Earmarks Photos on Townhall

  •  - 
              A suspected crack user sits on the side of a street as police patrol the neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo Stat

    A suspected crack user sits on the side of a street as police patrol the neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo Stat

    Posted: 5/9/2013 3:47:35 PM EST
    A suspected crack user sits on the side of a street as police patrol the neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alckmin announced the upcoming launch of a program that gives families of crack cocaine abusers money to pay for their rehabilitation in private treatment centers. The plan announced Thursday earmarks $650 a month for each crack user aged 18 or over who voluntarily enrolls in a rehabilitation program expected to get under way in two months in 11 cities. The city of Sao Paulo is not included because users in the state capital are attended by a network of public treatment centers. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
  •  - 
              Policemen talk with a suspected crack user in a neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown  Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alckm

    Policemen talk with a suspected crack user in a neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alckm

    Posted: 5/9/2013 3:47:35 PM EST
    Policemen talk with a suspected crack user in a neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alckmin announced the upcoming launch of a program that gives families of crack cocaine abusers money to pay for their rehabilitation in private treatment centers. The plan announced Thursday earmarks $650 a month for each crack user aged 18 or over who voluntarily enrolls in a rehabilitation program expected to get under way in two months in 11 cities. The city of Sao Paulo is not included because users in the state capital are attended by a network of public treatment centers. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
  •  - 
              A man, second from left, smokes crack cocaine in a neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alc

    A man, second from left, smokes crack cocaine in a neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alc

    Posted: 5/9/2013 3:47:35 PM EST
    A man, second from left, smokes crack cocaine in a neighborhood popularly known as "Crackland" in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alckmin announced the upcoming launch of a program that gives families of crack cocaine abusers money to pay for their rehabilitation in private treatment centers. The plan announced Thursday earmarks $650 a month for each crack user aged 18 or over who voluntarily enrolls in a rehabilitation program expected to get under way in two months in 11 cities. The city of Sao Paulo is not included because users in the state capital are attended by a network of public treatment centers. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
  •  - 
              French firemen carry the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 20

    French firemen carry the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 20

    Posted: 4/28/2013 10:48:24 AM EST
    French firemen carry the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2013. Five people was killed and ten others injured, according to firefighters, and Reims mayor Adeline Hazan said it awas “a very powerful explosion” and the blast had the earmarks of a possible domestic gas explosion. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)
  •  - 
              French firemen carry the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 20

    French firemen carry the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 20

    Posted: 4/28/2013 10:48:24 AM EST
    French firemen carry the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2013. Five people was killed and ten others injured, according to firefighters, and Reims mayor Adeline Hazan said it awas “a very powerful explosion” and the blast had the earmarks of a possible domestic gas explosion. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)
  •  - 
              French firemen remove the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2

    French firemen remove the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2

    Posted: 4/28/2013 10:48:24 AM EST
    French firemen remove the body of an unidentified victim from a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2013. Five people was killed and ten others injured, according to firefighters, and Reims mayor Adeline Hazan said it awas “a very powerful explosion” and the blast had the earmarks of a possible domestic gas explosion. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)
  •  - 
              French firemen attend the scene of a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2013.  Five people was kille

    French firemen attend the scene of a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2013. Five people was kille

    Posted: 4/28/2013 10:48:24 AM EST
    French firemen attend the scene of a building hit by an explosion that caused the collapse of its inside floors, in Reims, eastern France, Sunday, April 28, 2013. Five people was killed and ten others injured, according to firefighters, and Reims mayor Adeline Hazan said it awas “a very powerful explosion” and the blast had the earmarks of a possible domestic gas explosion. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)
  •  - 
              In this Sept. 25, 2012, photo, Missouri Republican Senate candidate, Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., speaks during a news conference at the start of a statewide bus tour in St. Louis. Akin has b

    In this Sept. 25, 2012, photo, Missouri Republican Senate candidate, Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., speaks during a news conference at the start of a statewide bus tour in St. Louis. Akin has b

    Posted: 10/1/2012 4:23:24 AM EST
    In this Sept. 25, 2012, photo, Missouri Republican Senate candidate, Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., speaks during a news conference at the start of a statewide bus tour in St. Louis. Akin has backed millions of dollars of earmarks in recent years. He even proudly defended an earmark for military armor during a TV ad in his Republican Senate primary. Now Akin has aligned himself with a group that wants to ban earmarks. And the membership of the Senate Conservatives Fund has pledged $290,000 to help finance his campaign against Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. Akin denies he has flip-flopped and rejects any assertion of a quid pro quo for campaign cash. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this March 21, 2010 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., uses his PDA to photograph demonstrators outside on the U.S. Capitol as the House prepares to vote on health c

    FILE - In this March 21, 2010 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., uses his PDA to photograph demonstrators outside on the U.S. Capitol as the House prepares to vote on health c

    Posted: 7/16/2012 4:53:39 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 21, 2010 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., uses his PDA to photograph demonstrators outside on the U.S. Capitol as the House prepares to vote on health care reform in Washington. When Jackson disappeared on a mysterious medical leave in June 2012, it took weeks for anyone in Washington to notice. Jackson has never lived up to the high expectations on the national stage. But none of that seems to matter in his district, where he’s brought home close to $1 billion in earmarks and other funding and won every election since 1995 in a landslide, despite nagging ethical questions over links to imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The dual roles could help explain why the Democrat has given so few details of his medical leave. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
  •  - 
              In this May 17, 2004 photo, U.S. Rep Jesse Jackson Jr. speaks at a vendor economic summit in Park Forest, Ill., regarding a proposed third airport. When Jackson disappeared on a mysteri

    In this May 17, 2004 photo, U.S. Rep Jesse Jackson Jr. speaks at a vendor economic summit in Park Forest, Ill., regarding a proposed third airport. When Jackson disappeared on a mysteri

    Posted: 7/16/2012 4:33:25 PM EST
    In this May 17, 2004 photo, U.S. Rep Jesse Jackson Jr. speaks at a vendor economic summit in Park Forest, Ill., regarding a proposed third airport. When Jackson disappeared on a mysterious medical leave in June 2012, it took weeks for anyone in Washington to notice. Jackson has never lived up to the high expectations on the national stage. But none of that seems to matter in his district, where he’s brought home close to $1 billion in earmarks and other funding and won every election since 1995 in a landslide, despite nagging ethical questions over links to imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The dual roles could help explain why the Democrat has given so few details of his medical leave. (AP Photo/Chicago Sun-Times, Jean Lachat) CHICAGO LOCALS OUT, MAGS OUT
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2011 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is pictured before a ceremonial swearing in of the Congressional Black Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington. Whe

    FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2011 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is pictured before a ceremonial swearing in of the Congressional Black Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington. Whe

    Posted: 7/16/2012 4:33:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2011 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is pictured before a ceremonial swearing in of the Congressional Black Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington. When Jackson disappeared on a mysterious medical leave in June 2012, it took weeks for anyone there to notice. Jackson has never lived up to the high expectations on the national stage. But none of that seems to matter in his district, where he’s brought home close to $1 billion in earmarks and other funding and won every election since 1995 in a landslide, despite nagging ethical questions over links to imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The dual roles could help explain why the Democrat has given so few details of his medical leave. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this March 20, 2012 file photo, U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., his wife Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson, and their children Jessica, 12, and Jesse III, 8, thank supporter

    FILE - In this March 20, 2012 file photo, U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., his wife Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson, and their children Jessica, 12, and Jesse III, 8, thank supporter

    Posted: 7/16/2012 4:33:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 20, 2012 file photo, U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., his wife Chicago Alderman Sandi Jackson, and their children Jessica, 12, and Jesse III, 8, thank supporters after his primary election win over challenger, former Rep. Debbie Halvorson in Illinois' 2nd District. When Jackson disappeared on a mysterious medical leave in June 2012, it took weeks for anyone in Washington to notice. Jackson has never lived up to the high expectations on the national stage. But none of that seems to matter in his district, where he’s brought home close to $1 billion in earmarks and other funding and won every election since 1995 in a landslide, despite nagging ethical questions over links to imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The dual roles could help explain why the Democrat has given so few details of his medical leave. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
  •  - 
              FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2011 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is seen during the dedication of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington. When Jackson disappeared on

    FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2011 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is seen during the dedication of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington. When Jackson disappeared on

    Posted: 7/16/2012 4:33:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2011 file photo, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., is seen during the dedication of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington. When Jackson disappeared on a mysterious medical leave in June 2012, it took weeks for anyone in Washington to notice. Jackson has never lived up to the high expectations on the national stage. But none of that seems to matter in his district, where he’s brought home close to $1 billion in earmarks and other funding and won every election since 1995 in a landslide, despite nagging ethical questions over links to imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The dual roles could help explain why the Democrat has given so few details of his medical leave. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/12/2012 5:55:46 AM EST
    This photo provided March 30, 2012, the Hawaii State Dept. of Health shows a male mosquito, Aedes aegypti, like the ones found at the Honolulu airport in January, 2012. After losing federal earmarks, Hawaii lawmakers are looking for state money to fund inspectors preventing pests from entering the islands and threatening local farms and the environment. The loss of Congressional earmarks mean Maui's airport will lost most of its inspectors if no state money is found to pay their salaries. (AP Photo/Hawaii State Dept. of Health)
  •  -
    Posted: 4/12/2012 5:55:45 AM EST
    This photo provided March 30, 2012, by the Hawaii State Dept. of Health shows a female mosquito, Aedes aegypti, like the ones found at the Honolulu airport in January, 2012. After losing federal earmarks, Hawaii lawmakers are looking for state money to fund inspectors preventing pests from entering the islands and threatening local farms and the environment. The loss of Congressional earmarks mean Maui's airport will lost most of its inspectors if no state money is found to pay their salaries. (AP Photo/Hawaii State Dept. of Health)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/23/2011 8:15:56 PM EST
    In this Nov. 4, 2010 photo, Rep.-elect Bobby Schilling, R-Ill., talks with The Associated Press, in Moline, Ill. Hard-charging Republicans who rallied voters last year with cries of stop the spending, ban the earmarks are quietly offering a more familiar Washington refrain now they?re in Congress - not in my back yard. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/23/2011 8:15:56 PM EST
    FILE - In this May 4, 2011, File photo Rep. Vicky Hartzler, R-Mo. listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Hard-charging Republicans who rallied voters last year with cries of stop the spending, ban the earmarks are quietly offering a more familiar Washington refrain now they?re in Congress - not in my back yard. (AP Photo/Harry Hamburg)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/23/2011 8:15:55 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2010, file photo, Rep.-elect Steven Palazzo, R-Miss., talks with the media on Capitol Hill in Washington during Congressional freshmen orientation. Hard-charging Republicans who rallied voters last year with cries of stop the spending, ban the earmarks are quietly offering a more familiar Washington refrain now they?re in Congress - not in my back yard. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
  •  - U.S. President Bush speaks in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington

    U.S. President Bush speaks in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington

    Posted: 1/29/2008 4:03:06 PM EST
    U.S. President George W. Bush speaks during the signing of the Executive Order protecting American Taxpayers from Government Spending on Wasteful Earmarks in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington January 29, 2008. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)
  •  - US President George W. Bush speaks during the signing of the Executive Order protecting American Taxpayers from Government Spending on Wasteful Earmarks in the Oval Office at the White House in Washin

    US President George W. Bush speaks during the signing of the Executive Order protecting American Taxpayers from Government Spending on Wasteful Earmarks in the Oval Office at the White House in Washin

    Posted: 1/29/2008 3:58:53 PM EST
    US President George W. Bush speaks during the signing of the Executive Order protecting American Taxpayers from Government Spending on Wasteful Earmarks in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington January 29, 2008. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES)