Electoral College Photos on Townhall

  •  - Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 1/4/2013 2:04:28 PM EST
    Speaker of the House John Boehner of Ohio (L) sits as U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (C) is handed the vote certificate for the state of Ohio during a joint session of Congress held to certify the electoral college results and deem President Barack Obama the next U.S. president in the Capitol in Washington January 4, 2013. Obama won the vote in the critical swing state of Ohio. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Electoral college ballots certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Electoral college ballots certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 1/4/2013 2:04:28 PM EST
    Congressional staff carry ballot boxes to the House chamber for a joint session of Congress held to certify the electoral college results and deem President Barack Obama the next U.S. president in the Capitol in Washington January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 1/4/2013 2:04:28 PM EST
    Congressional staff pass the vote certificate for the state of Tennessee during a joint session of Congress held to certify the electoral college results and deem President Barack Obama the next U.S. president in the Capitol in Washington January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Biden holds the presidential election electoral college vote certificate with Boehner on Capitol Hill in Washington

    Biden holds the presidential election electoral college vote certificate with Boehner on Capitol Hill in Washington

    Posted: 1/4/2013 2:01:56 PM EST
    U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (L) holds the presidential election electoral college vote certificate representing the state of Ohio alongside House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) (R) during a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, January 4, 2013. Congress gathered for the reading of each state's presidential election results, including Boehner's swing state Ohio which voted for President Barack Obama. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 1/4/2013 2:01:56 PM EST
    Speaker of the House John Boehner of Ohio (L) sits as U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (C) is handed the vote certificate for the state of Ohio during a joint session of Congress held to certify the electoral college results and deem President Barack Obama the next U.S. president in the Capitol in Washington January 4, 2013. Obama won the vote in the critical swing state of Ohio. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Electoral college ballots certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Electoral college ballots certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 1/4/2013 2:01:56 PM EST
    Congressional staff carry ballot boxes to the House chamber for a joint session of Congress held to certify the electoral college results and deem President Barack Obama the next U.S. president in the Capitol in Washington January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Electoral college ballots are certified at the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 1/4/2013 2:01:56 PM EST
    Congressional staff pass the vote certificate for the state of Tennessee during a joint session of Congress held to certify the electoral college results and deem President Barack Obama the next U.S. president in the Capitol in Washington January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - 
              Members of Vermont's electoral college take their oath of office on Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 in Montpelier, Vt. The three Vermonters have cast the state's votes in the Electoral College th

    Members of Vermont's electoral college take their oath of office on Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 in Montpelier, Vt. The three Vermonters have cast the state's votes in the Electoral College th

    Posted: 12/17/2012 2:33:36 PM EST
    Members of Vermont's electoral college take their oath of office on Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 in Montpelier, Vt. The three Vermonters have cast the state's votes in the Electoral College that will formally elect President Barack Obama to a second term. Vermont was the first state whose electoral votes were placed in the column of President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. From left, Sherry Merrick of Post Mills, William Sander of Jeffersonville and State Rep. Kevin Christie of Hartford. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  •  - 
              FILE - This Dec. 12, 2000 file photo shows Supreme Court police lining the steps of the court in Washington, as the nation awaits the court's ruling on the Florida presidential election

    FILE - This Dec. 12, 2000 file photo shows Supreme Court police lining the steps of the court in Washington, as the nation awaits the court's ruling on the Florida presidential election

    Posted: 10/18/2012 3:38:32 PM EST
    FILE - This Dec. 12, 2000 file photo shows Supreme Court police lining the steps of the court in Washington, as the nation awaits the court's ruling on the Florida presidential election. The mere mention of the 2000 election unsettles people in Palm Beach County. The county’s poorly designed “butterfly ballot” confused thousands of voters, arguably costing Democrat Al Gore the state, and thereby the presidency. Gore won the national popular vote by more than a half-million ballots. But George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court decided, 5-4, to halt further Florida recounts, more than a month after Election Day. Bush carried the state by 537 votes, enough for an Electoral College edge, and the White House. (AP Photo/Kenneth Lambert, File)
  •  - 
              FILE -This Nov. 21, 2000 file photo shows Florida Supreme Court spokesman Craig Waters announces the courts 7-0 ruling, on the Capitol step in Tallahassee, Fla., that amended votes tall

    FILE -This Nov. 21, 2000 file photo shows Florida Supreme Court spokesman Craig Waters announces the courts 7-0 ruling, on the Capitol step in Tallahassee, Fla., that amended votes tall

    Posted: 10/18/2012 3:38:32 PM EST
    FILE -This Nov. 21, 2000 file photo shows Florida Supreme Court spokesman Craig Waters announces the courts 7-0 ruling, on the Capitol step in Tallahassee, Fla., that amended votes tallies must be accepted in the state contested presidential election. The mere mention of the 2000 election unsettles people in Palm Beach County. The county’s poorly designed “butterfly ballot” confused thousands of voters, arguably costing Democrat Al Gore the state, and thereby the presidency. Gore won the national popular vote by more than a half-million ballots. But George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court decided, 5-4, to halt further Florida recounts, more than a month after Election Day. Bush carried the state by 537 votes, enough for an Electoral College edge, and the White House. (AP Photo/Pete Cosgrove, File)
  •  - 
              FILE -In this Nov. 8, 2000 file photo, then-Democratic presidential candidate, Vice President Al Gore speaks in Nashville, Tenn., on the current status of the presidential vote recount

    FILE -In this Nov. 8, 2000 file photo, then-Democratic presidential candidate, Vice President Al Gore speaks in Nashville, Tenn., on the current status of the presidential vote recount

    Posted: 10/18/2012 3:38:32 PM EST
    FILE -In this Nov. 8, 2000 file photo, then-Democratic presidential candidate, Vice President Al Gore speaks in Nashville, Tenn., on the current status of the presidential vote recount in Florida. The mere mention of the 2000 election unsettles people in Palm Beach County. The county’s poorly designed “butterfly ballot” confused thousands of voters, arguably costing Democrat Al Gore the state, and thereby the presidency. Gore won the national popular vote by more than a half-million ballots. But George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court decided, 5-4, to halt further Florida recounts, more than a month after Election Day. Bush carried the state by 537 votes, enough for an Electoral College edge, and the White House. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2000 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate, Texas Gov. George W. Bush prepares to make a statement from the governor's mansion in Austin, Texas, con

    FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2000 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate, Texas Gov. George W. Bush prepares to make a statement from the governor's mansion in Austin, Texas, con

    Posted: 10/18/2012 3:38:32 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2000 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate, Texas Gov. George W. Bush prepares to make a statement from the governor's mansion in Austin, Texas, concerning the Florida vote count. The mere mention of the 2000 election unsettles people in Palm Beach County. The county’s poorly designed “butterfly ballot” confused thousands of voters, arguably costing Democrat Al Gore the state, and thereby the presidency. Gore won the national popular vote by more than a half-million ballots. But George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court decided, 5-4, to halt further Florida recounts, more than a month after Election Day. Bush carried the state by 537 votes, enough for an Electoral College edge, and the White House. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - This Nov. 8, 2000 file photo shows Orlando Sentinel election night headlines The first headline was, "Oh, so close," followed by "IT'S BUSH," then "IS IT BUSH?" and lastly "CONTE

    FILE - This Nov. 8, 2000 file photo shows Orlando Sentinel election night headlines The first headline was, "Oh, so close," followed by "IT'S BUSH," then "IS IT BUSH?" and lastly "CONTE

    Posted: 10/18/2012 3:38:32 PM EST
    FILE - This Nov. 8, 2000 file photo shows Orlando Sentinel election night headlines The first headline was, "Oh, so close," followed by "IT'S BUSH," then "IS IT BUSH?" and lastly "CONTESTED." The presidential election is still undecided while the nation waits for Florida's final vote count. The mere mention of the 2000 election unsettles people in Palm Beach County. The county’s poorly designed “butterfly ballot” confused thousands of voters, arguably costing Democrat Al Gore the state, and thereby the presidency. Gore won the national popular vote by more than a half-million ballots. But George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court decided, 5-4, to halt further Florida recounts, more than a month after Election Day. Bush carried the state by 537 votes, enough for an Electoral College edge, and the White House. (AP Photo/Peter Cosgrove, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Nov. 22, 2000 file photo, Broward County, Fla. canvassing board member Judge Robert Rosenberg examines a challenged vote at the Broward County Emergency Operations Center

    FILE - In this Nov. 22, 2000 file photo, Broward County, Fla. canvassing board member Judge Robert Rosenberg examines a challenged vote at the Broward County Emergency Operations Center

    Posted: 10/18/2012 3:38:32 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 22, 2000 file photo, Broward County, Fla. canvassing board member Judge Robert Rosenberg examines a challenged vote at the Broward County Emergency Operations Center in Plantation, Fla. The mere mention of the 2000 election unsettles people in Palm Beach County. The county’s poorly designed “butterfly ballot” confused thousands of voters, arguably costing Democrat Al Gore the state, and thereby the presidency. Gore won the national popular vote by more than a half-million ballots. But George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court decided, 5-4, to halt further Florida recounts, more than a month after Election Day. Bush carried the state by 537 votes, enough for an Electoral College edge, and the White House. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
  •  - 
              In this Sept. 27, 2012, Field coordinator for President Barack Obama Erika  Grantier works in the office in Berlin, N.H. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire. His f

    In this Sept. 27, 2012, Field coordinator for President Barack Obama Erika Grantier works in the office in Berlin, N.H. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire. His f

    Posted: 10/2/2012 3:08:43 AM EST
    In this Sept. 27, 2012, Field coordinator for President Barack Obama Erika Grantier works in the office in Berlin, N.H. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire. His fiscally conservative, socially moderate tenure as governor of neighboring Massachusetts once seemed a good match for New Hampshire’s independent and libertarian-leaning electorate. Yet, Romney trails President Barack Obama in polls in New Hampshire as he does in most other presidential battlegrounds despite spending considerable time and money to lock up the state’s four Electoral College votes. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  •  - 
              In this Sept. 27, 2012, photo. a sign sits in front of the field office for President Barack Obama in Berlin, N.H. Berlin, is an economically hard hit town after loosing its paper mill.

    In this Sept. 27, 2012, photo. a sign sits in front of the field office for President Barack Obama in Berlin, N.H. Berlin, is an economically hard hit town after loosing its paper mill.

    Posted: 10/2/2012 3:08:43 AM EST
    In this Sept. 27, 2012, photo. a sign sits in front of the field office for President Barack Obama in Berlin, N.H. Berlin, is an economically hard hit town after loosing its paper mill. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire. His fiscally conservative, socially moderate tenure as governor of neighboring Massachusetts once seemed a good match for New Hampshire’s independent and libertarian-leaning electorate. Yet, Romney trails Obama in polls in New Hampshire as he does in most other presidential battlegrounds despite spending considerable time and money to lock up the state’s four Electoral College votes.(AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  •  - 
              In this photo taken Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 Norm Small, left, and his son Andrew work at their bowling alley in Berlin, N.H. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire.

    In this photo taken Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 Norm Small, left, and his son Andrew work at their bowling alley in Berlin, N.H. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire.

    Posted: 10/2/2012 3:08:43 AM EST
    In this photo taken Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 Norm Small, left, and his son Andrew work at their bowling alley in Berlin, N.H. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire. His fiscally conservative, socially moderate tenure as governor of neighboring Massachusetts once seemed a good match for New Hampshire’s independent and libertarian-leaning electorate. Yet, Romney trails President Barack Obama in polls in New Hampshire as he does in most other presidential battlegrounds despite spending considerable time and money to lock up the state’s four Electoral College votes. Norm supports Obama.(AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  •  - 
              In this Sept. 27, 2012, photo. the smoke stack from the closed paper mill is  seen in Berlin, N.H. Berlin is an economically hard hit town after loosing its paper mill. Mitt Romney is a

    In this Sept. 27, 2012, photo. the smoke stack from the closed paper mill is seen in Berlin, N.H. Berlin is an economically hard hit town after loosing its paper mill. Mitt Romney is a

    Posted: 10/2/2012 3:08:43 AM EST
    In this Sept. 27, 2012, photo. the smoke stack from the closed paper mill is seen in Berlin, N.H. Berlin is an economically hard hit town after loosing its paper mill. Mitt Romney is a part-time resident of tiny New Hampshire. His fiscally conservative, socially moderate tenure as governor of neighboring Massachusetts once seemed a good match for New Hampshire’s independent and libertarian-leaning electorate. Yet, Romney trails President Barack Obama in polls in New Hampshire as he does in most other presidential battlegrounds despite spending considerable time and money to lock up the state’s four Electoral College votes.(AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2012, file photo Cheryl Banks, left to right, and Genny Armstrong open and process vote-by-mail applications in Cleveland, Ohio, in preparation for early voting

    FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2012, file photo Cheryl Banks, left to right, and Genny Armstrong open and process vote-by-mail applications in Cleveland, Ohio, in preparation for early voting

    Posted: 9/30/2012 10:38:32 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2012, file photo Cheryl Banks, left to right, and Genny Armstrong open and process vote-by-mail applications in Cleveland, Ohio, in preparation for early voting for November presidential election. Five weeks to Election Day, President Barack Obama is within reach of the requisite 270 Electoral College votes needed to win a second term according to an Associated Press analysis. Mitt Romney can still prevail in the race to amass the necessary votes, but his path to victory has become much narrower. To overtake Obama, the Republican challenger would need to quickly gain the upper hand in nearly all of the nine states where he and Obama are competing the hardest. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2012, file photo voters wait for their ballots on day one of early voting for the November presidential election in Des Moines, Iowa. Five weeks to Election Day

    FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2012, file photo voters wait for their ballots on day one of early voting for the November presidential election in Des Moines, Iowa. Five weeks to Election Day

    Posted: 9/30/2012 10:38:32 AM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2012, file photo voters wait for their ballots on day one of early voting for the November presidential election in Des Moines, Iowa. Five weeks to Election Day, President Barack Obama is within reach of the requisite 270 Electoral College votes needed to win a second term according to an Associated Press analysis. Mitt Romney can still prevail in the race to amass the necessary votes, but his path to victory has become much narrower. To overtake Obama, the Republican challenger would need to quickly gain the upper hand in nearly all of the nine states where he and Obama are competing the hardest. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
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