Environmental Protection Agency Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:53 PM EST
    This undated photo provided by the subject shows "Documerica" photographer Lyntha Scott Eiler. About forty years ago the newly established Environmental Protection Agency sent an army of nearly 100 photographers across the country for the "Documerica" program to capture images of environmental concern at the dawn of environmental regulation. Eiler photographed work and homes on Navajo and Hopi reservations in Arizona. (AP Photo)
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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:52 PM EST
    This May 1973 photo released by the U.S. National Archives shows neighborhood youngsters in the playground adjacent to Logan Airport at the end of Neptune Road in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston. The photo was taken for the "Documerica" program, 1972-1977, instituted by the then new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. The neighborhood was being threatened by encroaching construction for Logan Airport and related services. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives, Michael Phillip Manheim)
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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:52 PM EST
    This photo taken in July 1972 shows part of the Olin Mathieson Plant on the far side of Side of Lake Charles, La. The photo was taken for the "Documerica" program, 1972-1977, instituted by the then new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives, Marc St. Gil)
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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:52 PM EST
    This June 1972 photo released by the U.S. National Archives shows a sunrise over the Olin-Mathieson Plant on the Calcasieu River in Calcasieu Parish, La. The photo was taken for the "Documerica" program, 1972-1977, instituted by the then new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives, Marc St. Gil)
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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:52 PM EST
    This photo taken April 14, 2012, shows a Blue Line subway train passing Neptune Road in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston. The same view was photographed for the "Documerica" program, 1972-1977, instituted by the then new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. The residential neighborhood that was once there is gone. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:51 PM EST
    This photo taken Saturday, April 14, 2012, shows a view of Lowell Street in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston near Logan Airport. The same view was photographed for the "Documerica" program, 1972-1977, instituted by the then new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. The residential neighborhood that was once there is gone. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:50 PM EST
    This photo taken April 10, 2012, shows urban development in lower Mahanattan with the World Trade Center, right, in New York. It was photographed near the location of an historic 1973 photo, taken for the "Documerica" program, begun in 1972 by the new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
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    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:50 PM EST
    This photo taken on April 12, 2012, shows a view down Clark Avenue from West 13th Street in Cleveland, Ohio. The same view was photographed in 1973 for the "Documerica" program, 1972-1977, instituted by the then new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
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    Posted: 4/18/2012 4:35:48 PM EST
    FILE - This file handout photo provided by the Tennessee Valley Authority shows the massive ash spill at the Kingston Fossil Plant in Kingston, Tenn., on Dec. 23, 2008, the day following the spill. The spill is considered one of the nation's worst environmental disasters and the incident drew national attention to coal ash and its ominous-sounding ingredients. But two years after the agency proposed regulating coal ash as hazardous and placing restrictions on its disposal, the the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued no ruling. (AP Photo/TVA, File)
  •  - The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    Posted: 3/28/2012 3:29:08 AM EST
    The American Electric Power Company's cooling tower at their coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in this file photo taken October 27, 2009 in New Haven, West Virginia. The Obama administration proposed March 27, 2012 the first ever standards to cut carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants, a move likely to be hotly contested by Republicans and industry in an election year. The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the long-delayed rules that limit emissions from all new U.S. power stations, which would effectively bar the building of any new coal plants. REUTERS/Ayesha Rascoe/Files
  •  - The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    Posted: 3/28/2012 3:28:48 AM EST
    The American Electric Power Company's cooling tower at their coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in this file photo taken October 27, 2009 in New Haven, West Virginia. The Obama administration proposed March 27, 2012 the first ever standards to cut carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants, a move likely to be hotly contested by Republicans and industry in an election year. The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the long-delayed rules that limit emissions from all new U.S. power stations, which would effectively bar the building of any new coal plants. REUTERS/Ayesha Rascoe/Files
  •  - The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    The American Electric Power Company's coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in New Haven, West Virginia

    Posted: 3/27/2012 3:43:11 PM EST
    The American Electric Power Company's cooling tower at their coal-burning Mountaineer plant is shown in this file photo taken October 27, 2009 in New Haven, West Virginia. The Obama administration proposed March 27, 2012 the first ever standards to cut carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants, a move likely to be hotly contested by Republicans and industry in an election year. The Environmental Protection Agency proposed the long-delayed rules that limit emissions from all new U.S. power stations, which would effectively bar the building of any new coal plants. REUTERS/Ayesha Rascoe/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENERGY POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 3/21/2012 5:30:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2011 file photo, Mike and Chantell Sackett of Priest Lake, Idaho, pose for a photo in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that property owners have a right to prompt review by a judge of an important tool used by the Environmental Protection Agency to address water pollution. The court sided with an Idaho couple who object to an EPA order that blocked construction of their new home near a scenic lake and threatened fines of more than $30,000 a day. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)
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    Posted: 3/7/2012 8:40:47 PM EST
    In this Feb. 16, 2012 photo, Sally Cole, co-owner of Cole?s Antiques Villa in Ludington, Mich., displays some of the shop?s memorabilia from the S.S. Badger, including a placemat, a coffee mug and playing cards. The S.S. Badger is the nation's last steamship powered by coal. Federal regulators want the ferry to stop dumping waste ash into the lake during its May-to-October trips between its home port of Ludington, Mich., and Manitowoc, Wis. Operators plan a switch to natural gas but are asking the Environmental Protection Agency for more time. If the standoff isn't resolved this year, the Badger may be grounded. (AP Photo/John Flesher)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:51 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble pumps water from a truck into his neighbor's tank in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble stands in view of a natural gas wellhead across that street of his home, that he believes contaminated his well in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble pumps drinking water into tanks along side his home in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:50 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble gestures during an interview with the Associated Press in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 11:15:49 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble smokes a cigar next to a truck he uses to haul water to his neighbors and himself in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale, a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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    Posted: 3/5/2012 8:30:46 AM EST
    In a Monday, Feb. 13, 2012 photo, Ray Kemble smokes a cigar next to a truck he uses to haul water to his neighbors and himself in Dimock, Pa. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency appears to be ramping up its interest in the Marcellus Shale a rock formation in Pennsylvania and surrounding states that is believed to hold the nation?s largest reservoir of gas with investigations in both the northeastern and southwestern corners of Pennsylvania. The drilling industry accuses EPA of overreach. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)


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