is going green, and not only with green eggs and ham. The studio has lined up an impressive list of eco-friendly launch partners that includes for the first time the U.S. government's Environmental Protection Agency and Whole Foods Market. These partners and others are getting behind an animated movie, set for release March 2 in North America, about a creature who ?speaks for the trees? and fights rampant industrialism in a retelling of a Dr. Seuss children's book first published in 1971. (AP Photo/Universal Pictures)
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    Posted: 1/13/2012 4:55:47 PM EST
    Dimock resident Julie Sautner, right, protests in front of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia before an appearance by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson Friday Jan. 13, 2012. Residents of the small northeastern Pennsylvania town of Dimock, at the center of the political fight over natural gas drilling, joined environmental activists from elsewhere to rally Friday outside a conference on urban environmental issues. About a dozen residents of Dimock have sued Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., claiming the energy company caused contamination of wells when it extracted natural gas using a process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)
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    Posted: 1/13/2012 4:55:47 PM EST
    Dimock resident Victoria Switzer holds a map of the Dimock area as she addresses fellow protestors front of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia before an appearance by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson Friday Jan. 13, 2012. Residents of the small northeastern Pennsylvania town of Dimock, at the center of the political fight over natural gas drilling, joined environmental activists from elsewhere to rally Friday outside a conference on urban environmental issues. About a dozen residents of Dimock have sued Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., claiming the energy company caused contamination of wells when it extracted natural gas using a process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)
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    Posted: 1/13/2012 4:55:47 PM EST
    Protesters stand in front of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia before an appearance by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson Friday Jan. 13, 2012. Residents of the small northeastern Pennsylvania town of Dimock, at the center of the political fight over natural gas drilling, joined environmental activists from elsewhere to rally Friday outside a conference on urban environmental issues. About a dozen residents of Dimock have sued Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., claiming the energy company caused contamination of wells when it extracted natural gas using a process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)
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    Posted: 1/10/2012 5:05:48 PM EST
    President Barack Obama and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson wave to the crowd before the president spoke during his visit to the EPA in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 1/10/2012 5:05:47 PM EST
    President Barack Obama greets the crowd during a visit to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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    Posted: 1/10/2012 5:05:47 PM EST
    President Barack Obama talks with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson at the EPA in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
  •  - Cameras in audience follow U.S. President Barack Obama as he speaks to the employees of the EPA in Washington

    Cameras in audience follow U.S. President Barack Obama as he speaks to the employees of the EPA in Washington

    Posted: 1/10/2012 3:22:32 PM EST
    Cameras in the audience follow U.S. President Barack Obama as he speaks to employees of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington January 10, 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced by EPA Administrator Jackson before he speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington

    U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced by EPA Administrator Jackson before he speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington

    Posted: 1/10/2012 3:21:21 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama is introduced by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson (R) before he speaks to employees of the EPA in Washington January 10, 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/22/2011 12:05:45 AM EST
    FILE - This July 27, 2010 file photo shows one of the stacks at the Four Corners Power Plant, operated by Arizona Public Service on tribal land near Fruitland, N.M. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is slated to release rules aimed at reducing mercury pollution from large coal-fired power plants. The new standards factored into a plan by APS to shutter three generators at Four Corners. (AP Photo/Paul Foy, file)
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    Posted: 12/9/2011 4:40:56 AM EST
    FILE - This May 22, 2009 picture shows John Fenton, a farmer who lives near Pavillion in central Wyoming, near a tank used in natural gas extraction, in background. Fenton and some of his neighbors blame hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a common technique used in drilling new oil and gas wells, for fouling their well water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday Dec. 8, 2011 in Wyoming, for the first time that fracking may be to blame for causing groundwater pollution. The EPA also emphasized that the findings are specific to the Pavillion area. The agency said the fracking that occurred in Pavillion differed from fracking methods used elsewhere in regions with different geological characteristics. (AP Photo/Bob Moen, File)
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    Posted: 12/9/2011 4:40:55 AM EST
    FILE- In this photograph taken April 15, 2009, an unidentified worker steps through the maze of hoses being used at a remote fracking site being run by Halliburton for natural-gas producer Williams in Rulison, Colo. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday Dec. 8, 2011 in Wyoming, for the first time that fracking - a controversial method of improving the productivity of oil and gas wells - may be to blame for causing groundwater pollution. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
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    Posted: 12/8/2011 4:35:50 PM EST
    FILE - This May 22, 2009 picture shows John Fenton, a farmer who lives near Pavillion in central Wyoming, near a tank used in natural gas extraction, in background. Fenton and some of his neighbors blame hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a common technique used in drilling new oil and gas wells, for fouling their well water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday Dec. 8, 2011 in Wyoming, for the first time that fracking may be to blame for causing groundwater pollution. The EPA also emphasized that the findings are specific to the Pavillion area. The agency said the fracking that occurred in Pavillion differed from fracking methods used elsewhere in regions with different geological characteristics. (AP Photo/Bob Moen, File)