Drugs Photos on Townhall

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              Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling are displayed on shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012.  British bookshops are opening their doors early

    Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling are displayed on shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British bookshops are opening their doors early

    Posted: 9/27/2012 6:13:28 AM EST
    Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling are displayed on shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British bookshops are opening their doors early as Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling launches her long anticipated first book for adults. Publishers have tried to keep details of the book under wraps ahead of its launch Thursday, but "The Casual Vacancy" has gotten early buzz about references to sex and drugs that might be a tad mature for the youngest "Potter" fans. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
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              Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling rest on a chair behind the sales counter to go on the shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012.  British boo

    Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling rest on a chair behind the sales counter to go on the shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British boo

    Posted: 9/27/2012 6:13:28 AM EST
    Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling rest on a chair behind the sales counter to go on the shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British bookshops are opening their doors early as Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling launches her long anticipated first book for adults. Publishers have tried to keep details of the book under wraps ahead of its launch Thursday, but "The Casual Vacancy" has gotten early buzz about references to sex and drugs that might be a tad mature for the youngest "Potter" fans. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
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              Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling stand on a trolley ready to go on the shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012.  British bookshops are openi

    Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling stand on a trolley ready to go on the shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British bookshops are openi

    Posted: 9/27/2012 6:13:28 AM EST
    Copies of the "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling stand on a trolley ready to go on the shelves at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British bookshops are opening their doors early as Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling launches her long anticipated first book for adults. Publishers have tried to keep details of the book under wraps ahead of its launch Thursday, but "The Casual Vacancy" has gotten early buzz about references to sex and drugs that might be a tad mature for the youngest "Potter" fans. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
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              An employee adjusts copies of  "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012.  British bookshops are opening their doors early as Harry

    An employee adjusts copies of "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British bookshops are opening their doors early as Harry

    Posted: 9/27/2012 6:13:28 AM EST
    An employee adjusts copies of "The Casual Vacancy" by author J.K. Rowling at a book store in London, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. British bookshops are opening their doors early as Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling launches her long anticipated first book for adults. Publishers have tried to keep details of the book under wraps ahead of its launch Thursday, but "The Casual Vacancy" has gotten early buzz about references to sex and drugs that might be a tad mature for the youngest "Potter" fans. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
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              This 2008 picture provided by Georgetown University shows Richard Schlegel, M.D., Ph.D., left, and research associate Aleksandra Dakic, Ph.D., in his laboratory at Georgetown University

    This 2008 picture provided by Georgetown University shows Richard Schlegel, M.D., Ph.D., left, and research associate Aleksandra Dakic, Ph.D., in his laboratory at Georgetown University

    Posted: 9/26/2012 5:28:36 PM EST
    This 2008 picture provided by Georgetown University shows Richard Schlegel, M.D., Ph.D., left, and research associate Aleksandra Dakic, Ph.D., in his laboratory at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington. A discovery allows doctors to grow "mini tumors" from each patient's cancer in a lab dish, then test various drugs or combinations on them to see which works best. Although the approach needs much more testing, researchers think it could offer a cheap, simple way to personalize treatment without having to analyze each patient's genes. "We see a lot of potential for it," said Schlegel, one of the study leaders. "Almost everyone could do it easily." (AP Photo/Georgetown University)
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              Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, left, and fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, are escorted to a court hearing, in Managua, Nicaragua, Tue

    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, left, and fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, are escorted to a court hearing, in Managua, Nicaragua, Tue

    Posted: 9/18/2012 4:33:38 PM EST
    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, left, and fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, are escorted to a court hearing, in Managua, Nicaragua, Tuesday, Sept 18, 2012. Costa Rican authorities say Alatorre is believed to be the leader of a group posing as Televisa journalists transporting millions of dollars to Costa Rica to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, who is facing organized crime and money laundering charges, is filmed by a TV reporter during a court hearing, in Managua, Nicaragua, Tuesday, S

    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, who is facing organized crime and money laundering charges, is filmed by a TV reporter during a court hearing, in Managua, Nicaragua, Tuesday, S

    Posted: 9/18/2012 4:33:38 PM EST
    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, who is facing organized crime and money laundering charges, is filmed by a TV reporter during a court hearing, in Managua, Nicaragua, Tuesday, Sept 18, 2012. Costa Rican authorities say Alatorre is believed to be the leader of a group posing as Televisa journalists transporting millions of dollars to Costa Rica to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, second left, and fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, are escorted to a court hearing, in Managua, Nicarag

    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, second left, and fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, are escorted to a court hearing, in Managua, Nicarag

    Posted: 9/18/2012 4:33:38 PM EST
    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, second left, and fellow detainees, all facing organized crime and money laundering charges, are escorted to a court hearing, in Managua, Nicaragua, Tuesday, Sept 18, 2012. Costa Rican authorities say Alatorre is believed to be the leader of a group posing as Televisa journalists transporting millions of dollars to Costa Rica to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, who is facing organized crime and money laundering charges, is seen between National Police officers, during a court hearing  in Managua, Nicara

    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, who is facing organized crime and money laundering charges, is seen between National Police officers, during a court hearing in Managua, Nicara

    Posted: 9/18/2012 4:33:38 PM EST
    Mexican national Raquel Alatorre Correa, who is facing organized crime and money laundering charges, is seen between National Police officers, during a court hearing in Managua, Nicaragua, Tuesday, Sept 18, 2012. Costa Rican authorities say Alatorre is believed to be the leader of a group posing as Televisa journalists transporting millions of dollars to Costa Rica to pay for a load of drugs that had been smuggled into the United States. The Aug. 20 seizure has pulled back the curtain on Nicaragua’s role as a conduit between South American cocaine producers and the Mexican drug cartels that move their product into the United States. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as she is treated with R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drug

    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as she is treated with R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drug

    Posted: 9/17/2012 8:18:26 AM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as she is treated with R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drugs used in chemotherapy to treat her aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Miami. Human medical specialists are treading new ground in applying a standard chemotherapy regimen to treat cancer in an orangutan. Orangutans share about 96 percent of a human’s genetic makeup, and Peanut’s treatment plan is closer to that of what a human would receive for the same type of cancer, making this the first documented case of an orangutan being treated with this type of therapy. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as she is treated with R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drug

    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as she is treated with R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drug

    Posted: 9/17/2012 4:53:24 AM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as she is treated with R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drugs used in chemotherapy to treat her aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Miami. Human medical specialists are treading new ground in applying a standard chemotherapy regimen to treat cancer in an orangutan. Orangutans share about 96 percent of a human’s genetic makeup, and Peanut’s treatment plan is closer to that of what a human would receive for the same type of cancer, making this the first documented case of an orangutan being treated with this type of therapy (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, an IV line is stuck in Peanut's arm as she undergoes R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drugs used in chemotherapy to treat her aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphom

    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, an IV line is stuck in Peanut's arm as she undergoes R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drugs used in chemotherapy to treat her aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphom

    Posted: 9/17/2012 4:53:24 AM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, an IV line is stuck in Peanut's arm as she undergoes R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drugs used in chemotherapy to treat her aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Miami. Human medical specialists are treading new ground in applying a standard chemotherapy regimen to treat cancer in an orangutan. Orangutans share about 96 percent of a human’s genetic makeup, and Peanut’s treatment plan is closer to that of what a human would receive for the same type of cancer, making this the first documented case of an orangutan being treated with this type of therapy. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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              In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as a group of medical professionals gather over the medical

    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as a group of medical professionals gather over the medical

    Posted: 9/17/2012 4:53:23 AM EST
    In this Sept. 5, 2012 photo, Jungle Island volunteer Linda Jacobs comforts Peanut, one of the orangutans from a private zoo, as a group of medical professionals gather over the medical table for R-CHOP therapy, a combination of drugs used in chemotherapy to treat her aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Miami. Human medical specialists are treading new ground in applying a standard chemotherapy regimen to treat cancer in an orangutan. Orangutans share about 96 percent of a human’s genetic makeup, and Peanut’s treatment plan is closer to that of what a human would receive for the same type of cancer, making this the first documented case of an orangutan being treated with this type of therapy (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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              In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Jesse Pedro Resau, a friend of U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, stands at a viewpoint in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the

    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Jesse Pedro Resau, a friend of U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, stands at a viewpoint in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the

    Posted: 9/6/2012 5:33:33 PM EST
    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Jesse Pedro Resau, a friend of U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, stands at a viewpoint in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Kelly Thomas, owner of the coffee shop and bookstore El Gato Negro, which was frequently visited by U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, works in her cafe iin San Ju

    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Kelly Thomas, owner of the coffee shop and bookstore El Gato Negro, which was frequently visited by U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, works in her cafe iin San Ju

    Posted: 9/6/2012 5:33:33 PM EST
    In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Kelly Thomas, owner of the coffee shop and bookstore El Gato Negro, which was frequently visited by U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, works in her cafe iin San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal speaks during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate,

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal speaks during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate,

    Posted: 9/6/2012 5:33:33 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal speaks during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, center in blue shirt, is escorted out of court after his appeal hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, center in blue shirt, is escorted out of court after his appeal hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel

    Posted: 9/6/2012 5:33:33 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, center in blue shirt, is escorted out of court after his appeal hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, a prison guard records a video with a cell phone during an appeal hearing for U.S. citizen Jason Puracal in Granada, Nicaragua.  As a three-judge appellate

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, a prison guard records a video with a cell phone during an appeal hearing for U.S. citizen Jason Puracal in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate

    Posted: 9/6/2012 5:33:33 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, a prison guard records a video with a cell phone during an appeal hearing for U.S. citizen Jason Puracal in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, left, sits next to other detainees during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, left, sits next to other detainees during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the

    Posted: 9/6/2012 5:33:33 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S. citizen Jason Puracal, left, sits next to other detainees during his appeals hearing in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
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              In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S citizen Jason Puracal, left, attends his appeals hearing in handcuffs in Granada, Nicaragua.  As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old Ame

    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S citizen Jason Puracal, left, attends his appeals hearing in handcuffs in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old Ame

    Posted: 9/6/2012 5:33:33 PM EST
    In this Aug. 20, 2012 photo, U.S citizen Jason Puracal, left, attends his appeals hearing in handcuffs in Granada, Nicaragua. As a three-judge appellate panel mulls the 35-year-old American's fate, the case has drawn the scrutiny of U.S. lawmakers and human-rights advocates, including the California Innocence Project, which works to absolve people who have been wrongfully convicted. In late 2010 masked policemen raided his seafront real estate office and took him to Nicaragua's maximum security prison. Prosecutors charged that Puracal was using his business as a front for money laundering in a region used to transport cocaine from Colombia to the United States. Because no drugs or cash were seized, Puracal's family and friends thought he wouldn't be held long, but nine months later, a judge convicted Puracal and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)