Drug War Photos on Townhall

  •  - To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY

    To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY

    Posted: 6/1/2011 10:08:06 AM EST
    The letter "Z" is seen painted on a hill next to the toll booth at the freeway between Monterrey and Torreon, in the Mexican state of Coahuila March 13, 2010. The "Z" refers to the Zetas drug cartel. In just four years, Monterrey, a manufacturing city of 4 million people 140 miles (230 km) from the Texan border, has gone from being a model for developing economies to a symbol of Mexico's drug war chaos, sucked down into a dark spiral of gangland killings, violent crime and growing lawlessness. By engulfing Monterrey, home to some of Latin America's biggest companies and where annual income per capita is double the Mexican average at $17,000, the violence shows just how serious the security crisis has become in Mexico, the world's seventh-largest oil exporter and a major U.S. trade partner. Picture taken March 13, 2011. To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY

    To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY

    Posted: 6/1/2011 10:07:37 AM EST
    A military helicopter flies over Monterrey July 18, 2010. In just four years, Monterrey, a manufacturing city of 4 million people 140 miles (230 km) from the Texan border, has gone from being a model for developing economies to a symbol of Mexico's drug war chaos, sucked down into a dark spiral of gangland killings, violent crime and growing lawlessness. By engulfing Monterrey, home to some of Latin America's biggest companies and where annual income per capita is double the Mexican average at $17,000, the violence shows just how serious the security crisis has become in Mexico, the world's seventh-largest oil exporter and a major U.S. trade partner. Picture taken July 18, 2011. To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY CRIME LAW)
  •  - To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY

    To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY

    Posted: 6/1/2011 10:03:27 AM EST
    The letter "Z" is seen painted on a hill next to the toll booth at the freeway between Monterrey and Torreon, in the Mexican state of Coahuila March 13, 2010. The "Z" refers to the Zetas drug cartel. In just four years, Monterrey, a manufacturing city of 4 million people 140 miles (230 km) from the Texan border, has gone from being a model for developing economies to a symbol of Mexico's drug war chaos, sucked down into a dark spiral of gangland killings, violent crime and growing lawlessness. By engulfing Monterrey, home to some of Latin America's biggest companies and where annual income per capita is double the Mexican average at $17,000, the violence shows just how serious the security crisis has become in Mexico, the world's seventh-largest oil exporter and a major U.S. trade partner. Picture taken March 13, 2011. To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUGS/MONTERREY REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)
  •  - Troops take part in an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name Heroic City of Juarez

    Troops take part in an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name Heroic City of Juarez

    Posted: 5/21/2011 5:41:43 PM EST
    Troops take part in an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS MILITARY)
  •  - Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte look on in Mexico

    Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte look on in Mexico

    Posted: 5/21/2011 4:59:47 PM EST
    Mexican President Felipe Calderon (2nd L) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) look on as a soldier is seen a military vehicle during an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's newly named Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS)
  •  - Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte look in Mexico

    Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte look in Mexico

    Posted: 5/21/2011 4:52:00 PM EST
    Mexican President Felipe Calderon (C), Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake (R) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) look on as a soldier rides in a military vehicle during an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's newly named Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS)
  •  - Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte look on in Mexico

    Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte look on in Mexico

    Posted: 5/21/2011 4:50:36 PM EST
    Mexican President Felipe Calderon (2nd L), Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake (3th L) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) look on as troops take part during an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's newly named Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS)
  •  - Mexican President Calderon makes "V" for victory next to Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake (R) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) during an event where state and city leaders

    Mexican President Calderon makes "V" for victory next to Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake (R) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) during an event where state and city leaders

    Posted: 5/21/2011 4:48:26 PM EST
    Mexican President Felipe Calderon (C) gestures a "V" for victory sign next to Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake (R) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) during an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's newly named Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS)
  •  - Mexican President Felipe Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte attend an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name

    Mexican President Felipe Calderon, Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte attend an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name

    Posted: 5/21/2011 4:46:59 PM EST
    Mexican President Felipe Calderon (C), Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake (R) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) attend an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's newly named Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS)
  •  - Mexican President Felipe Calderon looks on as troops march during an event to celebrate the city's new name Heroic City of Juarez

    Mexican President Felipe Calderon looks on as troops march during an event to celebrate the city's new name Heroic City of Juarez

    Posted: 5/21/2011 4:45:19 PM EST
    Mexican President Felipe Calderon (C top) looks on as troops march during an event to celebrate the city's new name, Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - A soldier woman carries a Mexican flag as Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's IM Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte attend an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name

    A soldier woman carries a Mexican flag as Mexican President Calderon, Mexico's IM Blake and Chihuahua state governor Duarte attend an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name

    Posted: 5/21/2011 4:24:39 PM EST
    A soldier woman carries a Mexican flag as Mexican President Felipe Calderon (C), Mexico's Interior Minister Francisco Blake (R) and Chihuahua state governor Cesar Duarte (L) attend an event where state and city leaders celebrate the city's new name Heroic City of Juarez May 21, 2011. Mexico's most violent city, Ciudad Juarez, where more than 9,000 people have died in a horrifying drug war since 2008, is renaming itself Heroica Ciudad Juarez, or Heroic City of Juarez, as part of three weeks of festivities to mark the decisive battle on May 8, 1911 when rebels defeated troops loyal to strongman Porfirio Diaz. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS MILITARY)
  •  - A woman shouts slogans in a march in Mexico City against Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drug cartels

    A woman shouts slogans in a march in Mexico City against Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drug cartels

    Posted: 4/7/2011 1:44:28 AM EST
    A woman shouts slogans during a march in Mexico City April 6, 2011. The protest was called out by poet Javier Sicilia, whose son was discovered killed in Cuernavaca last month. Police there found the bodies of 24-year-old Juan Francisco Sicilia and several of his friends in a car, along with a menacing message from drug cartels. Thousands of Mexicans protested the country's raging drug war on Wednesday as dozens of bodies were found in graves near the country's border with the United States. Demonstrators marched in cities across Mexico, holding signs condemning the wave of killing that has claimed more than 37,000 lives since President Felipe Calderon took office in December 2006 and launched a military-led crackdown against drug cartels. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
  •  - People wear signs showing what they say is the number of people killed in drug-related incidents in the year 2010 and 2011, during a protest in Guadalajara

    People wear signs showing what they say is the number of people killed in drug-related incidents in the year 2010 and 2011, during a protest in Guadalajara

    Posted: 4/7/2011 1:34:05 AM EST
    People wear signs showing what they say is the number of people killed in drug-related incidents in the year 2010 and 2011, during a protest in Guadalajara April 6, 2011. Thousands of Mexicans protested the country's raging drug war on Wednesday as dozens of bodies were found in graves near the country's border with the United States. Demonstrators marched in cities across Mexico, holding signs condemning the wave of killing that has claimed more than 37,000 lives since President Felipe Calderon took office in December 2006 and launched a military-led crackdown against drug cartels. REUTERS/Alejandro Acosta (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
  •  - People participate in a march in Cuernavaca against Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drug cartels

    People participate in a march in Cuernavaca against Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drug cartels

    Posted: 4/7/2011 1:31:25 AM EST
    Thousands of people participate in a march in Cuernavaca April 6, 2011. The protest was called out by poet Javier Sicilia, whose son was discovered killed in Cuernavaca last month. Police there found the bodies of 24-year-old Juan Francisco Sicilia and several of his friends in a car, along with a menacing message from drug cartels. Thousands of Mexicans protested the country's raging drug war on Wednesday as dozens of bodies were found in graves near the country's border with the United States. Demonstrators marched in cities across Mexico, holding signs condemning the wave of killing that has claimed more than 37,000 lives since President Felipe Calderon took office in December 2006 and launched a military-led crackdown against drug cartels. REUTERS/Margarito Perez (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - People protest against the drug war in Cancun

    People protest against the drug war in Cancun

    Posted: 4/7/2011 1:15:13 AM EST
    A woman holds a sign reading "Calderon, stop your little murderous war, better get out," during a protest in Cancun called out by poet Javier Sicilia after the death of his son whose body was found along with six other dead people inside a car a week ago in Cuernavaca, April 6, 2011. after the death of his son whose body was found along with six other dead people inside a car a week ago in Cuernavaca, April 6, 2011. Nationwide protests against Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drug cartels that has claimed more than 37,000 lives since late 2006 were planned all over Mexico and cities as far afield as Buenos Aires, Paris, New York and Barcelona. REUTERS/Gerardo Garcia (MEXICO - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY)
  •  - A woman lights candles on Zocalo Square after a march against the drug war in Mexico City

    A woman lights candles on Zocalo Square after a march against the drug war in Mexico City

    Posted: 4/7/2011 12:33:23 AM EST
    A woman lights candles on Zocalo Square after a march in Mexico City called out by poet Javier Sicilia after the death of his son whose body was found along with six other dead people inside a car a week ago in Cuernavaca, April 6, 2011. Nationwide protests against Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drug cartels that has claimed more than 37,000 lives since late 2006 were planned all over Mexico and cities as far afield as Buenos Aires, Paris, New York and Barcelona. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso (MEXICO - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY)
  •  - A woman holds a human-size cardboard figure with the story of a victim of the drug war written on it during a protest in Guadalajara

    A woman holds a human-size cardboard figure with the story of a victim of the drug war written on it during a protest in Guadalajara

    Posted: 4/7/2011 12:25:14 AM EST
    A woman holds a human-size cardboard figure with the story of a victim of the drug war written on it during a protest in Guadalajara, April 6, 2011. Nationwide protests against Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war on drug cartels that has claimed more than 37,000 lives since late 2006 were planned all over Mexico and cities as far afield as Buenos Aires, Paris, New York and Barcelona. REUTERS/Alejandro Acosta (MEXICO - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY)
  •  - A person walks past a glass door damaged by bullets at the police headquarters where Marisol Valles Garcia used to work in Praxedis G. Guerrero

    A person walks past a glass door damaged by bullets at the police headquarters where Marisol Valles Garcia used to work in Praxedis G. Guerrero

    Posted: 3/7/2011 2:57:19 PM EST
    A person walks past a glass door damaged by bullets at the police headquarters where Marisol Valles Garcia used to work as the police chief, in Praxedis G. Guerrero March 7, 2011. The 20-year-old female student who became the police chief in one of Mexico's most dangerous drug war towns was fired by the mayor on Monday for not showing up to work after Mexican media reported she received death threats. Marisol Valles, a criminology student in Mexico's violent city of Ciudad Juarez, took charge of the police force in the neighboring municipality of Praxedis G. Guerrero near El Paso, Texas in October, sparking intense media attention after few candidates dared to apply for the dangerous job. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
  •  - A soldier walks past the police headquarters where Marisol Valles Garcia used to work as the police chief in Praxedis G. Guerrero

    A soldier walks past the police headquarters where Marisol Valles Garcia used to work as the police chief in Praxedis G. Guerrero

    Posted: 3/7/2011 2:34:07 PM EST
    A soldier walks past the police headquarters where Marisol Valles Garcia used to work as the police chief in Praxedis G. Guerrero March 7, 2011. The 20-year-old female student who became the police chief in one of Mexico's most dangerous drug war towns was fired by the mayor on Monday for not showing up to work after Mexican media reported she received death threats. Marisol Valles, a criminology student in Mexico's violent city of Ciudad Juarez, took charge of the police force in the neighboring municipality of Praxedis G. Guerrero near El Paso, Texas in October, sparking intense media attention after few candidates dared to apply for the dangerous job. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
  •  - File photo of Marisol Valles Garcia talking to a colleague in Praxedis G. Guerrero

    File photo of Marisol Valles Garcia talking to a colleague in Praxedis G. Guerrero

    Posted: 3/7/2011 2:31:11 PM EST
    Marisol Valles Garcia talks to a colleague in Praxedis G. Guerrero in this October 29, 2010 file photo. The 20-year-old female student who became the police chief in one of Mexico's most dangerous drug war towns was fired by the mayor on March 7, 2010 for not showing up to work after Mexican media reported she received death threats. Marisol Valles, a criminology student in Mexico's violent city of Ciudad Juarez, took charge of the police force in the neighboring municipality of Praxedis G. Guerrero near El Paso, Texas in October, sparking intense media attention after few candidates dared to apply for the dangerous job. REUTERS/Gael Gonzalez/Files (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW SOCIETY)


TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP