Doctors Photos on Townhall

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              Logan Stevenson's stuffed toy, Bun Bun, rests on a table with his suit jacket after his parent's wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa.  Christine Stevenson and Se

    Logan Stevenson's stuffed toy, Bun Bun, rests on a table with his suit jacket after his parent's wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Christine Stevenson and Se

    Posted: 8/3/2013 7:01:17 PM EST
    Logan Stevenson's stuffed toy, Bun Bun, rests on a table with his suit jacket after his parent's wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Christine Stevenson and Sean Stevenson's son, Logan Stevenson, 2, stood with his grandmother, Debbie Stevenson, during a 12-minute ceremony uniting Logan's mother and his father. The boy has leukemia and other complications. The Stevensons abandoned an original wedding date of July 2014 after learning from doctors late last month that their son had two to three weeks to live. The couple wanted Logan to see them marry and to be part of family photos. Logan, who was born Oct. 22, 2010, was diagnosed shortly after his first birthday with acute myeloid leukemia. He has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often leads to cancer. (AP Photo/Tribune Review, Eric Schmadel) PITTSBURGH OUT
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              Detail from a wedding cake donated by Leslie Joseph of Hunker shows a representation of Logan Stevenson, 2, and his favorite stuffed animal at the Stevenson wedding ceremony on Saturday

    Detail from a wedding cake donated by Leslie Joseph of Hunker shows a representation of Logan Stevenson, 2, and his favorite stuffed animal at the Stevenson wedding ceremony on Saturday

    Posted: 8/3/2013 7:01:17 PM EST
    Detail from a wedding cake donated by Leslie Joseph of Hunker shows a representation of Logan Stevenson, 2, and his favorite stuffed animal at the Stevenson wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Christine Stevenson and Sean Stevenson's son, Logan Stevenson, 2, stood with his grandmother, Debbie Stevenson, during a 12-minute ceremony uniting Logan's mother and his father. The boy has leukemia and other complications. The Stevensons abandoned an original wedding date of July 2014 after learning from doctors late last month that their son had two to three weeks to live. The couple wanted Logan to see them marry and to be part of family photos. Logan, who was born Oct. 22, 2010, was diagnosed shortly after his first birthday with acute myeloid leukemia. He has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often leads to cancer. (AP Photo/Tribune Review, Eric Schmadel) PITTSBURGH OUT
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              Newlywed Christine Stevenson and Sean Stevenson smile after sharing their first kiss at the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa.  Their son, Logan Stevenson, 2,

    Newlywed Christine Stevenson and Sean Stevenson smile after sharing their first kiss at the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Their son, Logan Stevenson, 2,

    Posted: 8/3/2013 7:01:17 PM EST
    Newlywed Christine Stevenson and Sean Stevenson smile after sharing their first kiss at the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Their son, Logan Stevenson, 2, stood with his grandmother, Debbie Stevenson, during a 12-minute ceremony uniting Logan's mother and his father. The boy has leukemia and other complications. The Stevensons abandoned an original wedding date of July 2014 after learning from doctors late last month that their son had two to three weeks to live. The couple wanted Logan to see them marry and to be part of family photos. Logan, who was born Oct. 22, 2010, was diagnosed shortly after his first birthday with acute myeloid leukemia. He has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often leads to cancer. (AP Photo/Tribune Review, Eric Schmadel) PITTSBURGH OUT
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              Newlywed Christine Stevenson kisses the hand of her son,  Logan Stevenson, 2, after marrying Sean Stevenson in a wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa.  Logan stoo

    Newlywed Christine Stevenson kisses the hand of her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, after marrying Sean Stevenson in a wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Logan stoo

    Posted: 8/3/2013 7:01:17 PM EST
    Newlywed Christine Stevenson kisses the hand of her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, after marrying Sean Stevenson in a wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Logan stood with his grandmother, Debbie Stevenson, during a 12-minute ceremony uniting Logan's mother and his father. The boy has leukemia and other complications. The Stevensons abandoned an original wedding date of July 2014 after learning from doctors late last month that their son had two to three weeks to live. The couple wanted Logan to see them marry and to be part of family photos. Logan, who was born Oct. 22, 2010, was diagnosed shortly after his first birthday with acute myeloid leukemia. He has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often leads to cancer. (AP Photo/Tribune Review, Eric Schmadel) PITTSBURGH OUT
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              Christine Swidorsky carries her son and the couple's best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson during the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 20

    Christine Swidorsky carries her son and the couple's best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson during the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 20

    Posted: 8/3/2013 7:01:17 PM EST
    Christine Swidorsky carries her son and the couple's best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson during the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Logan stood with his grandmother, Debbie Stevenson, during a 12-minute ceremony uniting Logan's mother and his father. The boy has leukemia and other complications. The Stevensons abandoned an original wedding date of July 2014 after learning from doctors late last month that their son had two to three weeks to live. The couple wanted Logan to see them marry and to be part of family photos. Logan, who was born Oct. 22, 2010, was diagnosed shortly after his first birthday with acute myeloid leukemia. He has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often leads to cancer. (AP Photo/Tribune Review, Eric Schmadel) PITTSBURGH OUT
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              Christine Swidorsky carries her son and the couple's best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson during the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 20

    Christine Swidorsky carries her son and the couple's best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson during the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 20

    Posted: 8/3/2013 7:01:17 PM EST
    Christine Swidorsky carries her son and the couple's best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson during the wedding ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Jeannette, Pa. Logan stood with his grandmother, Debbie Stevenson, during a 12-minute ceremony uniting Logan's mother and his father. The boy has leukemia and other complications. The Stevensons abandoned an original wedding date of July 2014 after learning from doctors late last month that their son had two to three weeks to live. The couple wanted Logan to see them marry and to be part of family photos. Logan, who was born Oct. 22, 2010, was diagnosed shortly after his first birthday with acute myeloid leukemia. He has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often leads to cancer. (AP Photo/Tribune Review, Eric Schmadel)
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              FILE - A Thursday, June 10, 2010 photo from files showing local health workers removing earth contaminated by lead from a family compound in the village of Dareta in Gusau, Nigeria. The

    FILE - A Thursday, June 10, 2010 photo from files showing local health workers removing earth contaminated by lead from a family compound in the village of Dareta in Gusau, Nigeria. The

    Posted: 8/3/2013 6:12:04 AM EST
    FILE - A Thursday, June 10, 2010 photo from files showing local health workers removing earth contaminated by lead from a family compound in the village of Dareta in Gusau, Nigeria. The Nigerian village that suffered one of the worst recorded incidents of lead poisoning is now habitable and doctors can start treating more than 1,000 contaminated children, a doctor and a scientist from two international agencies said Friday. For some, it already is too late to reverse serious neurological damage, said Dr. Michelle Chouinard, Nigeria country director for Doctors Without Borders, told The Associated Press on Friday, Aug. 2, 2013. Some children are blind, others paralyzed, many will struggle at school with learning disabilities, she said. Doctors Without Borders uncovered the scandal in 2010 but nothing was done until this year about the worst-affected village, Bagega, because the federal government did not provide a promised $3 million, the group said. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)
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              FILE - In this Wednesday, June 9, 2010 file photo, men walk amongst the graves of children killed by lead poisoining, in Yangalma village, in Gusau, Nigeria. The Nigerian village that s

    FILE - In this Wednesday, June 9, 2010 file photo, men walk amongst the graves of children killed by lead poisoining, in Yangalma village, in Gusau, Nigeria. The Nigerian village that s

    Posted: 8/3/2013 6:12:04 AM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, June 9, 2010 file photo, men walk amongst the graves of children killed by lead poisoining, in Yangalma village, in Gusau, Nigeria. The Nigerian village that suffered one of the worst recorded incidents of lead poisoning is now habitable and doctors can start treating more than 1,000 contaminated children, a doctor and a scientist from two international agencies said Friday. For some, it already is too late to reverse serious neurological damage, said Dr. Michelle Chouinard, Nigeria country director for Doctors Without Borders, told The Associated Press on Friday, Aug. 2, 2013. Some children are blind, others paralyzed, many will struggle at school with learning disabilities, she said. Doctors Without Borders uncovered the scandal in 2010 but nothing was done until this year about the worst-affected village, Bagega, because the federal government did not provide a promised $3 million, the group said. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)
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              FILE - A Thursday, June 10, 2010 photo from files showing local health workers removing earth contaminated by lead from a family compound in the village of Dareta in Gusau, Nigeria. The

    FILE - A Thursday, June 10, 2010 photo from files showing local health workers removing earth contaminated by lead from a family compound in the village of Dareta in Gusau, Nigeria. The

    Posted: 8/3/2013 6:12:04 AM EST
    FILE - A Thursday, June 10, 2010 photo from files showing local health workers removing earth contaminated by lead from a family compound in the village of Dareta in Gusau, Nigeria. The Nigerian village that suffered one of the worst recorded incidents of lead poisoning is now habitable and doctors can start treating more than 1,000 contaminated children, a doctor and a scientist from two international agencies said Friday. For some, it already is too late to reverse serious neurological damage, said Dr. Michelle Chouinard, Nigeria country director for Doctors Without Borders, told The Associated Press on Friday, Aug. 2, 2013. Some children are blind, others paralyzed, many will struggle at school with learning disabilities, she said. Doctors Without Borders uncovered the scandal in 2010 but nothing was done until this year about the worst-affected village, Bagega, because the federal government did not provide a promised $3 million, the group said. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)
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              Christine Swidorsky holds her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, with her husband-to-be and Logan's father Sean Stevenson, for a portrait on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 in their Jeannette, Pa., home.

    Christine Swidorsky holds her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, with her husband-to-be and Logan's father Sean Stevenson, for a portrait on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 in their Jeannette, Pa., home.

    Posted: 8/2/2013 12:34:08 AM EST
    Christine Swidorsky holds her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, with her husband-to-be and Logan's father Sean Stevenson, for a portrait on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 in their Jeannette, Pa., home. The Pennsylvania couple plans to have their dying toddler serve as the groom's best man when they wed on Saturday, Aug. 3. The couple had planned to wed next year, but decided to move the ceremony up to Saturday so the boy, who has leukemia and other complications, could participate. Logan has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often results in cancer. Doctors last week gave the boy two to three weeks to live. (AP Photo/Tribune-Review, Eric Schmadel)
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              Christine Swidorsky holds her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, with her husband-to-be and Logan's father Sean Stevenson, for a portrait on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 in their Jeannette, Pa., home.

    Christine Swidorsky holds her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, with her husband-to-be and Logan's father Sean Stevenson, for a portrait on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 in their Jeannette, Pa., home.

    Posted: 8/1/2013 11:52:06 AM EST
    Christine Swidorsky holds her son, Logan Stevenson, 2, with her husband-to-be and Logan's father Sean Stevenson, for a portrait on Tuesday, July 30, 2013 in their Jeannette, Pa., home. The Pennsylvania couple plans to have their dying toddler serve as the groom's best man when they wed on Saturday, Aug. 3. The couple had planned to wed next year, but decided to move the ceremony up to Saturday so the boy, who has leukemia and other complications, could participate. Logan has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often results in cancer. Doctors last week gave the boy two to three weeks to live. (AP Photo/Tribune-Review, Eric Schmadel)
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              Paralysed road accident victim Paul Lamb, lies in a bed at his  home in Leeds, northern England Wednesday July 31, 2013. A British appeals court on Wednesday July 31, 2013 upheld a law

    Paralysed road accident victim Paul Lamb, lies in a bed at his home in Leeds, northern England Wednesday July 31, 2013. A British appeals court on Wednesday July 31, 2013 upheld a law

    Posted: 7/31/2013 10:53:03 AM EST
    Paralysed road accident victim Paul Lamb, lies in a bed at his home in Leeds, northern England Wednesday July 31, 2013. A British appeals court on Wednesday July 31, 2013 upheld a law against euthanasia in rejecting appeals from two severely disabled men who argued that doctors should be allowed to legally kill them. In a unanimous ruling, the judges said the two men had "permanent and catastrophic physical disabilities" but said the issue of euthanasia "raises profoundly sensitive questions about the nature of our society." The judges wrote that "Parliament represents the conscience of the nation" and said the court had no jurisdiction to challenge the legal ban on euthanasia. "I am absolutely gutted," said Paul Lamb, one of the men involved, who was severely paralyzed after a car accident. (AP Photo/Anna Gowthorpe/PA) UNITED KINGDOM OUT
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              Patients rest in an outpatient ward of a hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013.  Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to make ends mee

    Patients rest in an outpatient ward of a hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to make ends mee

    Posted: 7/31/2013 8:25:28 AM EST
    Patients rest in an outpatient ward of a hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to make ends meet by accepting money from patients, drug suppliers and others. Accusations this month that GlaxoSmithKline employees bribed Chinese doctors to prescribe its drugs brought international attention to the flow of illicit money. But to China’s public, the practice has long been common knowledge. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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              A patient rests on a bed in the corridor of a crowded hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013.  Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to

    A patient rests on a bed in the corridor of a crowded hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to

    Posted: 7/31/2013 8:25:28 AM EST
    A patient rests on a bed in the corridor of a crowded hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to make ends meet by accepting money from patients, drug suppliers and others. Accusations this month that GlaxoSmithKline employees bribed Chinese doctors to prescribe its drugs brought international attention to the flow of illicit money. But to China’s public, the practice has long been common knowledge.(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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              A patient rests in a ward at a hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013.  Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to make ends meet by accep

    A patient rests in a ward at a hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to make ends meet by accep

    Posted: 7/31/2013 8:25:28 AM EST
    A patient rests in a ward at a hospital in Beijing, China, Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Low salaries and skimpy budgets drive doctors, nurses and administrators to make ends meet by accepting money from patients, drug suppliers and others. Accusations this month that GlaxoSmithKline employees bribed Chinese doctors to prescribe its drugs brought international attention to the flow of illicit money. But to China’s public, the practice has long been common knowledge.(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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              FILE - In this April 26, 2012 file photo, Dr. Ruth Westheimer signs a copy of her book in New York. The famed 85-year-old sex therapist says doctors often lack training in discussing se

    FILE - In this April 26, 2012 file photo, Dr. Ruth Westheimer signs a copy of her book in New York. The famed 85-year-old sex therapist says doctors often lack training in discussing se

    Posted: 7/29/2013 4:27:34 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 26, 2012 file photo, Dr. Ruth Westheimer signs a copy of her book in New York. The famed 85-year-old sex therapist says doctors often lack training in discussing sex with patients, but that they should. She says partners are often as concerned as patients themselves. She was commenting on detailed new guidelines released Monday, July 29, 2013, by the American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology. The groups say doctors need to bring up sex issues early and often after a heart attack, stroke or other heart problem. Sex is often possible and the groups offer advice on when and how to resume intimacy. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
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              FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2010 file photo, Rep.-elect Jamie Herrera, R-Wash., reacts as the incoming House of Representatives members participates in a lottery to pick their office space

    FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2010 file photo, Rep.-elect Jamie Herrera, R-Wash., reacts as the incoming House of Representatives members participates in a lottery to pick their office space

    Posted: 7/29/2013 2:12:12 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2010 file photo, Rep.-elect Jamie Herrera, R-Wash., reacts as the incoming House of Representatives members participates in a lottery to pick their office space in Washington. Herrera Beutler’s first child has survived two weeks after birth despite a pregnancy problem that is usually fatal, and a doctor said Monday, July 29, 2013, that the medical team is cautiously optimistic about the girl’s future. Abigail Rose Beutler was born prematurely on July 15, Herrera Beutler announced Monday. Doctors had diagnosed a serious problem during the pregnancy called Potter Syndrome, in which impaired kidney function leads to low amniotic fluid. It is typically fatal because it prevents the unborn child’s lungs from developing. (AP Photo/Harry Hamburg, File)
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              FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2010 file photo, Republican state Rep. Jaime Herrera looks on during a tour of a business in Vancouver, Wash. U.S. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s first child has

    FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2010 file photo, Republican state Rep. Jaime Herrera looks on during a tour of a business in Vancouver, Wash. U.S. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s first child has

    Posted: 7/29/2013 2:12:12 PM EST
    FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2010 file photo, Republican state Rep. Jaime Herrera looks on during a tour of a business in Vancouver, Wash. U.S. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s first child has survived two weeks after birth despite a pregnancy problem that is usually fatal, and a doctor said Monday, July 29, 2013, that the medical team is cautiously optimistic about the girl’s future. Abigail Rose Beutler was born prematurely on July 15, Herrera Beutler announced Monday. Doctors had diagnosed a serious problem during the pregnancy called Potter Syndrome, in which impaired kidney function leads to low amniotic fluid. It is typically fatal because it prevents the unborn child’s lungs from developing. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
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              Doctors tend to a dead supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi killed during clashes with security forces at Nasr City, where pro-Morsi protesters have held a weeks-long si

    Doctors tend to a dead supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi killed during clashes with security forces at Nasr City, where pro-Morsi protesters have held a weeks-long si

    Posted: 7/27/2013 7:12:38 AM EST
    Doctors tend to a dead supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi killed during clashes with security forces at Nasr City, where pro-Morsi protesters have held a weeks-long sit-in, in a field hospital in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, July 27, 2013. Overnight clashes between security forces and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi in east Cairo left scores of protesters dead following a day of massive pro-military rallies backing a tough hand against Morsi’s backers and the Muslim Brotherhood group from which he hails. (AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa)
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              FILE - This Feb. 10, 2013 file photo shows Frank Ocean performing at the 55th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Ocean is canceling the rest of his Australian live shows because of a

    FILE - This Feb. 10, 2013 file photo shows Frank Ocean performing at the 55th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Ocean is canceling the rest of his Australian live shows because of a

    Posted: 7/26/2013 2:36:17 PM EST
    FILE - This Feb. 10, 2013 file photo shows Frank Ocean performing at the 55th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Ocean is canceling the rest of his Australian live shows because of a tear on his vocal chords. Live Nation posted on its Facebook page early Friday that the Grammy winner was told by doctors to rest his voice after performing in Melbourne at Festival Hall on Thursday night. (Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP, file)


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