demographics Photos on Townhall

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              In this photo taken April 19, 2013, Lisa Inglis, 43, of Quakertown, Pa., sits in a booth at John's Plain & Fancy Diner in Quakertown, Pa. Inglis, who calls herself a liberal Republican,

    In this photo taken April 19, 2013, Lisa Inglis, 43, of Quakertown, Pa., sits in a booth at John's Plain & Fancy Diner in Quakertown, Pa. Inglis, who calls herself a liberal Republican,

    Posted: 4/22/2013 4:58:29 PM EST
    In this photo taken April 19, 2013, Lisa Inglis, 43, of Quakertown, Pa., sits in a booth at John's Plain & Fancy Diner in Quakertown, Pa. Inglis, who calls herself a liberal Republican, said the Sandy Hook massacre left her deeply ambivalent about guns and gun control, but believes the Senate should have been able to compromise on legislation. In the emotional politics of gun control, the suburbs seem to be emerging as a new sphere of influence. The Senate's defeat last week of new firearms restrictions underscored the nation's shifting demographics and a pronounced divide on the gun issue between Americans in rural areas and in the suburbs. (AP Photo/Michael Rubinkam)
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              In this photo taken April 19, 2013, Lisa Inglis, 43, of Quakertown, Pa., sits in a booth at John's Plain & Fancy Diner in Quakertown, Pa. Inglis, who calls herself a liberal Republican,

    In this photo taken April 19, 2013, Lisa Inglis, 43, of Quakertown, Pa., sits in a booth at John's Plain & Fancy Diner in Quakertown, Pa. Inglis, who calls herself a liberal Republican,

    Posted: 4/22/2013 4:58:29 PM EST
    In this photo taken April 19, 2013, Lisa Inglis, 43, of Quakertown, Pa., sits in a booth at John's Plain & Fancy Diner in Quakertown, Pa. Inglis, who calls herself a liberal Republican, said the Sandy Hook massacre left her deeply ambivalent about guns and gun control, but believes the Senate should have been able to compromise on legislation. In the emotional politics of gun control, the suburbs seem to be emerging as a new sphere of influence. The Senate's defeat last week of new firearms restrictions underscored the nation's shifting demographics and a pronounced divide on the gun issue between Americans in rural areas and in the suburbs. (AP Photo/Michael Rubinkam)
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              FILE - This Nov. 20, 2010 file photo shows Archbishop of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Albert Malcolm Ranjith Patabendige Don being elevated to cardinal during a consistory inside St. Peter's Bas

    FILE - This Nov. 20, 2010 file photo shows Archbishop of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Albert Malcolm Ranjith Patabendige Don being elevated to cardinal during a consistory inside St. Peter's Bas

    Posted: 3/7/2013 6:23:24 AM EST
    FILE - This Nov. 20, 2010 file photo shows Archbishop of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Albert Malcolm Ranjith Patabendige Don being elevated to cardinal during a consistory inside St. Peter's Basilica, at the Vatican. Ranjith, who in 2010 was named Sri Lanka's second cardinal in history, now is being mentioned among the possible successors to Benedict XVI if the conclave looks beyond Europe to acknowledge the shifting "southern'' demographics of the church. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito, File)
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              FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2009 file photo, Illinois Republican Chairman Pat Brady speaks at a news conference in Chicago. GOP leaders in Illinois and nationwide vowed after a drubbing at t

    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2009 file photo, Illinois Republican Chairman Pat Brady speaks at a news conference in Chicago. GOP leaders in Illinois and nationwide vowed after a drubbing at t

    Posted: 2/14/2013 3:23:30 PM EST
    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2009 file photo, Illinois Republican Chairman Pat Brady speaks at a news conference in Chicago. GOP leaders in Illinois and nationwide vowed after a drubbing at the polls last fall to be more inclusive and diverse. Brady says if the party has any hope of winning the 2014 governor’s race or gaining seats in the General Assembly it must do more to appeal to young people, minorities and women _ demographics that helped Democrats to huge wins in November 2012. Gay-rights supporters say the bill to end Illinois’ ban on same-sex marriage provides a perfect opening for Republicans to do just that. The Illinois Senate is scheduled to vote on the measure Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
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              In this photo taken Wednesday June 20, 2012, David Kosmecki, right, 23, was stopped and charged with possession of marijuana by Idaho State Police trooper Justin Klitch, left, in Fruitl

    In this photo taken Wednesday June 20, 2012, David Kosmecki, right, 23, was stopped and charged with possession of marijuana by Idaho State Police trooper Justin Klitch, left, in Fruitl

    Posted: 12/8/2012 1:08:31 PM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday June 20, 2012, David Kosmecki, right, 23, was stopped and charged with possession of marijuana by Idaho State Police trooper Justin Klitch, left, in Fruitland, Idaho after leaving Oregon. As the Evergreen state works out the various complications of its new law, including the fact that marijuana is still illegal under federal law, neighbors of Washington are watching with curiosity, and perhaps some apprehension. Idaho officials already have their hands full with Idahoans obtaining medical marijuana cards out of state. The Gem State borders three medical marijuana states, a reality that has caused medical marijuana arrests to outpace those of traffickers or other users. Although Idaho is a largely conservative state, there are pockets defined by borders and demographics that could create new challenges for law enforcement. (AP Photo/Nigel Duara)
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              In this photo taken Wednesday June 20, 2012, David Kosmecki, left, talks to Idaho State Police Trooper Justin Klitch in Fruitland, Idaho. Kosmecki was stopped and charged with possessio

    In this photo taken Wednesday June 20, 2012, David Kosmecki, left, talks to Idaho State Police Trooper Justin Klitch in Fruitland, Idaho. Kosmecki was stopped and charged with possessio

    Posted: 12/8/2012 1:08:31 PM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday June 20, 2012, David Kosmecki, left, talks to Idaho State Police Trooper Justin Klitch in Fruitland, Idaho. Kosmecki was stopped and charged with possession of marijuana after leaving Oregon. As the Evergreen state works out the various complications of its new law, including the fact that marijuana is still illegal under federal law, neighbors of Washington are watching with curiosity, and perhaps some apprehension. Idaho officials already have their hands full with Idahoans obtaining medical marijuana cards out of state. The Gem State borders three medical marijuana states, a reality that has caused medical marijuana arrests to outpace those of traffickers or other users. Although Idaho is a largely conservative state, there are pockets defined by borders and demographics that could create new challenges for law enforcement. (AP Photo/Nigel Duara)
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              In this photo taken June 20, 2012, Idaho State Police Trooper Justin Klitch walks away from a car he stopped on the Idaho-Oregon border in Fruitland, Idaho.  As the Evergreen state work

    In this photo taken June 20, 2012, Idaho State Police Trooper Justin Klitch walks away from a car he stopped on the Idaho-Oregon border in Fruitland, Idaho. As the Evergreen state work

    Posted: 12/8/2012 1:08:31 PM EST
    In this photo taken June 20, 2012, Idaho State Police Trooper Justin Klitch walks away from a car he stopped on the Idaho-Oregon border in Fruitland, Idaho. As the Evergreen state works out the various complications of its new law, including the fact that marijuana is still illegal under federal law, neighbors of Washington are watching with curiosity, and perhaps some apprehension. Idaho officials already have their hands full with Idahoans obtaining medical marijuana cards out of state. The Gem State borders three medical marijuana states, a reality that has caused medical marijuana arrests to outpace those of traffickers or other users. Although Idaho is a largely conservative state, there are pockets defined by borders and demographics that could create new challenges for law enforcement. (AP Photo/Nigel Duara)
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              FILE - This Nov. 6, 2012 file photo shows voters in the Weston Ranch area of Stockton, Calif.  It's not just the economy. It's the demographics _ the changing face of America. The 2012

    FILE - This Nov. 6, 2012 file photo shows voters in the Weston Ranch area of Stockton, Calif. It's not just the economy. It's the demographics _ the changing face of America. The 2012

    Posted: 11/10/2012 9:58:28 AM EST
    FILE - This Nov. 6, 2012 file photo shows voters in the Weston Ranch area of Stockton, Calif. It's not just the economy. It's the demographics _ the changing face of America. The 2012 elections drove home trends that have been embedded in the fine print of birth and death rates, immigration statistics and census charts for years. America is rapidly getting more diverse. And, more gradually, so is its electorate. Non-whites made up 28 percent of the electorate this year, up from 21 percent in 2000, and much of that growth is coming from Hispanics. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
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              FILE - This Nov. 6, 2012 file photo shows voters lined up in the dark to beat the 7:00 p.m. deadline to cast their ballots at a polling station in Miami.  It's not just the economy. It'

    FILE - This Nov. 6, 2012 file photo shows voters lined up in the dark to beat the 7:00 p.m. deadline to cast their ballots at a polling station in Miami. It's not just the economy. It'

    Posted: 11/10/2012 9:58:28 AM EST
    FILE - This Nov. 6, 2012 file photo shows voters lined up in the dark to beat the 7:00 p.m. deadline to cast their ballots at a polling station in Miami. It's not just the economy. It's the demographics _ the changing face of America. The 2012 elections drove home trends that have been embedded in the fine print of birth and death rates, immigration statistics and census charts for years. America is rapidly getting more diverse. And, more gradually, so is its electorate. Non-whites made up 28 percent of the electorate this year, up from 21 percent in 2000, and much of that growth is coming from Hispanics. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
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              Graphic shows Colorado's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Graphic shows Colorado's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Posted: 10/2/2012 2:28:38 PM EST
    Graphic shows Colorado's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate
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              Graphic shows North Carolina's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate.

    Graphic shows North Carolina's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate.

    Posted: 9/28/2012 3:43:25 AM EST
    Graphic shows North Carolina's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate.
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              Graphic shows North Carolina’s past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Graphic shows North Carolina’s past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Posted: 9/15/2012 12:03:29 PM EST
    Graphic shows North Carolina’s past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate
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              Graphic shows Florida's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Graphic shows Florida's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Posted: 9/14/2012 5:13:48 PM EST
    Graphic shows Florida's past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate
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              In this photo released by the New York City Police Department, NYC Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, center, briefs other NYPD officials and John O. Brennan, assistant to the President

    In this photo released by the New York City Police Department, NYC Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, center, briefs other NYPD officials and John O. Brennan, assistant to the President

    Posted: 8/21/2012 2:53:29 AM EST
    In this photo released by the New York City Police Department, NYC Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, center, briefs other NYPD officials and John O. Brennan, assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, center right, on events surrounding the alleged plot to bomb NYC commuter trains on Sept. 11, at Police Headquarters in New York, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2009. Seated at the table from left are Katherine Lemire, special council to the police commissioner; Deputy Inspector John Nicholson of the Joint Terrorism Task Force; Commanding Officer of the NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau, Assistant Chief James Waters; Deputy Commissioner of the Counterterrorism Bureau, Richard Falkenrath; John O. Brennan; Raymond Kelly; Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence, David Cohen; Commander of the Joint Terrorism Task Force, Deputy Chief James Shea; Lt. Joseph Falco of the Joint Terrorism Task Force and Assistant Chief Thomas Galati, who commands the Intelligence Division. In more than six years spying on Muslim neighborhoods, the New York Police Department’s secret Demographics Unit never generated a lead or triggered a terrorism investigation. That’s according to court testimony unsealed Monday, Aug. 20, 2012. The Demographics Unit is at the heart of a police spying effort built with help from the CIA. The unit created databases on where Muslims lived, shopped, worked and prayed. As part of a longstanding federal civil rights case, Galati offered the first official look at the unit. Galati testified as part of a lawsuit over police spying on students, civil rights groups and suspected Communist sympathizers during the 1950s and 1960s. (AP Photo/NYPD)
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              FILE - This Jan. 13, 2012, file photo shows former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during an interview in Ridgeland, Miss. Asked about the political evolution of the southern states Barb

    FILE - This Jan. 13, 2012, file photo shows former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during an interview in Ridgeland, Miss. Asked about the political evolution of the southern states Barb

    Posted: 8/19/2012 10:48:36 AM EST
    FILE - This Jan. 13, 2012, file photo shows former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during an interview in Ridgeland, Miss. Asked about the political evolution of the southern states Barbour, a Republican, former national party chairman and two-term governor, said the demographics are important but can be overemphasized. He acknowledged GOP concerns that Hispanics will vote Obama in proportions Romney cannot overcome “if the election for them is only about immigration”. But, he added, “Never mind that their unemployment is so much higher than the national average. ... If the election for them is about the economy, we can do well.” (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
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              Graphic shows Nevada’s past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Graphic shows Nevada’s past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate

    Posted: 7/28/2012 11:28:26 AM EST
    Graphic shows Nevada’s past presidential winners, demographics and jobless rate
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    Posted: 5/28/2012 1:00:49 PM EST
    In this April 27, 2012 photo, markers with the letters GAR, which stands for Grand Army of the Republic, stand by the grave sites of soldiers who served in the Civil War at Prospect Hill Cemetery in Guilderland, N.Y. Nearly 150 years after the last fusillade of the Civil War, historians, authors and museum curators are still finding new topics to explore as the nation commemorates the sesquicentennial of America?s bloodiest conflict. Even the long-accepted death toll of 620,000, cited by historians since 1900, is being reconsidered. In a study published late last year in Civil War History, Binghamton University history demographics professor J. David Hacker said the toll is actually closer to 750,000. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
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    Posted: 5/28/2012 1:00:49 PM EST
    In this April 27, 2012 photo, grave stones for soldiers killed in action or after the Civil War are seen at Albany Rural Cemetery in Menands, N.Y. Nearly 150 years after the last fusillade of the Civil War, historians, authors and museum curators are still finding new topics to explore as the nation commemorates the sesquicentennial of America?s bloodiest conflict. Even the long-accepted death toll of 620,000, cited by historians since 1900, is being reconsidered. In a study published late last year in Civil War History, Binghamton University history demographics professor J. David Hacker said the toll is actually closer to 750,000. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
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    Posted: 5/28/2012 1:00:49 PM EST
    In this April 27, 2012 photo, the names of Albany residents who died in action during the Civil War are listed on a monument at Albany Rural Cemetery in Menands, N.Y. Nearly 150 years after the last fusillade of the Civil War, historians, authors and museum curators are still finding new topics to explore as the nation commemorates the sesquicentennial of America?s bloodiest conflict. Even the long-accepted death toll of 620,000, cited by historians since 1900, is being reconsidered. In a study published late last year in Civil War History, Binghamton University history demographics professor J. David Hacker said the toll is actually closer to 750,000. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
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    Posted: 5/28/2012 1:00:49 PM EST
    In this April 27, 2012 photo, a monument that bears a medallion of President Abraham Lincoln and the names of Albany residents who died in action during the Civil War is seen at Albany Rural Cemetery in Menands, N.Y. Nearly 150 years after the last fusillade of the Civil War, historians, authors and museum curators are still finding new topics to explore as the nation commemorates the sesquicentennial of America?s bloodiest conflict. Even the long-accepted death toll of 620,000, cited by historians since 1900, is being reconsidered. In a study published late last year in Civil War History, Binghamton University history demographics professor J. David Hacker said the toll is actually closer to 750,000. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)