Debt Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - This Aug. 13, 2010 photo shows a sign for Moody's Corp. in New York. Moody's Investors Service upgraded the outlook for U.S. government debt to "stable" from "negative" and affir

    FILE - This Aug. 13, 2010 photo shows a sign for Moody's Corp. in New York. Moody's Investors Service upgraded the outlook for U.S. government debt to "stable" from "negative" and affir

    Posted: 7/18/2013 5:43:52 PM EST
    FILE - This Aug. 13, 2010 photo shows a sign for Moody's Corp. in New York. Moody's Investors Service upgraded the outlook for U.S. government debt to "stable" from "negative" and affirmed the United States' blue chip Aaa rating on Thursday, July 18, 2013. The rating agency cited a surprising drop in the federal deficit - the difference between what the government collects in taxes and what it spends. The U.S. government is on track to report its lowest annual deficit in five years. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              FILE - This Aug. 13, 2010 photo shows a sign for Moody's Corp. in New York. Moody's Investors Service upgraded the outlook for U.S. government debt to "stable" from "negative" and affir

    FILE - This Aug. 13, 2010 photo shows a sign for Moody's Corp. in New York. Moody's Investors Service upgraded the outlook for U.S. government debt to "stable" from "negative" and affir

    Posted: 7/18/2013 5:43:52 PM EST
    FILE - This Aug. 13, 2010 photo shows a sign for Moody's Corp. in New York. Moody's Investors Service upgraded the outlook for U.S. government debt to "stable" from "negative" and affirmed the United States' blue chip Aaa rating on Thursday, July 18, 2013. The rating agency cited a surprising drop in the federal deficit - the difference between what the government collects in taxes and what it spends. The U.S. government is on track to report its lowest annual deficit in five years. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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              Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31 years old, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), partly seen, while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesd

    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31 years old, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), partly seen, while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesd

    Posted: 7/17/2013 4:23:45 AM EST
    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31 years old, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), partly seen, while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz Garcia stopped paying rent after she lost her job ten months ago. She started to receive 670 euros ($879) per month as her unemployment benefit as she was looked for a new job which she has never found. She could not afford to pay the 640 euros ($840) a month rent and electricity bill and buy food at the same time, and the loss of both of her parents during a short period in the last two years left her without a close family support. Time has past and she still has not found a job. She has accumulated a debt of 8,000 euros ($ 10,503) including 2,000 euros ($ 2,625) interest. The eviction was finally postponed with the help of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) and they try to negotiated a social rent and a payment plan. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
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              Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31 years old, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), partly seen, while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesd

    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31 years old, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), partly seen, while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesd

    Posted: 7/17/2013 4:23:45 AM EST
    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31 years old, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), partly seen, while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz Garcia stopped paying rent after she lost her job ten months ago. She started to receive 670 euros ($879) per month as her unemployment benefit as she was looked for a new job which she has never found. She could not afford to pay the 640 euros ($840) a month rent and electricity bill and buy food at the same time, and the loss of both of her parents during a short period in the last two years left her without a close family support. Time has past and she still has not found a job. She has accumulated a debt of 8,000 euros ($ 10,503) including 2,000 euros ($ 2,625) interest. The eviction was finally postponed with the help of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) and they try to negotiated a social rent and a payment plan. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
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              Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz

    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz

    Posted: 7/17/2013 4:23:45 AM EST
    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz Garcia has accumulated 8,000 euros ($10,503) in debt including interest since she stopped paying rent after she lost her job ten months ago. She has been unable to find a new job. The eviction was finally postponed with the help of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), who are trying to negotiate a social rent and a payment plan. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
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              Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz

    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz

    Posted: 7/17/2013 4:23:45 AM EST
    Amaya Munoz Garcia, 31, cries as she receives support from a member of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH) while she waits to be evicted in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. Munoz Garcia has accumulated 8,000 euros ($10,503) in debt including interest since she stopped paying rent after she lost her job ten months ago. She has been unable to find a new job. The eviction was finally postponed with the help of the Victims' Mortgage Platform (PAH), who are trying to negotiate a social rent and a payment plan. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)
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              FILE - In this June 28, 2013 file picture Social Democratic Party chancellor candidate Peer Steinbrueck speaks at a state party conference in Saarbruecken, Germany,  Allegations of wide

    FILE - In this June 28, 2013 file picture Social Democratic Party chancellor candidate Peer Steinbrueck speaks at a state party conference in Saarbruecken, Germany, Allegations of wide

    Posted: 7/17/2013 2:43:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 28, 2013 file picture Social Democratic Party chancellor candidate Peer Steinbrueck speaks at a state party conference in Saarbruecken, Germany, Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance have created turbulence for Angela Merkel on what so far looked like a smooth cruise to a third term as German chancellor, even though it remains to be seen whether the flap will threaten her seriously. Merkel's center-left opponents have seized on disclosures of National Security Agency surveillance programs by leaker Edward Snowden to assert that she hasn't been doing enough to confront Washington and protect Germans' personal data _ and to cast doubt on officials' assertions that they didn't know of the programs. The opposition apparently hopes that the issue will breathe life into a so-far stumbling and gaffe-prone campaign for Sept. 22 parliamentary elections. A healthy economy, low unemployment and perceptions that Merkel has managed Europe's debt crisis well have bolstered the chancellor. Merkel's center-left challenger, Peer Steinbrueck, is suggesting that the government turned a blind eye to violations of Germans' rights and that Merkel violated her oath of office, in which she swore to "keep damage from" her people. (AP Photo/dpa,Oliver Dietze)
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              FILE - In this June 28, 2013 file picture Social Democratic Party chancellor candidate Peer Steinbrueck speaks at a state party conference in Saarbruecken, Germany,  Allegations of wide

    FILE - In this June 28, 2013 file picture Social Democratic Party chancellor candidate Peer Steinbrueck speaks at a state party conference in Saarbruecken, Germany, Allegations of wide

    Posted: 7/17/2013 2:43:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 28, 2013 file picture Social Democratic Party chancellor candidate Peer Steinbrueck speaks at a state party conference in Saarbruecken, Germany, Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance have created turbulence for Angela Merkel on what so far looked like a smooth cruise to a third term as German chancellor, even though it remains to be seen whether the flap will threaten her seriously. Merkel's center-left opponents have seized on disclosures of National Security Agency surveillance programs by leaker Edward Snowden to assert that she hasn't been doing enough to confront Washington and protect Germans' personal data _ and to cast doubt on officials' assertions that they didn't know of the programs. The opposition apparently hopes that the issue will breathe life into a so-far stumbling and gaffe-prone campaign for Sept. 22 parliamentary elections. A healthy economy, low unemployment and perceptions that Merkel has managed Europe's debt crisis well have bolstered the chancellor. Merkel's center-left challenger, Peer Steinbrueck, is suggesting that the government turned a blind eye to violations of Germans' rights and that Merkel violated her oath of office, in which she swore to "keep damage from" her people. (AP Photo/dpa,Oliver Dietze)
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              FILE - In this July 5, 2013 file picture German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich  attends a press conference in Nuremberg, Germany. Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillanc

    FILE - In this July 5, 2013 file picture German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich attends a press conference in Nuremberg, Germany. Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillanc

    Posted: 7/17/2013 2:43:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 5, 2013 file picture German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich attends a press conference in Nuremberg, Germany. Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance have created turbulence for Angela Merkel on what so far looked like a smooth cruise to a third term as German chancellor, even though it remains to be seen whether the flap will threaten her seriously. Merkel's center-left opponents have seized on disclosures of National Security Agency surveillance programs by leaker Edward Snowden to assert that she hasn't been doing enough to confront Washington and protect Germans' personal data - and to cast doubt on officials' assertions that they didn't know of the programs. The opposition apparently hopes that the issue will breathe life into a so-far stumbling and gaffe-prone campaign for Sept. 22 parliamentary elections. A healthy economy, low unemployment and perceptions that Merkel has managed Europe's debt crisis well have bolstered the chancellor. Merkel's center-left challenger, Peer Steinbrueck, is suggesting that the government turned a blind eye to violations of Germans' rights and that Merkel violated her oath of office, in which she swore to "keep damage from" her people. (AP Photo/dpa, Daniel Karmann,File)
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              FILE - In this July 5, 2013 file picture German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich  attends a press conference in Nuremberg, Germany. Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillanc

    FILE - In this July 5, 2013 file picture German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich attends a press conference in Nuremberg, Germany. Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillanc

    Posted: 7/17/2013 2:43:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 5, 2013 file picture German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich attends a press conference in Nuremberg, Germany. Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance have created turbulence for Angela Merkel on what so far looked like a smooth cruise to a third term as German chancellor, even though it remains to be seen whether the flap will threaten her seriously. Merkel's center-left opponents have seized on disclosures of National Security Agency surveillance programs by leaker Edward Snowden to assert that she hasn't been doing enough to confront Washington and protect Germans' personal data - and to cast doubt on officials' assertions that they didn't know of the programs. The opposition apparently hopes that the issue will breathe life into a so-far stumbling and gaffe-prone campaign for Sept. 22 parliamentary elections. A healthy economy, low unemployment and perceptions that Merkel has managed Europe's debt crisis well have bolstered the chancellor. Merkel's center-left challenger, Peer Steinbrueck, is suggesting that the government turned a blind eye to violations of Germans' rights and that Merkel violated her oath of office, in which she swore to "keep damage from" her people. (AP Photo/dpa, Daniel Karmann,File)
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              FILE - In this July 10, 2013 file picture, German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures prior to the weekly cabinet meeting in Berlin .  Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance hav

    FILE - In this July 10, 2013 file picture, German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures prior to the weekly cabinet meeting in Berlin . Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance hav

    Posted: 7/17/2013 2:43:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 10, 2013 file picture, German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures prior to the weekly cabinet meeting in Berlin . Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance have created turbulence for Angela Merkel on what so far looked like a smooth cruise to a third term as German chancellor, even though it remains to be seen whether the flap will threaten her seriously. Merkel's center-left opponents have seized on disclosures of National Security Agency surveillance programs by leaker Edward Snowden to assert that she hasn't been doing enough to confront Washington and protect Germans' personal data - and to cast doubt on officials' assertions that they didn't know of the programs. The opposition apparently hopes that the issue will breathe life into a so-far stumbling and gaffe-prone campaign for Sept. 22 parliamentary elections. A healthy economy, low unemployment and perceptions that Merkel has managed Europe's debt crisis well have bolstered the chancellor. Merkel's center-left challenger, Peer Steinbrueck, is suggesting that the government turned a blind eye to violations of Germans' rights and that Merkel violated her oath of office, in which she swore to "keep damage from" her people. (AP Photo/Ferdinand Ostrop,File)
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              FILE - In this July 10, 2013 file picture, German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures prior to the weekly cabinet meeting in Berlin .  Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance hav

    FILE - In this July 10, 2013 file picture, German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures prior to the weekly cabinet meeting in Berlin . Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance hav

    Posted: 7/17/2013 2:43:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this July 10, 2013 file picture, German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures prior to the weekly cabinet meeting in Berlin . Allegations of widespread U.S. data surveillance have created turbulence for Angela Merkel on what so far looked like a smooth cruise to a third term as German chancellor, even though it remains to be seen whether the flap will threaten her seriously. Merkel's center-left opponents have seized on disclosures of National Security Agency surveillance programs by leaker Edward Snowden to assert that she hasn't been doing enough to confront Washington and protect Germans' personal data - and to cast doubt on officials' assertions that they didn't know of the programs. The opposition apparently hopes that the issue will breathe life into a so-far stumbling and gaffe-prone campaign for Sept. 22 parliamentary elections. A healthy economy, low unemployment and perceptions that Merkel has managed Europe's debt crisis well have bolstered the chancellor. Merkel's center-left challenger, Peer Steinbrueck, is suggesting that the government turned a blind eye to violations of Germans' rights and that Merkel violated her oath of office, in which she swore to "keep damage from" her people. (AP Photo/Ferdinand Ostrop,File)
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              Michael Nicholson, United Auto Workers general counsel speaks to reporters in Detroit, Mich., Wednesday, July 10, 2013.   Detroit pension leaders met behind closed doors Wednesday with

    Michael Nicholson, United Auto Workers general counsel speaks to reporters in Detroit, Mich., Wednesday, July 10, 2013. Detroit pension leaders met behind closed doors Wednesday with

    Posted: 7/10/2013 6:34:48 PM EST
    Michael Nicholson, United Auto Workers general counsel speaks to reporters in Detroit, Mich., Wednesday, July 10, 2013. Detroit pension leaders met behind closed doors Wednesday with the city’s state-appointed emergency manager, who is asking them to endure huge cuts in benefits and health insurance or face the uncertainty of the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. Emergency manager Kevyn Orr did not speak to reporters ahead of Wednesday’s meeting, but a lawyer for some of the pensioners says they were summoned by Orr for a presentation. Some bankruptcy experts say the session could be the tipping point that leads to an unprecedented bankruptcy. The city’s retirement system is underfunded by $3.5 billion. The city’s budget deficit is about $380 million. Orr has said long-term debt could surpass $17 billion. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
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              Michael Nicholson, United Auto Workers general counsel speaks to reporters in Detroit, Mich., Wednesday, July 10, 2013.   Detroit pension leaders met behind closed doors Wednesday with

    Michael Nicholson, United Auto Workers general counsel speaks to reporters in Detroit, Mich., Wednesday, July 10, 2013. Detroit pension leaders met behind closed doors Wednesday with

    Posted: 7/10/2013 6:34:48 PM EST
    Michael Nicholson, United Auto Workers general counsel speaks to reporters in Detroit, Mich., Wednesday, July 10, 2013. Detroit pension leaders met behind closed doors Wednesday with the city’s state-appointed emergency manager, who is asking them to endure huge cuts in benefits and health insurance or face the uncertainty of the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. Emergency manager Kevyn Orr did not speak to reporters ahead of Wednesday’s meeting, but a lawyer for some of the pensioners says they were summoned by Orr for a presentation. Some bankruptcy experts say the session could be the tipping point that leads to an unprecedented bankruptcy. The city’s retirement system is underfunded by $3.5 billion. The city’s budget deficit is about $380 million. Orr has said long-term debt could surpass $17 billion. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
  •  - Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Posted: 7/10/2013 11:52:44 AM EST
    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York, May 7, 2013. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
  •  - Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Posted: 7/10/2013 11:52:44 AM EST
    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York, May 7, 2013. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
  •  - Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Posted: 7/10/2013 11:48:33 AM EST
    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York, May 7, 2013. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
  •  - Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York

    Posted: 7/10/2013 11:48:33 AM EST
    Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, describes charges being brought against the debt settlement company Mission Settlement Agency, at a news conference in New York, May 7, 2013. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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              Greek Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras, center, arrives at the finance ministry for a meeting with Greece's debt inspectors in Athens, Greece on Sunday, July 7, 2013. Greece is trying

    Greek Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras, center, arrives at the finance ministry for a meeting with Greece's debt inspectors in Athens, Greece on Sunday, July 7, 2013. Greece is trying

    Posted: 7/7/2013 2:35:10 PM EST
    Greek Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras, center, arrives at the finance ministry for a meeting with Greece's debt inspectors in Athens, Greece on Sunday, July 7, 2013. Greece is trying to finish negotiations with the troika of the European Union, European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund for the next rescue loan payout worth 8.1 billion euros ($10.4 billion). (AP Photo/Kostas Tsironis)
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              Greek Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras, center, arrives at the finance ministry for a meeting with Greece's debt inspectors in Athens, Greece on Sunday, July 7, 2013. Greece is trying

    Greek Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras, center, arrives at the finance ministry for a meeting with Greece's debt inspectors in Athens, Greece on Sunday, July 7, 2013. Greece is trying

    Posted: 7/7/2013 2:35:10 PM EST
    Greek Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras, center, arrives at the finance ministry for a meeting with Greece's debt inspectors in Athens, Greece on Sunday, July 7, 2013. Greece is trying to finish negotiations with the troika of the European Union, European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund for the next rescue loan payout worth 8.1 billion euros ($10.4 billion). (AP Photo/Kostas Tsironis)