Drugs Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this April 9, 2001, file photo, Lance Armstrong, left, appears during a news conference regarding doping accusations in Paris, as his lawyer Georges Kiejman watches. After a d

    FILE - In this April 9, 2001, file photo, Lance Armstrong, left, appears during a news conference regarding doping accusations in Paris, as his lawyer Georges Kiejman watches. After a d

    Posted: 1/15/2013 2:33:41 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 9, 2001, file photo, Lance Armstrong, left, appears during a news conference regarding doping accusations in Paris, as his lawyer Georges Kiejman watches. After a decade of denial and being stripped of his titles, Armstrong has finally come clean_ During an interview with Oprah Winfrey taped Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, Armstrong said he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France cycling race, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Laurent Rebours, File)
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              A coca vendor shows her coca leaves for sale as she waits for clients inside a legal coca leaf market in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. President Evo Morales' global crusade to

    A coca vendor shows her coca leaves for sale as she waits for clients inside a legal coca leaf market in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. President Evo Morales' global crusade to

    Posted: 1/11/2013 3:08:33 PM EST
    A coca vendor shows her coca leaves for sale as she waits for clients inside a legal coca leaf market in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. President Evo Morales' global crusade to decriminalize the coca leaf, launched in 2006 after the coca growers' union leader was first elected president of Bolivia, has finally attained a partial, if largely, symbolic victory. A year ago, Bolivia temporarily withdrew from the 1961 U.N. convention on narcotic drugs because it classifies coca leaf, the raw material of cocaine, as an illicit drug. It has now rejoined, with one important caveat: The centuries-old Andean practice of chewing or otherwise ingesting coca leaves, a mild stimulant in its natural form, will now be universally recognized as legal within Bolivia. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
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              A market vendor shows her coca leaves to the camera as she waits for clients, to which she sells one pound of leaves for 35 Bolivianos, or about $5 U.S. dollars, inside a legal coca lea

    A market vendor shows her coca leaves to the camera as she waits for clients, to which she sells one pound of leaves for 35 Bolivianos, or about $5 U.S. dollars, inside a legal coca lea

    Posted: 1/11/2013 3:08:33 PM EST
    A market vendor shows her coca leaves to the camera as she waits for clients, to which she sells one pound of leaves for 35 Bolivianos, or about $5 U.S. dollars, inside a legal coca leaf market in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. President Evo Morales' global crusade to decriminalize the coca leaf, launched in 2006 after the coca growers' union leader was first elected president of Bolivia, has finally attained a partial, if largely, symbolic victory. A year ago, Bolivia temporarily withdrew from the 1961 U.N. convention on narcotic drugs because it classifies coca leaf, the raw material of cocaine, as an illicit drug. It has now rejoined, with one important caveat: The centuries-old Andean practice of chewing or otherwise ingesting coca leaves, a mild stimulant in its natural form, will now be universally recognized as legal within Bolivia. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
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              People enter a legal coca leaf market, some carrying bags of coca leaves, under a stained glass window decorated with an image of a coca leaf in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013.

    People enter a legal coca leaf market, some carrying bags of coca leaves, under a stained glass window decorated with an image of a coca leaf in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013.

    Posted: 1/11/2013 3:08:33 PM EST
    People enter a legal coca leaf market, some carrying bags of coca leaves, under a stained glass window decorated with an image of a coca leaf in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. President Evo Morales' global crusade to decriminalize the coca leaf, launched in 2006 after the coca growers' union leader was first elected president of Bolivia, has finally attained a partial, if largely, symbolic victory. A year ago, Bolivia temporarily withdrew from the 1961 U.N. convention on narcotic drugs because it classifies coca leaf, the raw material of cocaine, as an illicit drug. It has now rejoined, with one important caveat: The centuries-old Andean practice of chewing or otherwise ingesting coca leaves, a mild stimulant in its natural form, will now be universally recognized as legal within Bolivia. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
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              Gift bags of coca leaves with packaging that reads in Spanish "God created coca leaves and no one will be able to prohibit its consumption" lay at a coca vendor's stall, to be handed ou

    Gift bags of coca leaves with packaging that reads in Spanish "God created coca leaves and no one will be able to prohibit its consumption" lay at a coca vendor's stall, to be handed ou

    Posted: 1/11/2013 3:08:33 PM EST
    Gift bags of coca leaves with packaging that reads in Spanish "God created coca leaves and no one will be able to prohibit its consumption" lay at a coca vendor's stall, to be handed out to people attending an upcoming event celebrating traditional coca chewing, at a legal coca leaf market in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. President Evo Morales' global crusade to decriminalize the coca leaf, launched in 2006 after the coca growers' union leader was first elected president of Bolivia, has finally attained a partial, if largely, symbolic victory. A year ago, Bolivia temporarily withdrew from the 1961 U.N. convention on narcotic drugs because it classifies coca leaf, the raw material of cocaine, as an illicit drug. It has now rejoined, with one important caveat: The centuries-old Andean practice of chewing or otherwise ingesting coca leaves, a mild stimulant in its natural form, will now be universally recognized as legal within Bolivia. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
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              FILE - This combination image made of file photos shows Lance Armstrong, left, on Oct. 7, 2012, and Oprah Winfrey, right, on March 9, 2012. According to a release posted on Oprah's webs

    FILE - This combination image made of file photos shows Lance Armstrong, left, on Oct. 7, 2012, and Oprah Winfrey, right, on March 9, 2012. According to a release posted on Oprah's webs

    Posted: 1/8/2013 10:03:17 PM EST
    FILE - This combination image made of file photos shows Lance Armstrong, left, on Oct. 7, 2012, and Oprah Winfrey, right, on March 9, 2012. According to a release posted on Oprah's website on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, Armstrong has agreed to a rare televised interview that will air next week and will address allegations that he used performance-enhancing drugs during his cycling career. (AP Photos/File)
  •  - File photo of Astana rider Armstrong of the U.S. preparing to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco

    File photo of Astana rider Armstrong of the U.S. preparing to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:11:51 PM EST
    Astana rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. prepares to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco in this July 4, 2009 file photo. Armstrong, the disgraced American cyclist at the center of the biggest doping scandal in the sport's history, may admit he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career, the New York Times reported in editions on January 5, 2013, citing "several people with direct knowledge of the situation." The newspaper said Armstrong, 41, has told associates and anti-doping officials he may make the admission in hopes of persuading anti-doping officials to allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which Armstrong is currently subject to a lifetime ban. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier/Files
  •  - File photo of Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. posing on the podium of the 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris

    File photo of Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. posing on the podium of the 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:11:51 PM EST
    Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. poses on the podium in Paris after the final 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris in this July 25, 2010 file photo. Armstrong, the disgraced American cyclist at the center of the biggest doping scandal in the sport's history, may admit he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career, the New York Times reported in editions on January 5, 2013, citing "several people with direct knowledge of the situation." The newspaper said Armstrong, 41, has told associates and anti-doping officials he may make the admission in hopes of persuading anti-doping officials to allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which Armstrong is currently subject to a lifetime ban. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard/Files
  •  - File photo of Astana rider Armstrong of the U.S. preparing to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco

    File photo of Astana rider Armstrong of the U.S. preparing to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:11:51 PM EST
    Astana rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. prepares to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco in this July 4, 2009 file photo. Armstrong, the disgraced American cyclist at the center of the biggest doping scandal in the sport's history, may admit he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career, the New York Times reported in editions on January 5, 2013, citing "several people with direct knowledge of the situation." The newspaper said Armstrong, 41, has told associates and anti-doping officials he may make the admission in hopes of persuading anti-doping officials to allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which Armstrong is currently subject to a lifetime ban. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier/Files
  •  - File photo of Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. posing on the podium of the 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris

    File photo of Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. posing on the podium of the 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:11:51 PM EST
    Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. poses on the podium in Paris after the final 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris in this July 25, 2010 file photo. Armstrong, the disgraced American cyclist at the center of the biggest doping scandal in the sport's history, may admit he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career, the New York Times reported in editions on January 5, 2013, citing "several people with direct knowledge of the situation." The newspaper said Armstrong, 41, has told associates and anti-doping officials he may make the admission in hopes of persuading anti-doping officials to allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which Armstrong is currently subject to a lifetime ban. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard/Files
  •  - File photo of Astana rider Armstrong of the U.S. preparing to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco

    File photo of Astana rider Armstrong of the U.S. preparing to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:11:51 PM EST
    Astana rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. prepares to start the individual time trial in the first stage of the 96th Tour de France cycling race in Monaco in this July 4, 2009 file photo. Armstrong, the disgraced American cyclist at the center of the biggest doping scandal in the sport's history, may admit he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career, the New York Times reported in editions on January 5, 2013, citing "several people with direct knowledge of the situation." The newspaper said Armstrong, 41, has told associates and anti-doping officials he may make the admission in hopes of persuading anti-doping officials to allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which Armstrong is currently subject to a lifetime ban. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier/Files
  •  - File photo of Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. posing on the podium of the 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris

    File photo of Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. posing on the podium of the 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris

    Posted: 1/5/2013 4:11:51 PM EST
    Radioshack team rider Lance Armstrong of the U.S. poses on the podium in Paris after the final 20th stage of the 97th Tour de France cycling race between Longjumeau and Paris in this July 25, 2010 file photo. Armstrong, the disgraced American cyclist at the center of the biggest doping scandal in the sport's history, may admit he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career, the New York Times reported in editions on January 5, 2013, citing "several people with direct knowledge of the situation." The newspaper said Armstrong, 41, has told associates and anti-doping officials he may make the admission in hopes of persuading anti-doping officials to allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code, under which Armstrong is currently subject to a lifetime ban. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard/Files
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              FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Hampshire shows David Kwiatkowski, a former lab technician at Exeter, N.H., Hospital. Kwiatkowski is accused

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Hampshire shows David Kwiatkowski, a former lab technician at Exeter, N.H., Hospital. Kwiatkowski is accused

    Posted: 12/22/2012 3:43:30 PM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Hampshire shows David Kwiatkowski, a former lab technician at Exeter, N.H., Hospital. Kwiatkowski is accused of stealing drugs and infecting patients with hepatitis C through contaminated syringes. Five months after Kwiatkowski's arrest in New Hampshire, a dozen former patients in other states have tested positive for the same strain of hepatitis C he’s accused of spreading. But thousands more have yet to be tested for the liver-destroying disease. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office, File)
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              In this Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 photo, a man walks past an expansion of the Tijuana Cultural Center known as "The Cube," designed by architect Eugenio Velazquez, in Tijuana, Mexico. Velazq

    In this Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 photo, a man walks past an expansion of the Tijuana Cultural Center known as "The Cube," designed by architect Eugenio Velazquez, in Tijuana, Mexico. Velazq

    Posted: 12/10/2012 4:13:20 AM EST
    In this Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 photo, a man walks past an expansion of the Tijuana Cultural Center known as "The Cube," designed by architect Eugenio Velazquez, in Tijuana, Mexico. Velazquez doesn't fit the mold of the down-on-his luck, uneducated, underemployed courier who ferries drugs to the United States for Mexican drug cartels. Yet, now he awaits sentencing in San Diego for concealing 12.8 pounds of cocaine while entering the U.S. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
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              FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2003 file photo New York Jets lineman Jason Fabini, center, talks with teammates during an NFL football practice in Hempstead, N.Y. FBI agents raided properties i

    FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2003 file photo New York Jets lineman Jason Fabini, center, talks with teammates during an NFL football practice in Hempstead, N.Y. FBI agents raided properties i

    Posted: 12/7/2012 12:13:49 PM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2003 file photo New York Jets lineman Jason Fabini, center, talks with teammates during an NFL football practice in Hempstead, N.Y. FBI agents raided properties in northeast Indiana Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 belonging to the former NFL lineman and his brother as part of an ongoing investigation by a task force that focuses on combatting illegal drugs and violent crime. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
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              The FBI and local law enforcement search the home of Michael Fabini, brother of National Football League player Jason Fabini, Thursday,  Dec. 6, 2012 at Cherry Hill Parkway in Fort Wayn

    The FBI and local law enforcement search the home of Michael Fabini, brother of National Football League player Jason Fabini, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 at Cherry Hill Parkway in Fort Wayn

    Posted: 12/7/2012 11:48:21 AM EST
    The FBI and local law enforcement search the home of Michael Fabini, brother of National Football League player Jason Fabini, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 at Cherry Hill Parkway in Fort Wayne, Ind. Federal, state and local officers with the Safe Streets Task Force raided a Fort Wayne property owned by Jason Fabini, a home owned by his brother, Michael Fabini, and five other area properties Thursday. FBI Special Agent David Crawford declined Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, to say why the properties were raided, saying only that there was “investigative activity” going on there. The task force focuses on combatting illegal drugs and violent crime. (AP Photo/The Journal Gazette, Swikar Patel) MANDATORY CREDIT
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              An FBI agent speaks with the family of Michael Fabini, brother of former National Football League player Jason Fabini, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 morning, at Cherry Hill Parkway in Fort Way

    An FBI agent speaks with the family of Michael Fabini, brother of former National Football League player Jason Fabini, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 morning, at Cherry Hill Parkway in Fort Way

    Posted: 12/7/2012 11:48:21 AM EST
    An FBI agent speaks with the family of Michael Fabini, brother of former National Football League player Jason Fabini, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 morning, at Cherry Hill Parkway in Fort Wayne, Ind. Federal, state and local officers with the Safe Streets Task Force raided a Fort Wayne property owned by Jason Fabini, a home owned by his brother, Michael Fabini, and five other area properties Thursday. FBI Special Agent David Crawford declined Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, to say why the properties were raided, saying only that there was “investigative activity” going on there. The task force focuses on combatting illegal drugs and violent crime. (AP Photo/The Journal Gazette, Swikar Patel) MANDATORY CREDIT
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              FILE - In this Aug. 1, 1970, file photo, youths sell marijuana openly from sacks at a banned music festival in Middlefield, Conn. beneath a sign advertising their products as "Mexican C

    FILE - In this Aug. 1, 1970, file photo, youths sell marijuana openly from sacks at a banned music festival in Middlefield, Conn. beneath a sign advertising their products as "Mexican C

    Posted: 12/6/2012 4:58:25 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 1, 1970, file photo, youths sell marijuana openly from sacks at a banned music festival in Middlefield, Conn. beneath a sign advertising their products as "Mexican Coletus at $10 an ounce."As the conformity of the postwar era took hold, getting high on marijuana and other drugs emerged as a symbol of the counterculture, with Jack Kerouac and the rest of the Beat Generation singing pot's praises. On the occasion of “Legalization Day,” Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, when Washington’s new law takes effect, AP takes a look back at the cultural and legal status of the “evil weed” in American history. (AP Photo/File)
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              FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Hampshire shows David Kwiatkowski, a former lab technician at Exeter, N.H., Hospital.  Kwiatkowski, accused

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Hampshire shows David Kwiatkowski, a former lab technician at Exeter, N.H., Hospital. Kwiatkowski, accused

    Posted: 12/3/2012 2:48:22 PM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in New Hampshire shows David Kwiatkowski, a former lab technician at Exeter, N.H., Hospital. Kwiatkowski, accused of stealing drugs and infecting patients with hepatitis C through contaminated syringes, is scheduled for arraignment in federal court in Concord, N.H., Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's Office, File)
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              In this photo taken Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012 a newly mechanized pharmaceutical machine that helps pharmacists dispense medicine is loaded with ARV medication, at the US sponsored Themba

    In this photo taken Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012 a newly mechanized pharmaceutical machine that helps pharmacists dispense medicine is loaded with ARV medication, at the US sponsored Themba

    Posted: 12/1/2012 7:03:36 AM EST
    In this photo taken Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012 a newly mechanized pharmaceutical machine that helps pharmacists dispense medicine is loaded with ARV medication, at the US sponsored Themba Lethu, HIV/AIDS Clinic, at the Helen Joseph hospital, in Johannesburg. In the early 90s when South Africa’s Themba Lethu clinic could only treat HIV/AIDS patients for opportunistic diseases, many would come in on wheelchairs and keep coming to the health center until they died. Two decades later the clinic is the biggest ARV (anti-retroviral) treatment center in the country and sees between 600 to 800 patients a day from all over southern Africa. Those who are brought in on wheelchairs, sometimes on the brink of death, get the crucial drugs and often become healthy and are walking within weeks. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)