Environment Photos on Townhall

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              Employees  of Hellas Gold, are seen through a burnt van  at a mining facility  near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 20

    Employees of Hellas Gold, are seen through a burnt van at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 20

    Posted: 2/17/2013 2:18:31 PM EST
    Employees of Hellas Gold, are seen through a burnt van at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 masked attackers raided the facilities of a prospective gold mine in northern Greece overnight Sunday, setting machinery and offices alight, authorities said. There has long been opposition to the prospect of a gold mine and processing plant being built at Skouries in the Halkidiki peninsula, with some residents objecting to what they say will be the destruction of the environment and of pristine forest in the area, leading to the loss of tourism and other local activities such as farming, the rearing of livestock and fishing. (AP Photo/Nikolas Giakoumidis)
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              Employees  of Hellas Gold, are stand behind  a burnt van  at a mining facility  near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2

    Employees of Hellas Gold, are stand behind a burnt van at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2

    Posted: 2/17/2013 2:18:31 PM EST
    Employees of Hellas Gold, are stand behind a burnt van at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 masked attackers raided the facilities of a prospective gold mine in northern Greece overnight Sunday, setting machinery and offices alight, authorities said. There has long been opposition to the prospect of a gold mine and processing plant being built at Skouries in the Halkidiki peninsula, with some residents objecting to what they say will be the destruction of the environment and of pristine forest in the area, leading to the loss of tourism and other local activities such as farming, the rearing of livestock and fishing. (AP Photo/Nikolas Giakoumidis)
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              Employees operating cranes remove burnt metal from a mining facility  of Hellas Gold near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb.

    Employees operating cranes remove burnt metal from a mining facility of Hellas Gold near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb.

    Posted: 2/17/2013 2:18:31 PM EST
    Employees operating cranes remove burnt metal from a mining facility of Hellas Gold near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 masked attackers raided the facilities of a prospective gold mine in northern Greece overnight Sunday, setting machinery and offices alight, authorities said. There has long been opposition to the prospect of a gold mine and processing plant being built at Skouries in the Halkidiki peninsula, with some residents objecting to what they say will be the destruction of the environment and of pristine forest in the area, leading to the loss of tourism and other local activities such as farming, the rearing of livestock and fishing. (AP Photo/Nikolas Giakoumidis)
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              Employees  of Hellas Gold, are seen through a burnt van  at a mining facility  near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 20

    Employees of Hellas Gold, are seen through a burnt van at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 20

    Posted: 2/17/2013 2:18:31 PM EST
    Employees of Hellas Gold, are seen through a burnt van at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 masked attackers raided the facilities of a prospective gold mine in northern Greece overnight Sunday, setting machinery and offices alight, authorities said. There has long been opposition to the prospect of a gold mine and processing plant being built at Skouries in the Halkidiki peninsula, with some residents objecting to what they say will be the destruction of the environment and of pristine forest in the area, leading to the loss of tourism and other local activities such as farming, the rearing of livestock and fishing. (AP Photo/Nikolas Giakoumidis)
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              A burnt truck of  Hellas Gold, stands at a mining facility  near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013.  About 40 maske

    A burnt truck of Hellas Gold, stands at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 maske

    Posted: 2/17/2013 2:18:31 PM EST
    A burnt truck of Hellas Gold, stands at a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 masked attackers raided the facilities of a prospective gold mine in northern Greece overnight Sunday, setting machinery and offices alight, authorities said. There has long been opposition to the prospect of a gold mine and processing plant being built at Skouries in the Halkidiki peninsula, with some residents objecting to what they say will be the destruction of the environment and of pristine forest in the area, leading to the loss of tourism and other local activities such as farming, the rearing of livestock and fishing. (AP Photo/Nikolas Giakoumidis)
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              A security guard of Hellas Gold, passes by a burnt mini bus in a mining facility  near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17

    A security guard of Hellas Gold, passes by a burnt mini bus in a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17

    Posted: 2/17/2013 2:18:31 PM EST
    A security guard of Hellas Gold, passes by a burnt mini bus in a mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 masked attackers raided the facilities of a prospective gold mine in northern Greece overnight Sunday, setting machinery and offices alight, authorities said. There has long been opposition to the prospect of a gold mine and processing plant being built at Skouries in the Halkidiki peninsula, with some residents objecting to what they say will be the destruction of the environment and of pristine forest in the area, leading to the loss of tourism and other local activities such as farming, the rearing of livestock and fishing. (AP Photo/Nikolas Giakoumidis)
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              An employee of Hellas Gold, looks at a burnt mining facility  near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013.  About 40 mas

    An employee of Hellas Gold, looks at a burnt mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 mas

    Posted: 2/17/2013 2:18:31 PM EST
    An employee of Hellas Gold, looks at a burnt mining facility near the village of Skouries, located on the northern peninsula of Halkidiki Greece, on Sunday, Feb. 17 2013. About 40 masked attackers raided the facilities of a prospective gold mine in northern Greece overnight Sunday, setting machinery and offices alight, authorities said. There has long been opposition to the prospect of a gold mine and processing plant being built at Skouries in the Halkidiki peninsula, with some residents objecting to what they say will be the destruction of the environment and of pristine forest in the area, leading to the loss of tourism and other local activities such as farming, the rearing of livestock and fishing. (AP Photo/Nikolas Giakoumidis)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2010 file photo, workers monitor a control bank at Solyndra's solar panel factory on in Fremont, Calif.  Homeowners on the hunt for sparkling solar panels are lur

    FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2010 file photo, workers monitor a control bank at Solyndra's solar panel factory on in Fremont, Calif. Homeowners on the hunt for sparkling solar panels are lur

    Posted: 2/10/2013 6:18:26 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2010 file photo, workers monitor a control bank at Solyndra's solar panel factory on in Fremont, Calif. Homeowners on the hunt for sparkling solar panels are lured by ads filled with images of pristine landscapes and bright sunshine, and words about the technology’s benefits for the environment _ and the wallet. What customers may not know is that there’s a dirtier side. While solar is a far less polluting energy source than coal, many panel makers are nevertheless grappling with a hazardous waste problem. Fueled partly by billions in government incentives, the industry is creating millions of solar panels each year and, in the process, millions of pounds of polluted sludge and contaminated water. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
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              This undated photo released on Wednesday Feb. 6, 2013 by the Blue Cross shows a Jack Russell terrier being scanned for a microchip at the Blue Cross Lewknor Rehoming Centre in London. B

    This undated photo released on Wednesday Feb. 6, 2013 by the Blue Cross shows a Jack Russell terrier being scanned for a microchip at the Blue Cross Lewknor Rehoming Centre in London. B

    Posted: 2/6/2013 7:08:21 AM EST
    This undated photo released on Wednesday Feb. 6, 2013 by the Blue Cross shows a Jack Russell terrier being scanned for a microchip at the Blue Cross Lewknor Rehoming Centre in London. British authorities say that all dogs in England will have to be fitted with microchips from 2016. Britain's Environment Department says the chips will help reunite owners with lost or stolen pets, promote animal welfare and take pressure off shelters. (AP Photo/Martin Phelps, Blue Cross)
  •  - A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    Posted: 2/1/2013 9:30:03 PM EST
    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas January 15, 2013. Everyday, thousands of miners go to work in the unregulated coals mines of northern Mexico knowing they may not return. Facing death on a daily basis has become a fact of life for these men as they struggle to scrape out a living in an environment bereft of rules and regulations, lacking even the most basic equipment. Unregulated mines are legal in Mexico. A company buys or leases land from a cooperative and is legally allowed to mine on it, but is not subject to any regulations. Despite the dangers, some 30,000 miners find themselves willing to take the risk, approaching their job with a matter-of-fact philosophy. Picture taken January 15, 2013. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
  •  - A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    Posted: 2/1/2013 9:30:03 PM EST
    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas January 15, 2013. Everyday, thousands of miners go to work in the unregulated coals mines of northern Mexico knowing they may not return. Facing death on a daily basis has become a fact of life for these men as they struggle to scrape out a living in an environment bereft of rules and regulations, lacking even the most basic equipment. Unregulated mines are legal in Mexico. A company buys or leases land from a cooperative and is legally allowed to mine on it, but is not subject to any regulations. Despite the dangers, some 30,000 miners find themselves willing to take the risk, approaching their job with a matter-of-fact philosophy. Picture taken January 15, 2013. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
  •  - A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    Posted: 2/1/2013 9:30:03 PM EST
    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas January 15, 2013. Everyday, thousands of miners go to work in the unregulated coals mines of northern Mexico knowing they may not return. Facing death on a daily basis has become a fact of life for these men as they struggle to scrape out a living in an environment bereft of rules and regulations, lacking even the most basic equipment. Unregulated mines are legal in Mexico. A company buys or leases land from a cooperative and is legally allowed to mine on it, but is not subject to any regulations. Despite the dangers, some 30,000 miners find themselves willing to take the risk, approaching their job with a matter-of-fact philosophy. Picture taken January 15, 2013. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
  •  - A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    Posted: 2/1/2013 5:20:33 PM EST
    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas January 15, 2013. Everyday, thousands of miners go to work in the unregulated coals mines of northern Mexico knowing they may not return. Facing death on a daily basis has become a fact of life for these men as they struggle to scrape out a living in an environment bereft of rules and regulations, lacking even the most basic equipment. Unregulated mines are legal in Mexico. A company buys or leases land from a cooperative and is legally allowed to mine on it, but is not subject to any regulations. Despite the dangers, some 30,000 miners find themselves willing to take the risk, approaching their job with a matter-of-fact philosophy. Picture taken January 15, 2013. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
  •  - A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    Posted: 2/1/2013 5:20:33 PM EST
    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas January 15, 2013. Everyday, thousands of miners go to work in the unregulated coals mines of northern Mexico knowing they may not return. Facing death on a daily basis has become a fact of life for these men as they struggle to scrape out a living in an environment bereft of rules and regulations, lacking even the most basic equipment. Unregulated mines are legal in Mexico. A company buys or leases land from a cooperative and is legally allowed to mine on it, but is not subject to any regulations. Despite the dangers, some 30,000 miners find themselves willing to take the risk, approaching their job with a matter-of-fact philosophy. Picture taken January 15, 2013. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
  •  - A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas

    Posted: 2/1/2013 5:20:33 PM EST
    A cyclist rides past crosses set up for deceased miners in Sabinas January 15, 2013. Everyday, thousands of miners go to work in the unregulated coals mines of northern Mexico knowing they may not return. Facing death on a daily basis has become a fact of life for these men as they struggle to scrape out a living in an environment bereft of rules and regulations, lacking even the most basic equipment. Unregulated mines are legal in Mexico. A company buys or leases land from a cooperative and is legally allowed to mine on it, but is not subject to any regulations. Despite the dangers, some 30,000 miners find themselves willing to take the risk, approaching their job with a matter-of-fact philosophy. Picture taken January 15, 2013. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
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              Shell's Environment Vice President, Allard Castelein, waits for the start of the court case of Nigerian farmers against Shell, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday Jan. 30, 2013. Dutch

    Shell's Environment Vice President, Allard Castelein, waits for the start of the court case of Nigerian farmers against Shell, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday Jan. 30, 2013. Dutch

    Posted: 1/30/2013 6:09:16 AM EST
    Shell's Environment Vice President, Allard Castelein, waits for the start of the court case of Nigerian farmers against Shell, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday Jan. 30, 2013. Dutch judges are ruling in a landmark civil action by Nigerian farmers who want to hold oil giant Shell liable for poisoning their fish ponds and farmlands with leaking pipelines. The decision being announced Wednesday could set a legal precedent for holding multinationals responsible for their actions overseas. Lawyers for the four Nigerians from the oil-rich Niger delta argue Shell makes key policy decisions at its Hague headquarters, so the Dutch court has jurisdiction. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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              Shell's Environment Vice President, Allard Castelein, waits for the start of the court case of Nigerian farmers against Shell, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday Jan. 30, 2013. Dutch

    Shell's Environment Vice President, Allard Castelein, waits for the start of the court case of Nigerian farmers against Shell, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday Jan. 30, 2013. Dutch

    Posted: 1/30/2013 6:09:12 AM EST
    Shell's Environment Vice President, Allard Castelein, waits for the start of the court case of Nigerian farmers against Shell, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday Jan. 30, 2013. Dutch judges have rejected most of a landmark case brought by Nigerian farmers against Royal Dutch Shell for poisoning their fish ponds and farmland with leaking pipelines. The Hague Civil Court rejected all cases against the Netherlands-based company. However, in one case it ordered a subsidiary, Shell Nigeria, to compensate a farmer for breach of duty of care by making it too easy for saboteurs to open an oil pipe. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
  •  - A dolphin struggles to lift its head out of the water in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York

    A dolphin struggles to lift its head out of the water in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York

    Posted: 1/25/2013 7:26:36 PM EST
    A dolphin struggles to lift its head out of the water in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York, January 25, 2013. The sea mammal appeared to struggle in the narrow waterway that stretches 1.8 miles into Brooklyn from New York Harbor. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
  •  - Police look down at a dolphin in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York

    Police look down at a dolphin in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York

    Posted: 1/25/2013 7:26:36 PM EST
    Police look down at a dolphin in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York, January 25, 2013. The sea mammal appeared to struggle in the narrow waterway that stretches 1.8 miles into Brooklyn from New York Harbor. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
  •  - A dolphin struggles to lift its head out of the water in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York

    A dolphin struggles to lift its head out of the water in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York

    Posted: 1/25/2013 7:26:36 PM EST
    A dolphin struggles to lift its head out of the water in the headwaters of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York, January 25, 2013. The sea mammal appeared to struggle in the narrow waterway that stretches 1.8 miles into Brooklyn from New York Harbor. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)


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