Drug War Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:51 AM EST
    FILE - In this April 8, 2009 file photo, graves to be used for future burials are lined up in San Rafael cemetery in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:51 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 3, 2007 file photo, wearing a military cap and jacket, Mexico's President Felipe Calderon, left, walks with his Secretary of Defense Guillermo Galvan as they arrive at a military base in Apatzingan, Mexico to announce stepped-up military actions against drug cartels. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:51 AM EST
    EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - In this May 16, 2011 file photo, the hand of a corpse hangs from a bed with a syringe that is being used by forensic experts at a makeshift morgue inside a refrigerated container as they try to identify hundreds of bodies found in mass clandestine graves in Durango, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:51 AM EST
    FILE - In this Jan. 3, 2007 file photo, wearing a military cap and jacket, Mexico's President Felipe Calderon, foreground, walks with his Secretary of Defense Guillermo Galvan as they arrive at a military base in Apatzingan, Mexico to announce stepped-up military actions against drug cartels. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:50 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 23, 2011 file photo, Mexico's President Felipe Calderon, right, comforts Maria Elena Herrera Magdalena, whose four children are missing, during a meeting with victims of violence in Mexico City. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:50 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 15, 2011 file photo, soldiers burn marijuana plants at the largest marijuana plantation ever discovered in Mexico, near San Quintin, Baja California state, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the United States while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:50 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2010 file photo, federal police escort Texas-born fugitive Edgar Valdez Villarreal, alias "the Barbie," during his presentation to the media in Mexico City. Valdez is wanted in the United States for allegedly smuggling tons of cocaine. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:50 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2010 file photo, soldiers prepare to incinerate 134 tons of U.S.-bound marijuana seized in several trucks, by far the biggest drug bust in the country in recent years in Tijuana, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, About 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:49 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2008 file photo, bodies from a total of 13 bullet-ridden men, with their hands tied behind their backs, lie in a field near the town of San Ignacio in the pacific state of Sinaloa, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:49 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 15, 2010 file photo, a police officer runs after a car bomb attack on police patrol trucks that killed two officers in the border city of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:49 AM EST
    EDS. NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2011 file photo, the bodies of two men shot dead next to the Caleta beach, lie, one of them covered, in the Pacific resort city of Acapulco, Mexico. The city of Acapulco has been hit by violence as drug gangs continue to battle for control of the region. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, About 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Bernandino Hernandez, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:49 AM EST
    EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2011 file photo, a man claiming to be a relative grieves over the body of a man that was hanging from a pedestrian bridge in the drug violence-plagued city of Acapulco, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Bernandino Hernandez, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2008 file photo, soldiers carry coffins during the funeral of six members of Mexico's Army that were found decapitated in Chilpancingo, Mexico, the most gruesome attack yet against the Mexican army in its battle against drug gangs. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Claudio Cruz, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 15, 2009 file photo, soldiers stand in line as they prepare to board vehicles at the Military School in Mexico City to be deployed to the northern part of Mexico to participate in drug crop eradication duties and to learn first-hand Mexico's ongoing war against the drug cartels. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills, File)
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    Posted: 12/11/2011 12:05:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2010 file photo, friends and relatives of Sotero Reyes Ricario, one of the 14 victims of a shootout on two private homes during a teenage birthday party, mourn over his coffin at a funeral service in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his assault on organized crime, about 45,000 troops have been deployed, plus several thousand more from the Navy infantry, or marines. More than 45,000 people have been killed by several counts, though the government stopped giving figures on drug war dead when they hit nearly 35,000 a year ago. Still, the flow of drugs continues unabated into the U.S. while arms and money flow into Mexico.(AP Photo/Raymundo Ruiz, File)
  •  - A Mexican police officer prays in front of an image of the Virgin of Guadalupe at a church in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    A Mexican police officer prays in front of an image of the Virgin of Guadalupe at a church in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Posted: 12/9/2011 10:33:42 PM EST
    A Mexican police officer prays in front of an image of the Virgin of Guadalupe at a church in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state December 8, 2011. Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched the barracks, where 600 soldiers from Mexico's army will be stationed. The Mexican drug war sparked a town exodus and most of the residents fled the city in 2010, pushing local authorities to demand for more troops in the area, according to local media. Picture taken December 8, 2011. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril (MEXICO - Tags: RELIGION DRUGS SOCIETY)
  •  - Soldiers stand in formation during the inauguration of military barracks in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Soldiers stand in formation during the inauguration of military barracks in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Posted: 12/9/2011 10:33:37 PM EST
    Soldiers stand in formation during the inauguration of military barracks in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state December 8, 2011. Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched the barracks, where 600 soldiers from Mexico's army will be stationed. The Mexican drug war sparked a town exodus and most of the residents fled the city in 2010, pushing local authorities to demand for more troops in the area, according to local media. Picture taken December 8, 2011. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril (MEXICO - Tags: MILITARY DRUGS SOCIETY)
  •  - A woman reaches out to shake hands with a soldier in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    A woman reaches out to shake hands with a soldier in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Posted: 12/9/2011 10:33:32 PM EST
    A woman reaches out to shake hands with a soldier in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state December 8, 2011. Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched the barracks, where 600 soldiers from Mexico's army will be stationed. The Mexican drug war sparked a town exodus and most of the residents fled the city in 2010, pushing local authorities to demand for more troops in the area, according to local media. Picture taken December 8, 2011. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril (MEXICO - Tags: MILITARY DRUGS SOCIETY)
  •  - Soldiers stand guard in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Soldiers stand guard in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Posted: 12/9/2011 10:33:26 PM EST
    Soldiers stand guard in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state December 8, 2011. Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched the barracks, where 600 soldiers from Mexico's army will be stationed. The Mexican drug war sparked a town exodus and most of the residents fled the city in 2010, pushing local authorities to demand for more troops in the area, according to local media. Picture taken December 8, 2011. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril (MEXICO - Tags: MILITARY DRUGS SOCIETY)
  •  - Soldiers stand guard in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Soldiers stand guard in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state

    Posted: 12/9/2011 10:33:22 PM EST
    Soldiers stand guard in Ciudad Mier in Tamaulipas state December 8, 2011. Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched the barracks, where 600 soldiers from Mexico's army will be stationed. The Mexican drug war sparked a town exodus and most of the residents fled the city in 2010, pushing local authorities to demand for more troops in the area, according to local media. Picture taken December 8, 2011. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril (MEXICO - Tags: MILITARY DRUGS SOCIETY)