emancipation Photos on Townhall

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              Nigeria battalion 1 troops, part of the African led international support mission to Mali sing before their departure, at the peace keeping centre  in Jaji, Kaduna, Nigeria, Thursday, J

    Nigeria battalion 1 troops, part of the African led international support mission to Mali sing before their departure, at the peace keeping centre in Jaji, Kaduna, Nigeria, Thursday, J

    Posted: 1/17/2013 2:18:52 PM EST
    Nigeria battalion 1 troops, part of the African led international support mission to Mali sing before their departure, at the peace keeping centre in Jaji, Kaduna, Nigeria, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. The Federal Government has approved the immediate deployment of 900 troops as part of the ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African States ) force to push for the emancipation of Northern Mali from the grip of Islamists. (AP Photo)
  •  - Willie Glee of Charleston reads from the Emancipation Proclamation during the Watch Night service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston

    Willie Glee of Charleston reads from the Emancipation Proclamation during the Watch Night service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston

    Posted: 1/1/2013 10:06:42 AM EST
    Willie Glee of Charleston reads from the Emancipation Proclamation during the Watch Night service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina December 31, 2012. REUTERS/Randall Hill
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              FILE - This Nov 4, 2010 file photo shows National Archives visitors looking at a display of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation at the National Archives in Washington.

    FILE - This Nov 4, 2010 file photo shows National Archives visitors looking at a display of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation at the National Archives in Washington.

    Posted: 12/29/2012 11:18:32 AM EST
    FILE - This Nov 4, 2010 file photo shows National Archives visitors looking at a display of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation at the National Archives in Washington. As New Year's Day approached 150 years ago, all eyes were on Lincoln in expectation of what he warned 100 days earlier would be coming _ his final proclamation declaring all slaves in states rebelling against the Union to be “forever free.” A tradition began on Dec. 31, 1862, as many black churches held Watch Night services, awaiting word that Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation would take effect as the country was in the midst of a bloody Civil War. Later, congregations listened as the president's historic words were read aloud. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
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              FILE - This Feb. 9, 2009 file photo shows the first draft of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation that Lincoln presented to his full cabinet on July 22, 1862, displayed

    FILE - This Feb. 9, 2009 file photo shows the first draft of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation that Lincoln presented to his full cabinet on July 22, 1862, displayed

    Posted: 12/29/2012 11:18:32 AM EST
    FILE - This Feb. 9, 2009 file photo shows the first draft of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation that Lincoln presented to his full cabinet on July 22, 1862, displayed at the Library of Congress in Washington. As New Year's Day approached 150 years ago, all eyes were on President Abraham Lincoln in expectation of what he warned 100 days earlier would be coming _ his final proclamation declaring all slaves in states rebelling against the Union to be “forever free.”A tradition began on Dec. 31, 1862, as many black churches held Watch Night services, awaiting word that Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation would take effect as the country was in the midst of a bloody Civil War. Later, congregations listened as the president's historic words were read aloud. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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              FILE - This Feb. 18, 2005 file photo shows the original Emancipation Proclamation on display in the Rotunda of the National Archives in Washington. As New Year's Day approached 150 year

    FILE - This Feb. 18, 2005 file photo shows the original Emancipation Proclamation on display in the Rotunda of the National Archives in Washington. As New Year's Day approached 150 year

    Posted: 12/29/2012 11:18:32 AM EST
    FILE - This Feb. 18, 2005 file photo shows the original Emancipation Proclamation on display in the Rotunda of the National Archives in Washington. As New Year's Day approached 150 years ago, all eyes were on President Abraham Lincoln in expectation of what he warned 100 days earlier would be coming _ his final proclamation declaring all slaves in states rebelling against the Union to be "forever free." A tradition began on Dec. 31, 1862, as many black churches held Watch Night services, awaiting word that Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation would take effect as the country was in the midst of a bloody Civil War. Later, congregations listened as the president's historic words were read aloud. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
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              This undated handout photo provided by the Smithsonian shows Nat Turner's bible, part of an exhibit "Changing America," beginning Friday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African

    This undated handout photo provided by the Smithsonian shows Nat Turner's bible, part of an exhibit "Changing America," beginning Friday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African

    Posted: 12/14/2012 10:48:17 AM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the Smithsonian shows Nat Turner's bible, part of an exhibit "Changing America," beginning Friday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, presenting a walk back in time through two different eras. A new exhibit, "Changing America," parallels the 1863 emancipation of slaves with the 1963 March on Washington. It is thought that Nat Turner was holding this Bible when he was captured two months after the rebellion he led against slaveholders in Southampton County, Virginia. Turner worked both as an enslaved field hand and as a minister. A man of remarkable intellect, he was widely respected by black and white people in Southampton County, Virginia. He used his talents as a speaker and his mobility as a preacher to organize the slave revolt. (AP Photo/Michael Barnes, Smithsonian)
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              This undated handout photo provided by the Smithsonian shows Harriet Tubman's shawl, part of an exhibit "Changing America," beginning Friday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Afri

    This undated handout photo provided by the Smithsonian shows Harriet Tubman's shawl, part of an exhibit "Changing America," beginning Friday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Afri

    Posted: 12/14/2012 10:48:17 AM EST
    This undated handout photo provided by the Smithsonian shows Harriet Tubman's shawl, part of an exhibit "Changing America," beginning Friday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, presenting a walk back in time through two different eras. A new exhibit, "Changing America," parallels the 1863 emancipation of slaves with the 1963 March on Washington. (AP Photo/Michael Barnes, Smithsonian)
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              Christen Williams does an interpretative dance at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Abraham L

    Christen Williams does an interpretative dance at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Abraham L

    Posted: 9/21/2012 1:28:38 PM EST
    Christen Williams does an interpretative dance at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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              Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, left, greets Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., after at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, left, greets Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., after at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate

    Posted: 9/21/2012 1:28:38 PM EST
    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, left, greets Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., after at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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              Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center right, speaks about freedom at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary

    Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center right, speaks about freedom at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary

    Posted: 9/21/2012 1:28:38 PM EST
    Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center right, speaks about freedom at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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              This undated photo provided by Seth Kaller, Inc., shows a detail from the rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which sold Tuesday, June 26, 2012,

    This undated photo provided by Seth Kaller, Inc., shows a detail from the rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which sold Tuesday, June 26, 2012,

    Posted: 6/26/2012 6:28:25 PM EST
    This undated photo provided by Seth Kaller, Inc., shows a detail from the rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which sold Tuesday, June 26, 2012, at a New York auction for more than $2 million. It's the second-highest price ever paid for a Lincoln-signed proclamation - after one owned by the late Sen. Robert Kennedy that went for $3.8 million two years ago. (AP Photo/Seth Kaller, Inc.)
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              This undated photo provided by Seth Kaller, Inc., shows a rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which sold Tuesday, June 26, 2012, at a New York au

    This undated photo provided by Seth Kaller, Inc., shows a rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which sold Tuesday, June 26, 2012, at a New York au

    Posted: 6/26/2012 6:28:25 PM EST
    This undated photo provided by Seth Kaller, Inc., shows a rare original copy of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation which sold Tuesday, June 26, 2012, at a New York auction for more than $2 million. It's the second-highest price ever paid for a Lincoln-signed proclamation - after one owned by the late Sen. Robert Kennedy that went for $3.8 million two years ago. (AP Photo/Seth Kaller, Inc.)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:47 AM EST
    Gay rights pioneer Lilli Vincenz, 74, right, and her life partner Nancy Ruth Davis, 75, pose in their home in Arlington, Va., Thursday, May 10, 2012. At the birthplace of the gay rights movement, patrons at New York City's Stonewall Inn said they felt like they were living history. In Wyoming, the mother of a gay man beaten to death said words couldn't express her gratitude. The president's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:47 AM EST
    Gay rights pioneer Lilli Vincenz, 74, right, and her life partner Nancy Ruth Davis, 75, pose intheir home in Arlington, Va., Thursday, May 10, 2012. At the birthplace of the gay rights movement, patrons at New York City's Stonewall Inn said they felt like they were living history. In Wyoming, the mother of a gay man beaten to death said words couldn't express her gratitude. The president's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:47 AM EST
    Amelia Jane Carson, left, and Karen Kleeman listen to instructions from an official at the marriage bureau in the city clerk's office in New York, Thursday, May 10, 2012. Carson and Kleeman, who live in Santa Fe, N.M. and have been together 28 years, traveled to New York for the express purpose of getting married. President Barack Obama's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:47 AM EST
    Whitney Holt, left, talks with her pregnant partner, Brittany Richardson, just before getting married at the city clerk's office in New York, Thursday, May 10, 2012. Richardson and Holt, from Johnson City, Tenn. traveled to New York for the specifically to get married. President Barack Obama's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:46 AM EST
    Karen Kleeman, second from left, hugs Maryanne Schumm, left, while Amelia Jane Carson, second from right, hugs Betty Koster, after Kleeman and Carson were married at the marriage bureau in the city clerk's office in New York, Thursday, May 10, 2012. Carson and Kleeman, who live in Santa Fe, N.M. and have been together 28 years, traveled to New York for the express purpose of getting married. President Barack Obama's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:46 AM EST
    FILE--In this Nov. 18, 1998, file photo, Stacy Jolles, left, and Nina Beck, a lesbian couple who are challenging Vermont's marriage laws, watch arguments at the Vermont Supreme Court in Montpelier, Vt. President Barack Obama's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:46 AM EST
    Stacy Jolles, left, and Nina Beck sit in front of the tea room on Thursday, May 10, 2012 in Burlington, Vt. The couple were part of the first lawsuit that brought civil unions to Vermont. President Barack Obama's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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    Posted: 5/11/2012 2:20:46 AM EST
    Kay Tobin Lahusen, 82, an early photographer of the gay rights movement, poses for a photograph with a portrait of her late partner Barbara Gittings, Thursday, May 10, 2012, in Kennett Square, Pa. President Barack Obama's declaration that he supports gay marriage may have lacked the urgency of Kennedy's push for the Civil Rights Act, or the force and finality of the Emancipation Proclamation, but in places key to the history of gay rights, it's being greeted as a major milestone. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)