Environmental Protection Agency Photos on Townhall

  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA confiscate trucks found to be transporting illegal charcoal in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA confiscate trucks found to be transporting illegal charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 1:55:55 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA confiscate trucks found to be transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - A view of a truck confiscated by Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA after it was found to be transporting charcoal is seen in Goianesia

    A view of a truck confiscated by Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA after it was found to be transporting charcoal is seen in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 1:15:52 PM EST
    A view of a truck confiscated by Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA after it was found to be transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest is seen along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:52:31 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - A view of a truck confiscated by Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA after it was found to be transporting illegal charcoal is seen in Goianesia

    A view of a truck confiscated by Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA after it was found to be transporting illegal charcoal is seen in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:26:28 PM EST
    A view of a truck confiscated by Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA after it was found to be transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest is seen along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES TRANSPORT)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:16:21 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:14:32 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - An agent from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroys clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    An agent from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroys clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:12:33 PM EST
    An agent from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroys clandestine ovens used to make charcoal from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:10:54 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroy clandestine ovens used to make charcoal from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - An agent from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroys clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    An agent from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroys clandestine ovens used to make charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:08:40 PM EST
    An agent from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA destroys clandestine ovens used to make charcoal from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS CRIME LAW BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA confiscate trucks found to be transporting illegal charcoal in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA confiscate trucks found to be transporting illegal charcoal in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:06:38 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA confiscate trucks found to be transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA man an inspection point in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA man an inspection point in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:03:38 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA man an inspection point to stop trucks transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA man an inspection point in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA man an inspection point in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 12:01:47 PM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA man an inspection point to stop trucks transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency confiscate two trucks found to be transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest in Goianesia

    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency confiscate two trucks found to be transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest in Goianesia

    Posted: 5/28/2012 11:39:35 AM EST
    Agents from Brazil's environmental protection agency IBAMA confiscate two trucks found to be transporting charcoal made from wood cut illegally from the Amazon rainforest, along the PA 150 highway in Goianesia, Para State May 26, 2012. The PA 150 is the main route used for the transportation of illegal charcoal to smelters producing pig iron, one of the main components of steel, in the city of Maraba, according to IBAMA. A recent Greenpeace investigation reported that the demand for pig iron for industries, such as the U.S. auto industry, is a major contributor to the destruction of the Amazon forest. Picture taken May 26, 2012. REUTER/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
  •  - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson testifies at a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations in Washington

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson testifies at a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations in Washington

    Posted: 5/3/2012 7:03:49 PM EST
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson testifies at a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 22, 2011. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
  •  -
    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:53 PM EST
    This undated photo provided by the Corn family shows "Documerica" photographer Jack Corn. About forty years ago Corn was one of an army of nearly 100 photographers sent by the newly established Environmental Protection Agency across the country for the "Documerica" program to capture images of environmental concern at the dawn of environmental regulation. Corn focused his lens on the harsh plight of the American coal miner. (AP Photo/Nathaniel Corn)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:53 PM EST
    This 1970's photo provided by the Corn family shows "Documerica" photographer Jack Corn. About forty years ago the newly established Environmental Protection Agency sent an army of nearly 100 photographers across the country for the "Documerica" program to capture images of environmental concern at the dawn of environmental regulation. Corn focused his lens on the plight of the American coal miner. (AP Photo/Corn Family)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:53 PM EST
    This photo taken April 12, 2012, shows "Documerica" photographer Jim Pickerell, 75, of Bethesda, Md., at his studio in Rockville, Md. About forty years ago the newly established Environmental Protection Agency sent an army of nearly 100 photographers across the country for the "Documerica" program to capture images of environmental concern at the dawn of environmental regulation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:52 PM EST
    This November 1973 photo provided by the Pickerell family shows "Documerica" photographer Jim Pickerell. About forty years ago the newly established Environmental Protection Agency sent an army of nearly 100 photographers across the country for the "Documerica" program to capture images of environmental concern at the dawn of environmental regulation. (AP Photo/Pickerell Family)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/22/2012 3:20:52 PM EST
    This August 1973 photo released by the U.S. National Archives shows the Donald Cook Nuclear Power Plant still under construction on Lake Michigan at Bridgman, Mi. The photo was taken for the "Documerica" program, 1972-1977, instituted by the then new Environmental Protection Agency to document subjects of environmental concern. (AP Photo/U.S. National Archives, Paul Sequeira)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/22/2012 5:50:48 AM EST
    RETRANSMISSION TO ADD NAME OF PHOTOGRAPHER - This undated photo provided by the subject shows "Documerica" photographer Lyntha Scott Eiler. About forty years ago the newly established Environmental Protection Agency sent an army of nearly 100 photographers across the country for the "Documerica" program to capture images of environmental concern at the dawn of environmental regulation. Eiler photographed work and homes on Navajo and Hopi reservations in Arizona. (AP Photo/Terry E. Eiler)