Default Photos on Townhall

  •  - Nalbandian of Argentina reacts after losing by default to Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament in London

    Nalbandian of Argentina reacts after losing by default to Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament in London

    Posted: 6/17/2012 12:22:39 PM EST
    David Nalbandian of Argentina reacts after losing by default to Marin Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at the Queen's Club tennis tournament in London June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT TENNIS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - Nalbandian is interviewed as he leaves court following his loss by default to Cilic during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament

    Nalbandian is interviewed as he leaves court following his loss by default to Cilic during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament

    Posted: 6/17/2012 12:04:34 PM EST
    David Nalbandian of Argentina, seen on a big screen, is interviewed as he leaves the court following his loss by default to Marin Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at the Queen's Club tennis tournament in London June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT TENNIS)
  •  - Cilic holds his trophy after winning his men's singles final match against Nalbandian, who lost by default at Queen's Club tennis tournament in London

    Cilic holds his trophy after winning his men's singles final match against Nalbandian, who lost by default at Queen's Club tennis tournament in London

    Posted: 6/17/2012 12:02:48 PM EST
    Marin Cilic of Croatia holds his trophy after winning his men's singles final match against David Nalbandian of Argentina, who lost by default at the Queen's Club tennis tournament in London June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT TENNIS)
  •  - Cilic holds his trophy after winning his men's singles final match against Nalbandian, who lost by default at Queen's Club tennis tournament

    Cilic holds his trophy after winning his men's singles final match against Nalbandian, who lost by default at Queen's Club tennis tournament

    Posted: 6/17/2012 12:01:28 PM EST
    Marin Cilic of Croatia holds his trophy after winning his men's singles final match against David Nalbandian of Argentina, who lost by default at the Queen's Club tennis tournament in London June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT TENNIS)
  •  - Nalbandian of Argentina leaves court after losing by default to Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament

    Nalbandian of Argentina leaves court after losing by default to Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament

    Posted: 6/17/2012 11:59:48 AM EST
    David Nalbandian of Argentina leaves the court after losing by default to Marin Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at the Queen's Club tennis tournament in London June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT TENNIS)
  •  - Nalbandian of Argentina reacts after losing by default to Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament in London

    Nalbandian of Argentina reacts after losing by default to Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at Queen's Club tennis tournament in London

    Posted: 6/17/2012 11:58:49 AM EST
    David Nalbandian of Argentina reacts after losing by default to Marin Cilic of Croatia during their men's singles final match at the Queen's Club tennis tournament in London June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT TENNIS)
  •  - To match Insight CHINA-BOND/DEFAULT

    To match Insight CHINA-BOND/DEFAULT

    Posted: 5/20/2012 10:05:38 PM EST
    A man walks through a gate of a factory of Shandong Helon Co. Ltd. in Weifang, Shandong province in this April 23, 2012 picture. The Chinese official was adamant the city of Weifang would keep its rayon factory open, noting that local authorities had just stepped in to help the plant's owner repay $60 million in commercial paper. The bailout averted what would have been China's first ever bond default and was good news for domestic bond investors, who were reassured that in China even mid-sized state-owned firms can count on "too-big-to-fail" treatment. But for the long term, the opaque, politically driven rescue of Shandong Helon Co bodes ill for a country that must rely heavily on small, private-sector firms for future growth, as investments in infrastructure and basic industry yield diminishing returns. Picture taken April 23, 2012. To match Insight CHINA-BOND/DEFAULT REUTERS/Staff (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - A woman rides an electric tricycle past a bus of Shandong Helon Co. Ltd. in Weifang

    A woman rides an electric tricycle past a bus of Shandong Helon Co. Ltd. in Weifang

    Posted: 5/20/2012 10:02:24 PM EST
    A woman rides an electric tricycle past a bus of Shandong Helon Co. Ltd. in Weifang, Shandong province in this April 23, 2012 photo. The Chinese official was adamant the city of Weifang would keep its rayon factory open, noting that local authorities had just stepped in to help the plant's owner repay $60 million in commercial paper. The bailout averted what would have been China's first ever bond default and was good news for domestic bond investors, who were reassured that in China even mid-sized state-owned firms can count on "too-big-to-fail" treatment. But for the long term, the opaque, politically driven rescue of Shandong Helon Co bodes ill for a country that must rely heavily on small, private-sector firms for future growth, as investments in infrastructure and basic industry yield diminishing returns. Picture taken April 23, 2012. To match Insight CHINA-BOND/DEFAULT REUTERS/Staff (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  -
    Posted: 5/10/2012 2:05:46 PM EST
    In this March 18, 2008 photo, a T-Mobile retail store is shown in Times Square in New York. U.S. consumers have had their fill of expensive, contract-based phone plans. Figures from T-Mobile USA on Thursday,May 10, 2012, added to earlier reports from other companies, indicate that the U.S. wireless industry lost subscribers from contract-based plans for the first time in the first quarter. Contract-based plans are the most lucrative ones for phone companies. The industry default over the past several decades, they account for the vast majority of revenue at the big phone companies. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  •  - To match Insight HUNGARY/

    To match Insight HUNGARY/

    Posted: 3/14/2012 12:48:02 PM EST
    European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso welcomes Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban (C) before their meeting at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels January 24, 2012. Orban has assured his party's dominance well beyond the next elections, due in 2014, by appointing loyalists to key posts in areas like the judiciary and the media. Critics, including the European Union, have said these moves and other laws have weakened democratic checks and balances in the former communist country. Budapest is in a tense legal dispute with Brussels over changes to its central bank law and the judiciary, which the EU says undermine their independence. This has blocked a deal on an EU and IMF loan, which Budapest needs to cut borrowing costs and potentially avoid a default in the most heavily indebted nation in central Europe. Picture taken January 24, 2012. To match Insight HUNGARY/ REUTERS/Francois Lenoir/Files (BELGIUM - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Posted: 3/12/2012 6:16:26 PM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate threat of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Posted: 3/12/2012 8:10:12 AM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate threat of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Posted: 3/12/2012 3:59:20 AM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate threat of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens

    Posted: 3/12/2012 3:59:20 AM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos arrives for a cabinet meeting at the parliament in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate threat of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Posted: 3/10/2012 9:34:24 AM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate risk of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new international bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Posted: 3/10/2012 9:33:50 AM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate risk of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new international bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Posted: 3/10/2012 9:29:27 AM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate risk of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new international bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Posted: 3/10/2012 9:28:50 AM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate risk of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new international bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Posted: 3/9/2012 6:14:08 PM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate risk of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new international bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Greece's Finance Minister Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens

    Posted: 3/9/2012 6:14:05 PM EST
    Greece's Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos addresses reporters during a news conference in Athens March 9, 2012. Greece averted the immediate risk of an uncontrolled default on Friday, winning strong acceptance from its private creditors for a bond swap deal which will eat into its mountainous public debt and clear the way for a new international bailout. REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis