Drugs Photos on Townhall

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              In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Jesse Pedro Resau, a friend of U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, stands at a viewpoint in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mu

    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Jesse Pedro Resau, a friend of U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, stands at a viewpoint in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mu

    Posted: 9/6/2012 3:03:23 PM EST
    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Jesse Pedro Resau, a friend of U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, stands at a viewpoint in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Kelly Thomas, owner of the coffee shop and bookstore El Gato Negro, which was frequently visited by U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, works in her cafe ii

    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Kelly Thomas, owner of the coffee shop and bookstore El Gato Negro, which was frequently visited by U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, works in her cafe ii

    Posted: 9/6/2012 3:03:23 PM EST
    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Kelly Thomas, owner of the coffee shop and bookstore El Gato Negro, which was frequently visited by U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, works in her cafe iin San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal speaks during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American'

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal speaks during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American'

    Posted: 9/6/2012 3:03:23 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal speaks during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, left, attends his appeals hearing in handcuffs in Granada, Nicaragua.  As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, left, attends his appeals hearing in handcuffs in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year

    Posted: 9/6/2012 3:03:23 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, left, attends his appeals hearing in handcuffs in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, center in blue shirt, is escorted out of court after his appeal hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellat

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, center in blue shirt, is escorted out of court after his appeal hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellat

    Posted: 9/6/2012 3:03:23 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, center in blue shirt, is escorted out of court after his appeal hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, a prison guard records a video with a cell phone during an appeal hearing for U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal in Granada, Nicaragua.  As a three-judge ap

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, a prison guard records a video with a cell phone during an appeal hearing for U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge ap

    Posted: 9/6/2012 3:03:23 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, a prison guard records a video with a cell phone during an appeal hearing for U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, left, sits next to other detainees during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mu

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, left, sits next to other detainees during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mu

    Posted: 9/6/2012 3:03:23 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Sachary Puracal, left, sits next to other detainees during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this photo taken Friday, Aug 24 2012, members of the Nicaragua National Police form a cordon around a fleet of vans bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated fro

    In this photo taken Friday, Aug 24 2012, members of the Nicaragua National Police form a cordon around a fleet of vans bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated fro

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    In this photo taken Friday, Aug 24 2012, members of the Nicaragua National Police form a cordon around a fleet of vans bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated from a group of Mexican nationals posing as journalists, in Managua, Nicaragua. Nicaraguan police say the group was detained while attempting to drive the vans to Costa Rica, transporting millions of dollars, to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, a plain clothes Nicaraguan police officer stands between two vans bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated from a gro

    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, a plain clothes Nicaraguan police officer stands between two vans bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated from a gro

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, a plain clothes Nicaraguan police officer stands between two vans bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated from a group of Mexican nationals posing as journalists, in Managua, Nicaragua. Nicaraguan police say the group was detained while attempting to drive the vans to Costa Rica, transporting millions of dollars, to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, left, looks at the shoulder of a fellow detainee, both facing organized crime and money laundering charges, during a court hearing to face addit

    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, left, looks at the shoulder of a fellow detainee, both facing organized crime and money laundering charges, during a court hearing to face addit

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, left, looks at the shoulder of a fellow detainee, both facing organized crime and money laundering charges, during a court hearing to face additional indictments, in Managua, Nicaragua, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Costa Rican authorities say Alatorre is believed to be the leader of a group posing as Televisa journalists transporting millions of dollars to Costa Rica to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              A group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained are escorted by Nicaraguan police agents to a court hearing to face additional charges, in Managua, Nicaragua,

    A group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained are escorted by Nicaraguan police agents to a court hearing to face additional charges, in Managua, Nicaragua,

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    A group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained are escorted by Nicaraguan police agents to a court hearing to face additional charges, in Managua, Nicaragua, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Nicaraguan police say the group was detained while attempting to drive vans emblazoned with Televisa's news logo, to Costa Rica, transporting millions of dollars, to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, a Nicaraguan police officer stands next to a van bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated from a group of Mexican nat

    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, a Nicaraguan police officer stands next to a van bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated from a group of Mexican nat

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, a Nicaraguan police officer stands next to a van bearing the logo of Mexican news channel Televisa, confiscated from a group of Mexican nationals posing as journalists, in Managua, Nicaragua. Nicaraguan police say the group was detained while attempting to drive the vans to Costa Rica, transporting millions of dollars, to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              Nicaraguan police stand guard during a court hearing for a group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained, in Managua, Nicaragua, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Nicarag

    Nicaraguan police stand guard during a court hearing for a group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained, in Managua, Nicaragua, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Nicarag

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    Nicaraguan police stand guard during a court hearing for a group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained, in Managua, Nicaragua, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Nicaraguan police say the group was detained while attempting to drive vans emblazoned with Televisa's news logo, to Costa Rica, transporting millions of dollars, to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              A group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained are escorted by Nicaraguan police agents to a court hearing to face additional charges, in Managua, Nicaragua,

    A group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained are escorted by Nicaraguan police agents to a court hearing to face additional charges, in Managua, Nicaragua,

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    A group of Mexican nationals who were posing as journalists when detained are escorted by Nicaraguan police agents to a court hearing to face additional charges, in Managua, Nicaragua, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Nicaraguan police say the group was detained while attempting to drive vans emblazoned with Televisa's news logo, to Costa Rica, transporting millions of dollars, to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, center, surrounded by fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, attend a court hearing to face additional indic

    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, center, surrounded by fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, attend a court hearing to face additional indic

    Posted: 8/31/2012 1:43:30 PM EST
    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, center, surrounded by fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, attend a court hearing to face additional indictments, in Managua, Nicaragua, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Costa Rican authorities say Alatorre is believed to be the leader of a group posing as Televisa journalists transporting millions of dollars to Costa Rica to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              FILE - In this July 24, 1999 file photo, overall leader Lance Armstrong of the U.S. strains on his way to winning the 19th stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a 57-kilometer indiv

    FILE - In this July 24, 1999 file photo, overall leader Lance Armstrong of the U.S. strains on his way to winning the 19th stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a 57-kilometer indiv

    Posted: 8/30/2012 7:33:31 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 24, 1999 file photo, overall leader Lance Armstrong of the U.S. strains on his way to winning the 19th stage of the Tour de France cycling race, a 57-kilometer individual time trial around the Futuroscope theme park near Poitiers, western France. Tyler Hamilton makes allegations in his book, "The Secret Race. Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France, Doping, Cover-ups and Winning at All Costs," that Armstrong gave him an illegal blood booster at his house before the 1999 Tour de France and the two teammates compared notes on using performance-enhancing drugs as far back as 1998. The book is set to be published Sept. 5. The Associated Press purchased a copy Thursday. AP Photo/Laurent Rebours, File)
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              FILE - In this June 26, 2001, file photo, Tyler Hamilton fights his way up the hill during the 8th stage of the Tour de Suisse, the mountain time trial from Sion to Crans-Montana in Cra

    FILE - In this June 26, 2001, file photo, Tyler Hamilton fights his way up the hill during the 8th stage of the Tour de Suisse, the mountain time trial from Sion to Crans-Montana in Cra

    Posted: 8/30/2012 7:33:29 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 26, 2001, file photo, Tyler Hamilton fights his way up the hill during the 8th stage of the Tour de Suisse, the mountain time trial from Sion to Crans-Montana in Crans-Montana, Switzerland. Hamilton makes allegations in his book, "The Secret Race. Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France, Doping, Cover-ups and Winning at All Costs," that Lance Armstrong gave him an illegal blood booster at his house before the 1999 Tour de France and the two teammates compared notes on using performance-enhancing drugs as far back as 1998. The book is set to be published Sept. 5. The Associated Press purchased a copy Thursday. (AP Photo/Keystone Alessandro della Valle, File)
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              This Aug. 28, 2012 photo provided by the Baltimore County Police Department shows Andrew Piper of Baltimore. Piper is the stepfather of Robert Wayne Gladden, Jr,  who was charged as an

    This Aug. 28, 2012 photo provided by the Baltimore County Police Department shows Andrew Piper of Baltimore. Piper is the stepfather of Robert Wayne Gladden, Jr, who was charged as an

    Posted: 8/28/2012 5:13:42 PM EST
    This Aug. 28, 2012 photo provided by the Baltimore County Police Department shows Andrew Piper of Baltimore. Piper is the stepfather of Robert Wayne Gladden, Jr, who was charged as an adult with attempted first degree murder and first degree assault in the shooting of a classmate on the first day of school at a Baltimore high school. Piper was arrested on charges unrelated to the shooting. He was charged with illegal possession of weapons and drugs at his home. (AP Photo/ Baltimore County Police Department)
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              A cyclist rides along the Lance Armstrong Bikeway, Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, in Austin, Texas. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong's seven Tour de France titles Friday, erasing

    A cyclist rides along the Lance Armstrong Bikeway, Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, in Austin, Texas. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong's seven Tour de France titles Friday, erasing

    Posted: 8/24/2012 6:23:34 PM EST
    A cyclist rides along the Lance Armstrong Bikeway, Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, in Austin, Texas. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong's seven Tour de France titles Friday, erasing one of the most incredible achievements in sports after deciding he had used performance-enhancing drugs to do it. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
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              A cyclist passes a mural on the Lance Armstrong foundation building, Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, in Austin, Texas. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour de France

    A cyclist passes a mural on the Lance Armstrong foundation building, Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, in Austin, Texas. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour de France

    Posted: 8/24/2012 1:43:22 PM EST
    A cyclist passes a mural on the Lance Armstrong foundation building, Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, in Austin, Texas. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles Friday, erasing one of the most incredible achievements in sports after deciding he had used performance-enhancing drugs to do it. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)