Criticism Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010, file photo, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committ

    FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010, file photo, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committ

    Posted: 1/24/2013 3:13:33 AM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010, file photo, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on AIG. Geithner and the administration endured some of their heaviest criticism for giving government bailout support outside the banking system to insurance giant American International Group.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
  •  - Bernard Cassez, the father of French national Florence Cassez, arrives at the prison where his daughter is imprisoned in Mexico City

    Bernard Cassez, the father of French national Florence Cassez, arrives at the prison where his daughter is imprisoned in Mexico City

    Posted: 1/23/2013 3:51:56 PM EST
    Bernard Cassez, the father of French national Florence Cassez, arrives at the prison where his daughter is imprisoned in Mexico City January 23, 2013. Mexico's Supreme Court on Wednesday will review the case of a French woman serving a 60-year sentence for kidnapping, a conviction that has caused a long-running diplomatic spat with France. Florence Cassez, 38, was convicted in 2008 for participating in a kidnapping ring, but the legal process was riddled with irregularities, prompting criticism of Mexico's justice system and protests from France over her treatment. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW)
  •  - Agustin Acosta, the defense lawyer of Florence Cassez, speaks during an interview with Reuters in his office in Mexico City

    Agustin Acosta, the defense lawyer of Florence Cassez, speaks during an interview with Reuters in his office in Mexico City

    Posted: 1/23/2013 3:51:56 PM EST
    Agustin Acosta, the defense lawyer of Florence Cassez, speaks during an interview with Reuters in his office in Mexico City January 22, 2013. Mexico's Supreme Court on Wednesday will review the case of a French woman serving a 60-year sentence for kidnapping, a conviction that has caused a long-running diplomatic spat with France. Florence Cassez, 38, was convicted in 2008 for participating in a kidnapping ring, but the legal process was riddled with irregularities, prompting criticism of Mexico's justice system and protests from France over her treatment. The hearing before the Supreme Court could set the scene for an early release, if the five-judge panel agrees to discount some of the evidence used to convict her. REUTERS/Henry Romero (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW)
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              FILE - This Aug. 11, 2009, file photo, shows a chicken breast sandwich and water from subway on a kitchen counter in New York. Subway, the world's largest fast food chain, is facing cri

    FILE - This Aug. 11, 2009, file photo, shows a chicken breast sandwich and water from subway on a kitchen counter in New York. Subway, the world's largest fast food chain, is facing cri

    Posted: 1/17/2013 3:58:38 PM EST
    FILE - This Aug. 11, 2009, file photo, shows a chicken breast sandwich and water from subway on a kitchen counter in New York. Subway, the world's largest fast food chain, is facing criticism after an Australian man posted a picture on the company's Facebook page on Jan. 16, 2013, of one of its famous sandwiches next to a tape measure that seems to shows it's not as long as promised. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
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              A bank employee meassures a gold ingot during a press conference at the German central bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back home

    A bank employee meassures a gold ingot during a press conference at the German central bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back home

    Posted: 1/16/2013 9:33:36 AM EST
    A bank employee meassures a gold ingot during a press conference at the German central bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back home some US $36 billion ( 27 billion euro) worth of gold stored in the United States and France. The Bundesbank said in a statement Wednesday that it will repatriate all 374 tons of gold it had stored in Paris by 2020. An additional 300 tons - equivalent to 8 percent of the Bundesbank's total reserves worth about US$183 billion _ will also be shipped from New York to Frankfurt. Frankfurt will hold half of Germany's 3,400 tons of gold by 2020, with New York retaining 37 percent and London storing 13 percent. The move follows criticism from Germany's independent Federal Auditors' Office last year bemoaning the central bank's oversight of gold reserves abroad. (AP Photo/dpa/ Frank Rumpenhorst)
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              Gold ingots are on display during a press conference of Germany's Central Bank at their headquarters in Frankfurt, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back home

    Gold ingots are on display during a press conference of Germany's Central Bank at their headquarters in Frankfurt, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back home

    Posted: 1/16/2013 9:33:36 AM EST
    Gold ingots are on display during a press conference of Germany's Central Bank at their headquarters in Frankfurt, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back home some US $36 billion ( 27 billion euro) worth of gold stored in the United States and France. The Bundesbank said in a statement Wednesday that it will repatriate all 374 tons of gold it had stored in Paris by 2020. An additional 300 tons - equivalent to 8 percent of the Bundesbank's total reserves worth about US $183 billion will also be shipped from New York to Frankfurt. Frankfurt will hold half of Germany's 3,400 tons of gold by 2020, with New York retaining 37 percent and London storing 13 percent. The move follows criticism from Germany's independent Federal Auditors' Office last year bemoaning the central bank's oversight of gold reserves abroad.(AP Photo/ dpa/ Frank Rumpenhorst)
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              A journalist holds a gold ingot next to a security officer of the  German Central Bank, right,  in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back h

    A journalist holds a gold ingot next to a security officer of the German Central Bank, right, in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back h

    Posted: 1/16/2013 9:33:36 AM EST
    A journalist holds a gold ingot next to a security officer of the German Central Bank, right, in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2013. Germany's central bank is to bring back home some US $36 billion ( 27 billion euro) worth of gold stored in the United States and France.The Bundesbank said in a statement Wednesday that it will repatriate all 374 tons of gold it had stored in Paris by 2020. An additional 300 tons - equivalent to 8 percent of the Bundesbank's total reserves worth about $183 billion _ will also be shipped from New York to Frankfurt. Frankfurt will hold half of Germany's 3,400 tons of gold by 2020, with New York retaining 37 percent and London storing 13 percent. The move follows criticism from Germany's independent Federal Auditors' Office last year bemoaning the central bank's oversight of gold reserves abroad. (AP Photo/dpa/ Frank Rumpenhorst)
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              In this Nov. 27, 2012 photo, water flowing from Steve Lipsky's well ignites when he puts a flame to the well spigot outside his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Te

    In this Nov. 27, 2012 photo, water flowing from Steve Lipsky's well ignites when he puts a flame to the well spigot outside his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Te

    Posted: 1/16/2013 3:28:38 AM EST
    In this Nov. 27, 2012 photo, water flowing from Steve Lipsky's well ignites when he puts a flame to the well spigot outside his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence a gas company's drilling operation contaminated Lipsky's drinking water with explosive methane, and possibly cancer-causing chemicals, but withdrew its enforcement action, leaving the family with no useable water supply, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The EPA's decision to roll back its initial claim that hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” operations had contaminated the water is the latest case in which the federal agency initially linked drilling to water contamination and then softened its position, drawing criticism from Republicans and industry officials who insisted they proved the agency was inefficient and too quick to draw conclusions. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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              In a Nov. 26, 2012 photo, a road leads to a natural gas well near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence the gas company's drilling operation contamin

    In a Nov. 26, 2012 photo, a road leads to a natural gas well near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence the gas company's drilling operation contamin

    Posted: 1/16/2013 3:28:38 AM EST
    In a Nov. 26, 2012 photo, a road leads to a natural gas well near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence the gas company's drilling operation contaminated nearby families' drinking water with explosive methane, and possibly cancer-causing chemicals, but withdrew its enforcement action, leaving the families with no useable water supply, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The EPA's decision to roll back its initial claim that hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” operations had contaminated the water is the latest case in which the federal agency initially linked drilling to water contamination and then softened its position, drawing criticism from Republicans and industry officials who insisted they proved the agency was inefficient and too quick to draw conclusions. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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              This Dec. 6, 2012 aerial photo shows a natural gas well, top, in rural Parker County near Granbury, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence the gas company's drilli

    This Dec. 6, 2012 aerial photo shows a natural gas well, top, in rural Parker County near Granbury, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence the gas company's drilli

    Posted: 1/16/2013 3:28:38 AM EST
    This Dec. 6, 2012 aerial photo shows a natural gas well, top, in rural Parker County near Granbury, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence the gas company's drilling operation contaminated nearby drinking water with explosive methane, and possibly cancer-causing chemicals, but withdrew its enforcement action, leaving households with no useable water supply, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The EPA's decision to roll back its initial claim that hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” operations had contaminated the water is the latest case in which the federal agency initially linked drilling to water contamination and then softened its position, drawing criticism from Republicans and industry officials who insisted they proved the agency was inefficient and too quick to draw conclusions. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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              In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky pauses during an interview at  his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had e

    In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky pauses during an interview at his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had e

    Posted: 1/16/2013 3:28:38 AM EST
    In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky pauses during an interview at his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence a gas company's drilling operation contaminated Lipsky's drinking water with explosive methane, and possibly cancer-causing chemicals, but withdrew its enforcement action, leaving the family with no useable water supply, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The EPA's decision to roll back its initial claim that hydraulic fracturing, or ìfracking,î operations had contaminated the water is the latest case in which the federal agency initially linked drilling to water contamination and then softened its position, drawing criticism from Republicans and industry officials who insisted they proved the agency was inefficient and too quick to draw conclusions. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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              In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky pauses during an interview at  his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had e

    In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky pauses during an interview at his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had e

    Posted: 1/16/2013 3:28:38 AM EST
    In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky pauses during an interview at his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence a gas company's drilling operation contaminated Lipsky's drinking water with explosive methane, and possibly cancer-causing chemicals, but withdrew its enforcement action, leaving the family with no useable water supply, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The EPA's decision to roll back its initial claim that hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” operations had contaminated the water is the latest case in which the federal agency initially linked drilling to water contamination and then softened its position, drawing criticism from Republicans and industry officials who insisted they proved the agency was inefficient and too quick to draw conclusions. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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              In this Nov. 27, 2012 photo, a well vent burns as water flows from Steve Lipsky's well outside his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental P

    In this Nov. 27, 2012 photo, a well vent burns as water flows from Steve Lipsky's well outside his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental P

    Posted: 1/16/2013 3:28:38 AM EST
    In this Nov. 27, 2012 photo, a well vent burns as water flows from Steve Lipsky's well outside his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence a gas company's drilling operation contaminated Lipsky's drinking water with explosive methane, and possibly cancer-causing chemicals, but withdrew its enforcement action, leaving the family with no useable water supply, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The EPA's decision to roll back its initial claim that hydraulic fracturing, or ìfracking,î operations had contaminated the water is the latest case in which the federal agency initially linked drilling to water contamination and then softened its position, drawing criticism from Republicans and industry officials who insisted they proved the agency was inefficient and too quick to draw conclusions. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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              In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky demonstrates how his well water ignites when he puts a flame to the flowing well spigot outside his family's home in rural Parker County near W

    In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky demonstrates how his well water ignites when he puts a flame to the flowing well spigot outside his family's home in rural Parker County near W

    Posted: 1/16/2013 3:28:38 AM EST
    In this Nov. 26, 2012 photo, Steve Lipsky demonstrates how his well water ignites when he puts a flame to the flowing well spigot outside his family's home in rural Parker County near Weatherford, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had evidence a gas company's drilling operation contaminated Lipsky's drinking water with explosive methane, and possibly cancer-causing chemicals, but withdrew its enforcement action, leaving the family with no useable water supply, according to a report obtained by The Associated Press. The EPA's decision to roll back its initial claim that hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” operations had contaminated the water is the latest case in which the federal agency initially linked drilling to water contamination and then softened its position, drawing criticism from Republicans and industry officials who insisted they proved the agency was inefficient and too quick to draw conclusions. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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              In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko left, stands with unidentified classmates during a lesson at her school in the southern Russian city

    In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko left, stands with unidentified classmates during a lesson at her school in the southern Russian city

    Posted: 1/14/2013 12:03:25 PM EST
    In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko left, stands with unidentified classmates during a lesson at her school in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. A blind Russian high-schooler's impassioned criticism of the ban on adoption by Americans has added a new and compelling voice to the chorus of condemnation of the law. Since her Jan. 6 blog entry complaining about the ban, written as an open letter to President Vladimir Putin, Natasha Pisarenko has attracted the wide attention of Russian media and, she fears, drawn the disapproving notice of authorities.(AP Photo/APTN)
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              In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko in class at her school in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. A blind Russian high-schooler'

    In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko in class at her school in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. A blind Russian high-schooler'

    Posted: 1/14/2013 12:03:25 PM EST
    In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko in class at her school in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. A blind Russian high-schooler's impassioned criticism of the ban on adoption by Americans has added a new and compelling voice to the chorus of condemnation of the law. Since her Jan. 6 blog entry complaining about the ban, written as an open letter to President Vladimir Putin, Natasha Pisarenko has attracted the wide attention of Russian media and, she fears, drawn the disapproving notice of authorities.(AP Photo/APTN)
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              In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko answers a question during a lesson at her school in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. A bl

    In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko answers a question during a lesson at her school in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. A bl

    Posted: 1/14/2013 12:03:25 PM EST
    In this image from video provided by APTN on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Natasha Pisarenko answers a question during a lesson at her school in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don. A blind Russian high-schooler's impassioned criticism of the ban on adoption by Americans has added a new and compelling voice to the chorus of condemnation of the law. Since her Jan. 6 blog entry complaining about the ban, written as an open letter to President Vladimir Putin, Natasha Pisarenko has attracted the wide attention of Russian media and, she fears, drawn the disapproving notice of authorities.(AP Photo/APTN)
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              In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, a woman selling reggeaton music, right, and movies sits at the store run out of a home in Havana, Cuba. Cuban authorities have recently announced restriction

    In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, a woman selling reggeaton music, right, and movies sits at the store run out of a home in Havana, Cuba. Cuban authorities have recently announced restriction

    Posted: 1/7/2013 2:38:32 PM EST
    In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, a woman selling reggeaton music, right, and movies sits at the store run out of a home in Havana, Cuba. Cuban authorities have recently announced restrictions reportedly declaring state-run recording studios and broadcasts off-limits to songs with questionable lyrics. They also prohibit such music in performance spaces subject to government control. The rules would theoretically apply to all genres, but it’s reggaeton that leading cultural lights have singled out for criticism in official media while warning of new rules governing "public uses of music." (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
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              In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, Yadisbel Ruiz, 17, reads the titles of songs on a reggaeton album at a music and movie store run from a home in Havana, Cuba. Cuban authorities have recently

    In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, Yadisbel Ruiz, 17, reads the titles of songs on a reggaeton album at a music and movie store run from a home in Havana, Cuba. Cuban authorities have recently

    Posted: 1/7/2013 2:38:32 PM EST
    In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, Yadisbel Ruiz, 17, reads the titles of songs on a reggaeton album at a music and movie store run from a home in Havana, Cuba. Cuban authorities have recently announced restrictions reportedly declaring state-run recording studios and broadcasts off-limits to songs with questionable lyrics. They also prohibit such music in performance spaces subject to government control. The rules would theoretically apply to all genres, but it's reggaeton that leading cultural lights have singled out for criticism in official media while warning of new rules governing "public uses of music." (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)
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              Masked Bahraini anti-government protesters run through smoke after burning tires on a road of the western village of Dumistan, Bahrain, Monday, Jan. 7, 2013. Bahrain's highest court has

    Masked Bahraini anti-government protesters run through smoke after burning tires on a road of the western village of Dumistan, Bahrain, Monday, Jan. 7, 2013. Bahrain's highest court has

    Posted: 1/7/2013 5:58:22 AM EST
    Masked Bahraini anti-government protesters run through smoke after burning tires on a road of the western village of Dumistan, Bahrain, Monday, Jan. 7, 2013. Bahrain's highest court has upheld jail sentences against 20 opposition figures convicted of plotting to overthrow the Western-allied government, including eight prominent activists facing life in prison and is almost certain to bring strong criticism from rights groups and touch off more street protests in the violence-wracked Gulf kingdom. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)


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