Department of Agriculture Photos on Townhall

  •  - A trader reacts in the Corn Options Pit at the CME group in Chicago

    A trader reacts in the Corn Options Pit at the CME group in Chicago

    Posted: 7/11/2012 4:55:39 PM EST
    A trader reacts in the Corn Options Pit at the CME group in Chicago July 11, 2012, after the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) updated its crop production, ending stocks and world supply/demand forecast. REUTERS/John Gress
  •  - A trader reacts in the Corn Options Pit at the CME group in Chicago

    A trader reacts in the Corn Options Pit at the CME group in Chicago

    Posted: 7/11/2012 1:52:28 PM EST
    A trader reacts in the Corn Options Pit at the CME group in Chicago July 11, 2012, after the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) updated its crop production, ending stocks and world supply/demand forecast. REUTERS/John Gress
  •  -
    Posted: 6/5/2012 3:00:55 PM EST
    In this Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2011 file photo pre-K student Titus Bailey waitd in line for his lunch tray at West Hamlin Elementary School in West Hamlin, W. V. The nation?s school districts are turning up their noses at ?pink slime,? the beef product that caused a public uproar earlier this year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the vast majority of states participating in its National School Lunch Program have opted to order ground beef that doesn?t contain the product known as lean finely textured beef. (AP Photo/The Herald-Dispatch, Lori Wolfe)
  •  -
    Posted: 6/5/2012 12:15:47 PM EST
    FILE - This March 29, 2012, file photo, shows the beef product known as lean finely textured beef, or "pink slime," during a plant tour of Beef Products Inc. in South Sioux City, Neb., where the product is made. The nation?s school districts are turning up their noses at ?pink slime,? the beef product that caused a public uproar earlier this year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the vast majority of states participating in its National School Lunch Program have opted to order ground beef that doesn?t contain the product known as lean finely textured beef. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/21/2012 5:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this March 29, 2012 file photo, the beef product known as lean finely textured beef, or "pink slime," is displayed during a plant tour of Beef Products Inc. in South Sioux City, Neb., where the product is made. Gerald Zirnstein, the microbiologist who coined the term "pink slime," says it came to him in the spur of the moment as he was composing an email to a coworker at the U.S. Department of Agriculture a decade ago. Although it's been used as a filler for decades, the product became the center of controversy only after Zirnstein's vivid moniker for it was quoted in a 2009 New York Times article on the safety of meat processing methods. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:50:46 PM EST
    Andy Hall plants corn in a field, Thursday, May 10, 2012, near Bondurant, Iowa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates a record corn crop this year, topping the previous high by 11 percent.(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:50:45 PM EST
    Mike Young walks through a field after preparing it for corn planting, Thursday, May 10, 2012, near Farrar, Iowa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates a record corn crop this year, topping the previous high by 11 percent.(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:50:45 PM EST
    Andy Hall plants corn in a field, Thursday, May 10, 2012, near Bondurant, Iowa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates a record corn crop this year, topping the previous high by 11 percent.(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/10/2012 4:50:45 PM EST
    A corn plant grows in a field next to a corn cob from last year's crop, Thursday, May 10, 2012, near Ankeny, Iowa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates a record corn crop this year, topping the previous high by 11 percent.(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
  •  - The U.S. Department of Agriculture is seen in Washington

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is seen in Washington

    Posted: 5/5/2012 7:38:49 PM EST
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is seen in Washington, March 18, 2012. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
  •  -
    Posted: 5/2/2012 11:05:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 26, 2010 file photo, former University of Kentucky basketball star, and then Kentucky agriculture commissioner Richie Farmer, talks with reporters during the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair in Louisville, Ky. A state audit turned up allegations that there was a "toxic culture of entitlement" in the Department of Agriculture under Farmer. His attorney, Guthrie True, dismissed the audit as politically motivated and said he did not believe it would lead to criminal charges. (AP Photo/Ed Reinke, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 3/29/2012 3:20:46 AM EST
    In this Feb. 9, 2012, photo Dave and Sue Greenlee look over their cold-hearty grapevines at Tucker's Walk Vineyard in Garretson, S.D. A $2.5 million U.S. Department of Agriculture grant is helping university researchers from across a dozen northern-tier states help winemakers and grape growers such as the Greenlees share expertise and develop their markets. (AP Photo/Dirk Lammers)
  •  -
    Posted: 3/29/2012 3:20:46 AM EST
    In this Feb. 9, 2012, photo Dave Greenlee pours a glass of a 2011 Marquette nearly ready for bottling at Tucker's Walk Vineyard run by he and his wife, Sue, in Garretson, S.D. A $2.5 million U.S. Department of Agriculture grant is helping university researchers from across a dozen northern-tier states help winemakers and grape growers such as the Greenlees share expertise and develop their markets. (AP Photo/Dirk Lammers)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/19/2012 8:45:47 AM EST
    In this 2006 photo provided by Mary Hanks, Jerry Heil, bottom center, poses with many of the staff of the division he managed at the Minnesota Department of Agriculture during his retirement party in Minneapolis. Heil and his wife Barbara, of White Bear Lake, are the only Americans unaccounted for among the more than 4,200 people aboard the Costa Concordia when it struck a reef Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 near Tuscany, Italy. (AP Photo/Courtesy Mary Hanks)
  •  -
    Posted: 1/9/2012 11:15:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this file photo taken in July 2009, a technician dumps seafood byproducts into a hydrolysis machine at the Fishery Industrial Technology Center in Kodiak, Alaska. The U.S. Department of Agriculture will close 259 domestic offices, labs and other facilities as part of an effort to save $150 million per year, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Monday, Jan. 9, 2012. (AP photo/University Of Alaska Fairbanks)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/23/2011 3:00:50 PM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows Plum Island, a tiny island off the coast of New York's Long Island where the nation's primary animal disease laboratory is located. A New York Congressman opposes moving the research operations on the island to Manhattan, Kan., when a "perfectly good" facility already exists off the tip of eastern Long Island. (AP Photo/USDA-ARS, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/23/2011 3:00:50 PM EST
    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows Plum Island, a tiny island off the coast of New York's Long Island where the nation's primary animal disease laboratory is located. A New York Congressman opposes moving the research operations on the island to Manhattan, Kan., when a "perfectly good" facility already exists off the tip of eastern Long Island. (AP Photo/USDA-ARS, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/23/2011 10:25:48 AM EST
    FILE - This Feb. 9, 2004 file photo shows emerald ash borer samples taken by U.S. Department of Agriculture plant protection quarantine officer Brian Sullivan in Romulus, Mich. The invasive pest has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the United States and Canada. A 2011 survey shows the tiny, green beetle hasn't been detected outside of the 15 states where it's already known to exist, but it has been found in more counties in those states than last year. (AP Photo/Jerry S. Mendoza, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/5/2011 5:40:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this June, 28, 2011 file photo birds are shown at a colonial waterbird nesting site as a refinery stands in the background along the Houston Ship Channel, in Baytown, Texas. The island is part of a project to restore lost wetlands and islands off the Texas coast. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Monday pledged $50 million to a program designed to restore seven river basins from Florida to Texas, in an attempt to show a blueprint for rebuilding the Gulf Coast's fragile ecosystem is more than just another federal report. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
  •  -
    Posted: 12/5/2011 5:40:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this June, 28, 2011 file photo birds are shown at a colonial waterbird nesting site along the Houston Ship Channel, in Baytown, Texas. The island is part of a project to restore lost wetlands and islands off the Texas coast. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Monday pledged $50 million to a program designed to restore seven river basins from Florida to Texas, in an attempt to show a blueprint for rebuilding the Gulf Coast's fragile ecosystem is more than just another federal report. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)


TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP