Department of Energy Photos on Townhall

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              In this December 2012 photo provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory, materials scientist Ryan Ott, left, and research technician Ross Anderson examine an ingot of mag

    In this December 2012 photo provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory, materials scientist Ryan Ott, left, and research technician Ross Anderson examine an ingot of mag

    Posted: 7/21/2013 1:22:47 PM EST
    In this December 2012 photo provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory, materials scientist Ryan Ott, left, and research technician Ross Anderson examine an ingot of magnesium and rare-earth metals as part of a project to optimize the process to reclaim rare earths from scraps of rare-earth-containing magnets in Ames, Iowa. Across the West, early miners digging for gold, silver and copper had no idea that one day something even more valuable would be hidden in the piles of dirt and rocks they tossed aside. Now thereís a rush in the U.S. to find key components of cellphones, televisions, weapons systems, wind turbines, MRI machines and the regenerative brakes in hybrid cars, a group of versatile minerals on the periodic table called rare earth elements and old mining tailings piles just might be the answer. (AP Photo/U.S. Department of Energy Ames Laboratory)
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              FILE - This 1944 photo provided by the U.S. Department of Energy shows the construction of a "tank farm" to store nuclear waste on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Wash. T

    FILE - This 1944 photo provided by the U.S. Department of Energy shows the construction of a "tank farm" to store nuclear waste on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Wash. T

    Posted: 6/1/2013 3:26:13 PM EST
    FILE - This 1944 photo provided by the U.S. Department of Energy shows the construction of a "tank farm" to store nuclear waste on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Wash. The first 149 storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation were built between 1943 and 1964 with just a single, stainless-steel wall. They were designed to last only 10 to 20 years, because they were intended as a stopgap measure until a more permanent solution could be found to deal with the waste. Turns out the tanks were susceptible to corrosion; some even buckled from the extreme heat radiated by the waste. Between 1959 and 1968, the U.S. Energy Department confirmed that 12 tanks were leaking. (AP Photo/U.S. Department of Energy, File)
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              FILE -This Wednesday, May 9, 2012, file photo, shows  drilling rig near Kennedy, Texas, Wednesday, May 9, 2012. Some thought the South Texas area known as Eagle Ford Shale would never p

    FILE -This Wednesday, May 9, 2012, file photo, shows drilling rig near Kennedy, Texas, Wednesday, May 9, 2012. Some thought the South Texas area known as Eagle Ford Shale would never p

    Posted: 5/2/2013 1:53:30 PM EST
    FILE -This Wednesday, May 9, 2012, file photo, shows drilling rig near Kennedy, Texas, Wednesday, May 9, 2012. Some thought the South Texas area known as Eagle Ford Shale would never produce much oil, but now the Department of Energy predicts it holds 3.4 billion. Some even expect 10 billion, which would make it the biggest oil field in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    Posted: 3/12/2013 1:02:01 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama nominates air quality expert Gina McCarthy to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz to head the Department of Energy and Walmart's philanthropic head Sylvia Mathews Burwell to become director of the White House budget office, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, March 4, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    Posted: 3/9/2013 8:03:48 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama nominates air quality expert Gina McCarthy to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz to head the Department of Energy and Walmart's philanthropic head Sylvia Mathews Burwell to become director of the White House budget office, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, March 4, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    Posted: 3/5/2013 7:44:23 PM EST
    President Barack Obama nominates air quality expert Gina McCarthy to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz to head the Department of Energy and Walmart's philanthropic head Sylvia Mathews Burwell to become director of the White House budget office, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, March 4, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    U.S. President Barack Obama announces new cabinet members in the East Room of the White House in Washington

    Posted: 3/4/2013 2:16:33 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama nominates air quality expert Gina McCarthy to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz to head the Department of Energy and Walmart's philanthropic head Sylvia Mathews Burwell to become director of the White House budget office, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, March 4, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Reed
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              Keith Phillips, energy policy adviser to Gov. Jay Inslee, talks to the media about a tank leak at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, joined by Mary Sue Wilson from the Attorney General's Offi

    Keith Phillips, energy policy adviser to Gov. Jay Inslee, talks to the media about a tank leak at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, joined by Mary Sue Wilson from the Attorney General's Offi

    Posted: 2/15/2013 6:23:22 PM EST
    Keith Phillips, energy policy adviser to Gov. Jay Inslee, talks to the media about a tank leak at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, joined by Mary Sue Wilson from the Attorney General's Office, left, Maia Bellon, director of the Department of Ecology, second from right, and Inslee spokesman David Postman, far right, on Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, in Olympia, Wash. The U.S. Department of Energy said liquid levels are decreasing in one of 177 underground tanks, but that higher radiation levels have not been detected. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)
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              Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee, right, is joined by Maia Bellon, director of the Department of Ecology, at a news conference to discuss a tank leak at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, on

    Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee, right, is joined by Maia Bellon, director of the Department of Ecology, at a news conference to discuss a tank leak at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, on

    Posted: 2/15/2013 6:23:22 PM EST
    Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee, right, is joined by Maia Bellon, director of the Department of Ecology, at a news conference to discuss a tank leak at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, on Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, in Olympia, Wash. The U.S. Department of Energy said liquid levels are decreasing in one of 177 underground tanks, but that higher radiation levels have not been detected. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)
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              In this 2012 photo provided by ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., methane extracted from a hydrate well is burned at a drill site on Alaska’s North Slope. A half mile below the ground at Prudh

    In this 2012 photo provided by ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., methane extracted from a hydrate well is burned at a drill site on Alaska’s North Slope. A half mile below the ground at Prudh

    Posted: 11/11/2012 11:33:27 AM EST
    In this 2012 photo provided by ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., methane extracted from a hydrate well is burned at a drill site on Alaska’s North Slope. A half mile below the ground at Prudhoe Bay, above the vast oil field that helped trigger construction of the trans-Alaska pipeline, a drill rig has tapped what might one day be the next big energy source. The U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners over two winters drilled into a reservoir of methane hydrate, which looks like ice but burns like a candle as warmth from a match releases methane molecules. (AP Photo/ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., Garth Hannum)
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              In this 2012 photo provided by ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., a drill rig at Prudhoe Bay on Alaska’s North Slope is seen. This rig is testing a method for extracting methane from methane h

    In this 2012 photo provided by ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., a drill rig at Prudhoe Bay on Alaska’s North Slope is seen. This rig is testing a method for extracting methane from methane h

    Posted: 11/11/2012 11:33:27 AM EST
    In this 2012 photo provided by ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., a drill rig at Prudhoe Bay on Alaska’s North Slope is seen. This rig is testing a method for extracting methane from methane hydrate. The department describes methane hydrate as a lattice of ice that traps methane molecules but does not bind them chemically. A half mile below the ground at Prudhoe Bay, above the vast oil field that helped trigger construction of the trans-Alaska pipeline, a drill rig has tapped what might one day be the next big energy source. The U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners over two winters drilled into a reservoir of methane hydrate, which looks like ice but burns like a candle as warmth from a match releases methane molecules. (AP Photo/ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc., Garth Hannum)
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              FILE- In this April 30, 2010, file photo, from right, A123 Systems, President and Chief Executive Officer David Vieau, A123 Systems electrical engineer James Fenton and A123 Systems des

    FILE- In this April 30, 2010, file photo, from right, A123 Systems, President and Chief Executive Officer David Vieau, A123 Systems electrical engineer James Fenton and A123 Systems des

    Posted: 10/16/2012 11:53:32 AM EST
    FILE- In this April 30, 2010, file photo, from right, A123 Systems, President and Chief Executive Officer David Vieau, A123 Systems electrical engineer James Fenton and A123 Systems design engineer Antonio Biundo, stand next to President Barack Obama, as he speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Short of cash and hurting from slow sales of electric cars, battery maker A123 Systems Inc. sent its U.S. operations into bankruptcy protection on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, and quickly sold its automotive assets. The filing is likely to stoke the debate in Washington over the Obama administration’s funding of alternative energy companies. In 2009, A123 got a $249 million Department of Energy grant to help it build U.S. factories. Republicans have accused Obama of wasting stimulus money on the companies after the failure of politically connected and now-bankrupt solar power company Solyndra LLC, which left taxpayers on the hook for $528 million. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)
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              FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2007, file photo, President Bush, center, listens to Dave Vieau, President and CEO of A123 Systems, right, as he is shown a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid car utili

    FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2007, file photo, President Bush, center, listens to Dave Vieau, President and CEO of A123 Systems, right, as he is shown a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid car utili

    Posted: 10/16/2012 11:53:32 AM EST
    FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2007, file photo, President Bush, center, listens to Dave Vieau, President and CEO of A123 Systems, right, as he is shown a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid car utilizing a lithium power battery during a demonstration of alternative fuel automobiles on the South Lawn of the White House. Short of cash and hurting from slow sales of electric cars, battery maker A123 Systems Inc. sent its U.S. operations into bankruptcy protection on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, and quickly sold its automotive assets. The filing is likely to stoke the debate in Washington over the Obama administration’s funding of alternative energy companies. In 2009, A123 got a $249 million Department of Energy grant to help it build U.S. factories. Republicans have accused Obama of wasting stimulus money on the companies after the failure of politically connected and now-bankrupt solar power company Solyndra LLC, which left taxpayers on the hook for $528 million. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
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              FILE - In this June 25, 2012 file photo, a crew works on a gas drilling rig at a well site for shale based natural gas in Zelienople, Pa. It sounds like a free-market success story: a n

    FILE - In this June 25, 2012 file photo, a crew works on a gas drilling rig at a well site for shale based natural gas in Zelienople, Pa. It sounds like a free-market success story: a n

    Posted: 9/23/2012 4:18:25 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 25, 2012 file photo, a crew works on a gas drilling rig at a well site for shale based natural gas in Zelienople, Pa. It sounds like a free-market success story: a new gas drilling boom driven by hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, which delivers a vast new source of cheap energy without the government subsidies that solar and wind power demand. But men who helped pioneer fracking recall a different story. From the shale fields of Texas and Wyoming to the Marcellus in the northeast, the U.S. Department of Energy contributed more than $100 million in direct federal research to help develop fracking, and Congress added $10 billion in tax breaks. Now, some of the biggest supporters of shale gas say the government should continue to back renewable energy research - for decades, if need be - to deliver future breakthroughs in that field. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
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    Posted: 4/10/2012 7:40:50 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2006, file photo, a train loaded with coal travels through northeast Wyoming near Gillette. Government data shows U.S. coal exports reached their highest level in two decades last year as strong overseas demand offered an outlet for a fuel that?s been falling from favor at home. The U.S. Department of Energy data analyzed by The Associated Press reveals that coal exports topped 107 million tons in 2011. That?s the highest level since 1991 and more than double the export volume from just six years ago. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik,File)
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    Posted: 4/10/2012 7:40:49 PM EST
    FILE - In this April 2007, file photo, a shovel prepares to dump a load of coal into a 320-ton truck at the Black Thunder Mine in Wright, Wyo. Government data shows U.S. coal exports reached their highest level in two decades last year as strong overseas demand offered an outlet for a fuel that?s been falling from favor at home. The U.S. Department of Energy data analyzed by The Associated Press reveals that coal exports topped 107 million tons in 2011. That?s the highest level since 1991 and more than double the export volume from just six years ago. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
  •  - Britain's Minister of State for Department of Energy Hendry listens during the 13th International Energy Forum in Kuwait City

    Britain's Minister of State for Department of Energy Hendry listens during the 13th International Energy Forum in Kuwait City

    Posted: 3/14/2012 4:08:05 PM EST
    Britain's Minister of State for Department of Energy Charles Hendry listens during the 13th International Energy Forum in Kuwait City March 14,2012. REUTERS/Jassim Mohammed(KUWAIT - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey speaks to members of the media as he arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London

    Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey speaks to members of the media as he arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London

    Posted: 2/3/2012 11:57:02 AM EST
    Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey speaks to members of the media as he arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London February 3, 2012. Employment minister Ed Davey was appointed on Friday as Energy and Climate Change Secretary to replace Chris Huhne who has resigned following news he is to be charged over allegations he tried to cover up a speeding offence. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS ENERGY SOCIETY)
  •  - Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey speaks to members of the media as he arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London

    Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey speaks to members of the media as he arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London

    Posted: 2/3/2012 11:44:55 AM EST
    Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey speaks to members of the media as he arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London February 3, 2012. British Energy Secretary Chris Huhne resigned on Friday after learning he would face criminal charges for allegedly lying to police, a fall from grace that could tweak the dynamics of the coalition government and weaken its environmental agenda. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS ENERGY SOCIETY)
  •  - Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London

    Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London

    Posted: 2/3/2012 11:39:34 AM EST
    Newly-appointed Energy Secretary Ed Davey arrives at the Department of Energy and Climate Change in London February 3, 2012. British Energy Secretary Chris Huhne resigned on Friday after learning he would face criminal charges for allegedly lying to police, a fall from grace that could tweak the dynamics of the coalition government and weaken its environmental agenda. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS ENERGY SOCIETY)