Economic Uncertainty Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 4/8/2012 5:10:46 AM EST
    In this Monday, March 26, 2012 photo, British artist Christiaan Nagel, 29, poses with his art pieces on the roof of his home in east London. Nagel is a street artist, one of a growing band of painters, stencilers and sculptors bringing color to the recession-tattered streets of Britain. As public funding dries up, businesses struggle and economic uncertainty hits collectors' pocketbooks, London's streets have been colonized by artists. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
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    Posted: 4/8/2012 5:10:46 AM EST
    In this Monday, March 26, 2012 photo, pedestrians walk past graffiti in east London. As public funding dries up, businesses struggle and economic uncertainty hits collectors' pocketbooks, London's streets have been colonized by artists. Painters, stencilers and sculptors are bringing color to the recession-tattered streets of Britain. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 2:40:48 PM EST
    KentucyGov. Steve Beshear, second from right, and his running mate Jerry Abramson celebrate their victory with their wives Madeline Abramson, left, and Jane Beshear, right, in Frankfort, Ky., Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. Beshear was re-elected Tuesday, becoming the second Democrat to win a U.S. gubernatorial race this year amid lingering economic uncertainty that's already proving worrisome to President Barack Obama's 2012 effort. (AP Photo/John Flavell)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 2:50:51 AM EST
    Kentucy Gov. Steve Beshear makes his way through a crowd to deliver his victory speech in Frankfort, Ky., Tuesday Nov. 8, 2011. Beshear was re-elected Tuesday, becoming the second Democrat to win a U.S. gubernatorial race this year amid lingering economic uncertainty that's already proving worrisome to President Barack Obama's 2012 effort. (AP Photo/John Flavell)
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    Posted: 11/6/2011 7:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 28, 2011 file photo, children line up to march during a tour at Fort William Henry in Lake George, N.Y. In an effort to boost the number of visitors, the fort?s corporate owners are looking for new ways to update their old exhibits amid a time of economic uncertainty and declining support for museums in general and history museums in particular. It?s a situation all too familiar to the thousands of history museums and historical sites across New York state and the rest of the nation. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
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    Posted: 11/6/2011 7:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 28, 2011 file photo, visitors tour Fort William Henry in Lake George, N.Y. In an effort to boost the number of visitors, the fort?s corporate owners are looking for new ways to update their old exhibits amid a time of economic uncertainty and declining support for museums in general and history museums in particular. It?s a situation all too familiar to the thousands of history museums and historical sites across New York state and the rest of the nation. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
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    Posted: 11/6/2011 7:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 28, 2011 file photo, tourists stand by a British flag during a tour at Fort William Henry in Lake George, N.Y. In an effort to boost the number of visitors, the fort?s corporate owners are looking for new ways to update their old exhibits amid a time of economic uncertainty and declining support for museums in general and history museums in particular. It?s a situation all too familiar to the thousands of history museums and historical sites across New York state and the rest of the nation. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
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    Posted: 11/6/2011 7:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 28, 2011 file photo, visitors walk past a cannon and a display at Fort William Henry in Lake George, N.Y. In an effort to boost the number of visitors, the fort?s corporate owners are looking for new ways to update their old exhibits amid a time of economic uncertainty and declining support for museums in general and history museums in particular. It?s a situation all too familiar to the thousands of history museums and historical sites across New York state and the rest of the nation. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
  •  - A businessman walks past a Hyundai Motor's Avante displayed for customers at the automaker's dealership in Seoul

    A businessman walks past a Hyundai Motor's Avante displayed for customers at the automaker's dealership in Seoul

    Posted: 10/27/2011 3:45:37 AM EST
    A businessman walks past a Hyundai Motor's Avante displayed for customers at the automaker's dealership in Seoul October 27, 2011. South Korea's Hyundai Motor warned of rising competition and economic uncertainty after it posted on Thursday a 21 percent rise in quarterly net profit, fueled by solid sales gains in the United States, Europe and other markets. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
  •  - A Hyundai Motor logo is seen on the wheel of an Avante car displayed for customers at the automaker's dealership in Seoul

    A Hyundai Motor logo is seen on the wheel of an Avante car displayed for customers at the automaker's dealership in Seoul

    Posted: 10/27/2011 3:39:56 AM EST
    A Hyundai Motor logo is seen on the wheel of an Avante car displayed for customers at the automaker's dealership in Seoul October 27, 2011. South Korea's Hyundai Motor warned of rising competition and economic uncertainty after it posted on Thursday a 21 percent rise in quarterly net profit, fueled by solid sales gains in the United States, Europe and other markets. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS LOGO)
  •  - A Hyundai Motor salesperson talks on a phone at the automaker's dealership in Seoul

    A Hyundai Motor salesperson talks on a phone at the automaker's dealership in Seoul

    Posted: 10/27/2011 3:38:23 AM EST
    A Hyundai Motor salesperson talks on a phone at the automaker's dealership in Seoul October 27, 2011. South Korea's Hyundai Motor warned of rising competition and economic uncertainty after it posted on Thursday a 21 percent rise in quarterly net profit, fueled by solid sales gains in the United States, Europe and other markets. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
  •  - Ericsson CEO Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm

    Ericsson CEO Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm

    Posted: 10/20/2011 5:33:22 AM EST
    Ericsson CEO Hans Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm October 20, 2011. Ericsson, the world's biggest mobile network gear maker, posted core profit well above expectations on Thursday but said economic uncertainty meant telecoms operators might rein in future spending. REUTERS/Leif R Jansson (SWEDEN - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. SWEDEN OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SWEDEN
  •  - Ericsson CEO Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm

    Ericsson CEO Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm

    Posted: 10/20/2011 5:32:02 AM EST
    Ericsson CEO Hans Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm October 20, 2011. Ericsson, the world's biggest mobile network gear maker, posted core profit well above expectations on Thursday but said economic uncertainty meant telecoms operators might rein in future spending. REUTERS/Leif R Jansson (SWEDEN - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. SWEDEN OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SWEDEN
  •  - Ericsson CEO Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm

    Ericsson CEO Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm

    Posted: 10/20/2011 5:31:03 AM EST
    Ericsson CEO Hans Vesterberg gestures during a news conference in Stockholm October 20, 2011. Ericsson, the world's biggest mobile network gear maker, posted core profit well above expectations on Thursday but said economic uncertainty meant telecoms operators might rein in future spending. REUTERS/Leif R Jansson (SWEDEN - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. SWEDEN OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SWEDEN
  •  - Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda and South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak attend a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul

    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda and South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak attend a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul

    Posted: 10/19/2011 3:21:17 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (L) and South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak attend a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul October 19, 2011. South Korea and Japan agreed to expand their currency swap arrangements more than five-fold on Wednesday, saying global economic uncertainty was deepening and that sufficient pre-emptive arrangements were needed. REUTERS/Kim Jae-hwan/Pool (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - South Korea's President Lee speaks next to Japan's PM Noda during a joint news conference in Seoul

    South Korea's President Lee speaks next to Japan's PM Noda during a joint news conference in Seoul

    Posted: 10/19/2011 1:48:12 AM EST
    South Korea's President Lee Myung-Bak (R) speaks next to Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda during a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul October 19, 2011. South Korea and Japan agreed to expand their currency swap arrangements more than five-fold on Wednesday, saying global economic uncertainty was deepening and that sufficient pre-emptive arrangements were needed. REUTERS/Kim Jae-hwan/Pool (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Japan's PM Noda speaks next to South Korean President Lee during a joint news conference in Seoul

    Japan's PM Noda speaks next to South Korean President Lee during a joint news conference in Seoul

    Posted: 10/19/2011 1:39:59 AM EST
    Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda (L) speaks next to South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak during a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul October 19, 2011. South Korea and Japan agreed to expand their currency swap arrangements more than five-fold on Wednesday, saying global economic uncertainty was deepening and that sufficient pre-emptive arrangements were needed. REUTERS/Kim Jae-hwan/Pool (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - South Korea's President Lee speaks next to Japan's PM Noda during a joint news conference in Seoul

    South Korea's President Lee speaks next to Japan's PM Noda during a joint news conference in Seoul

    Posted: 10/19/2011 1:32:13 AM EST
    South Korea's President Lee Myung-Bak (R) speaks next to Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda during a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul October 19, 2011. South Korea and Japan agreed to expand their currency swap arrangements more than five-fold on Wednesday, saying global economic uncertainty was deepening and that sufficient pre-emptive arrangements were needed. REUTERS/Kim Jae-hwan/Pool (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - South Korean President Lee shakes hands with Japan's PM Noda after a joint news conference in Seoul

    South Korean President Lee shakes hands with Japan's PM Noda after a joint news conference in Seoul

    Posted: 10/19/2011 1:30:04 AM EST
    South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak (R) shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda after a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul October 19, 2011. South Korea and Japan agreed to expand their currency swap arrangements more than five-fold on Wednesday, saying global economic uncertainty was deepening and that sufficient pre-emptive arrangements were needed. REUTERS/Kim Jae-hwan/Pool (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - Canada's Central Bank Governor Carney delivers remarks at the IIF annual meeting in Washington

    Canada's Central Bank Governor Carney delivers remarks at the IIF annual meeting in Washington

    Posted: 9/25/2011 10:37:19 AM EST
    Canada's Central Bank Governor Mark Carney delivers remarks at the Institute of International Finance (IIF) annual meeting in Washington September 25, 2011. The current global economic uncertainty is no reason to delay financial regulatory reform, Carney said on Sunday, rejecting what he called the "fatalism" of critics in the banking industry. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT)