Credit Rating Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 8/8/2011 12:10:59 PM EST
    Rudolf Oultz watches the display board at the Australia Stock Exchange in Sydney, Monday, Aug. 8, 2011. Australian and New Zealand markets have opened lower in reaction to ratings agency Standard and Poor's downgrading of the United States government credit rating from AAA to AA+. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 6:35:49 PM EST
    In this photo provided by NBC News, Dr. Alan Greenspan, former chairman of the Federal Reserve, speaks on NBC's "Meet the Press" in Washington, Sunday, Aug. 7, 2011. Greenspan said he expects the stock market slide to continue Monday in the wake of a decision by credit rating agency Standard & Poor's to downgrade the U.S. credit rating. He said it will take time for the markets to bottom out, but he said he sees no risk in investing in the United States and says that S&P's downgrade won't change that. (AP Photo/NBC News, William B. Plowman)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 6:35:49 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2011, file photo an electronic board displays trading activity on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York. Anger at the nation?s leaders for taking so long to strike a debt-ceiling deal has turned into high anxiety over jobs and the economy and fears of a new recession. Standard & Poor's downgrading of the nation's credit rating a notch for the first time ever only added to the tension. (AP Photo/Jin Lee, File)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 6:35:49 PM EST
    Tourists drive past Standard & Poor's headquarters in New York's financial district Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011. After the first-ever downgrade of the U.S. government's AAA credit rating by Standard & Poor's on Friday, top officials at the company on Saturday defended their position after the Obama administration called the move a hasty decision based on faulty math. (AP Photo/Karly Domb Sadof)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 6:35:49 PM EST
    In this photo provided by NBC News, Dr. Alan Greenspan, former chairman of the Federal Reserve, and Austan Goolsbee, former chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, right, are interviewed on NBC's "Meet the Press" in Washington, Sunday, Aug. 7, 2011. Greenspan said he expects the stock market slide to continue Monday in the wake of a decision by credit rating agency Standard & Poor's to downgrade the U.S. credit rating. He said it will take time for the markets to bottom out, but he said he sees no risk in investing in the United States and says that S&P's downgrade won't change that. (AP Photo/NBC News, William B. Plowman)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 6:16:17 PM EST
    In this photo provided by NBC News, Dr. Alan Greenspan, former chairman of the Federal Reserve, speaks on NBC's "Meet the Press" in Washington, Sunday, Aug. 7, 2011. Greenspan said he expects the stock market slide to continue Monday in the wake of a decision by credit rating agency Standard & Poor's to downgrade the U.S. credit rating. He said it will take time for the markets to bottom out, but he said he sees no risk in investing in the United States and says that S&P's downgrade won't change that. (AP Photo/NBC News, William B. Plowman)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 1:45:45 PM EST
    A night view of the Gate building is seen at the Dubai International Financial Center, DIFC, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Sunday Aug. 7, 2011. Stocks tumbled across the Middle East on Sunday as most regional markets reopened following the historic downgrade of the United States' credit rating. The region's markets mostly operate Sunday to Thursday. That meant they were the first to react to credit rating agency Standard & Poor's decision late Friday to cut the U.S. level one notch to AA+ from its top AAA rating. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 11:55:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2011, file photo a pedestrian walks past the New York Stock Exchange on earl in New York, a day stocks around the world tumbled ahead of crucial U.S. jobs figures. Anger at the nation's leaders for taking so long to strike a debt-ceiling deal has turned into high anxiety over jobs and the economy amid growing fears of a new recession. Standard & Poor's downgrading of the nation's credit rating a notch for the first time ever only added to the tension. (AP Photo/Jin Lee, File)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 11:55:47 AM EST
    Sec. of Treasury Tim Geithner, left, partially blocked by his Secret Service agent, walks down the West Wing Colonnade of the White House towards the Oval Office to meet with President Barack Obama, Friday, Aug. 5, 2011 in Washington. Obama met with Geithner prior to his departure for the presidential retreat at Camp David, Md. Credit rating agency Standard & Poor's on Friday, Aug. 5, 2011 lowered the nation's AAA rating for the first time since granting it in 1917. The move came less than a week after a gridlocked Congress finally agreed to spending cuts that would reduce the debt by more than $2 trillion - a tumultuous process that contributed to convulsions in financial markets. The promised cuts were not enough to satisfy S&P. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 11:55:46 AM EST
    FILE - This Monday, Aug. 1, 2011 picture shows the U.S. Capitol just after the House voted to pass debt legislation on Capitol Hill in Washington. Credit rating agency Standard & Poor's says it has downgraded the United States' credit rating for the first time in the history of the ratings. The credit rating agency says that it is cutting the country's top AAA rating by one notch to AA-plus. The credit agency said late Friday, Aug. 5, 2011 that it is making the move because the deficit reduction plan passed by Congress on Tuesday did not go far enough to stabilize the country's debt situation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 11:05:48 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2011, file photo the Senate Minority Leader, Republican Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, approaches the podium for a Capitol Hill news conference after the Senate passed debt-ceiling legislation. Anger at the nation's leaders for taking so long to strike a debt-ceiling deal has turned into high anxiety over jobs and the economy amid growing fears of a new recession. Standard & Poor's downgrading of the nation's credit rating a notch for the first time ever only added to the tension. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
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    Posted: 8/7/2011 11:05:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2011 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., center, accompanied by fellow Senate Democratic leaders, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Anger at the nation's leaders for taking so long to strike a debt-ceiling deal has turned into high anxiety over jobs and the economy amid growing fears of a new recession. Standard & Poor's downgrading of the nation's credit rating a notch for the first time ever only added to the tension. From left are, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Reid, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 8/1/2011 4:45:47 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 22, 2008 file photo, Standard and Poor's President Deven Sharma testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The three major credit rating companies poised to decide whether to downgrade the nation's top-ranked debt standing are also spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to lobby the Obama administration over the way the government regulates them. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson, File)
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    Posted: 7/27/2011 12:05:58 PM EST
    In this July 26, 2011 photo, traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. Global stocks were weighed down again on Wednesday, July 27, by worries that the U.S. could default on its debt or see its credit rating cut as lawmakers in the world's largest economy appear no nearer to agreeing on raising the borrowing limit.(AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
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    Posted: 7/27/2011 12:00:54 PM EST
    In this July 26, 2011 photo, a trader walks on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. Global stocks were weighed down again on Wednesday, July 27, by worries that the U.S. could default on its debt or see its credit rating cut as lawmakers in the world's largest economy appear no nearer to agreeing on raising the borrowing limit.(AP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
  •  - Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos walks to an Institute of International Finance meeting in Washington

    Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos walks to an Institute of International Finance meeting in Washington

    Posted: 7/25/2011 11:23:38 AM EST
    Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos walks to an Institute of International Finance meeting in Washington, July 25, 2011. Ratings agency Moody's cut Greece's credit rating further into junk territory on Monday and said it was almost certain to slap a default tag on its debt as a result of a new EU rescue package. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
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    Posted: 7/25/2011 11:00:52 AM EST
    Athenians drive their cars in front of the Central Bank of Greece building in central Athens on Monday, July 25, 2011. Earlier Monday, Moody's international credit rating agency slashed Greece's rating by three notches to the last toehold above a default. Moody's signaled it was likely to slap a default rating on Greece as a result of its latest international bailout deal, which anticipates losses to private holders of Greek government debt. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
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    Posted: 7/25/2011 11:00:46 AM EST
    A man shields himself from the sun as he crosses the street in front of the Central Bank of Greece building in central Athens on Monday, July 25, 2011. Earlier Monday, Moody's international credit rating agency slashed Greece's rating by three notches to the last toehold above a default. Moody's signaled it was likely to slap a default rating on Greece as a result of its latest international bailout deal, which anticipates losses to private holders of Greek government debt. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
  •  - A woman passes in front of a shop's window in central Athens

    A woman passes in front of a shop's window in central Athens

    Posted: 7/25/2011 10:23:49 AM EST
    A woman passes in front of a shop's window in central Athens July 25, 2011. Moody's cut Greece's credit rating further into junk territory on Monday and said it was almost certain to slap a default tag on its debt as a result of a new EU rescue package. REUTERS/John Kolesidis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
  •  - A woman passes in front of a shop's window with a discount sign in central Athens

    A woman passes in front of a shop's window with a discount sign in central Athens

    Posted: 7/25/2011 10:22:09 AM EST
    A woman passes in front of a shop's window with a discount sign in central Athens July 25, 2011. Moody's cut Greece's credit rating further into junk territory on Monday and said it was almost certain to slap a default tag on its debt as a result of a new EU rescue package. The discount sign reads, "All 50% off". REUTERS/John Kolesidis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)