Congressional Approval Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this June 6, 2012, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, accompanied by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., right, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill i

    FILE - In this June 6, 2012, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, accompanied by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., right, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill i

    Posted: 1/10/2013 2:23:27 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 6, 2012, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, accompanied by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., right, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Barack Obama had a clear political edge in his fight with Republicans over the fiscal cliff, and used it to his advantage. In the upcoming battle over federal borrowing and spending, the leverage will be more evenly divided and the outcome less predictable. In the fiscal cliff fight, Obama wanted to block automatic New Year's Day tax increases on everyone but the country's highest earners. Republicans were trying to protect upper-income people from those tax hikes, but eventually gave in because they didn't want to be blamed for the higher middle-class taxes that a stalemate would have triggered. Next come three deadlines that will almost certainly become entwined. The government will run out of cash in about two months and the Obama administration will need congressional approval to borrow more money or face a first-ever federal default, threatening global, economy-rattling consequences. Boehner and McConnell have said they won't agree to a debt-limit extension without an accord to cut spending. Just as adamantly, Obama says the government's debt ceiling must be raised and he won't negotiate over it, though he says he would bargain over spending cuts and tax increases to reduce federal deficits. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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    Posted: 6/4/2012 8:50:46 PM EST
    Transsexual Taira Tolaba arrives at the civil registry looking to get information on the process to change gender identity, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, June 4, 2012. Argentina's gender identity law that won congressional approval with a 55-0 Senate vote earlier this month went into effect Monday. Transgender rights activists say Argentina now leads the world by granting people the right to change their legal and physical gender identity simply because they want to, without having to undergo judicial, psychiatric and medical procedures beforehand. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
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    Posted: 6/4/2012 8:50:46 PM EST
    Transsexual Sandra Gonzalez holds her passport as she waits for documentation in the legal process to change gender, outside the civil registry, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, June 4, 2012. Argentina's gender identity law that won congressional approval with a 55-0 Senate vote earlier this month went into effect Monday. Transgender rights activists say Argentina now leads the world by granting people the right to change their legal and physical gender identity simply because they want to, without having to undergo judicial, psychiatric and medical procedures beforehand. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
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    Posted: 6/4/2012 8:50:46 PM EST
    Transsexual Taira Tolaba, left, arrives at the civil registry looking to get information on the process to change gender identity, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, June 4, 2012. Argentina's gender identity law that won congressional approval with a 55-0 Senate vote earlier this month went into effect Monday. Transgender rights activists say Argentina now leads the world by granting people the right to change their legal and physical gender identity simply because they want to, without having to undergo judicial, psychiatric and medical procedures beforehand. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
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    Posted: 6/4/2012 8:50:46 PM EST
    Transsexuals Maiamar Abrodos, right, and Maria Laura Aleman pose for a picture as they arrive at the civil registry to begin the legal process to change their gender, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, June 4, 2012. Argentina's gender identity law that won congressional approval with a 55-0 Senate vote earlier this month went into effect Monday. Transgender rights activists say Argentina now leads the world by granting people the right to change their legal and physical gender identity simply because they want to, without having to undergo judicial, psychiatric and medical procedures beforehand. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
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    Posted: 6/4/2012 8:50:46 PM EST
    Transsexual Silvana Daniela Sosa holds a form after beginning the process to change gender, outside the civil registry, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, June 4, 2012. Argentina's gender identity law that won congressional approval with a 55-0 Senate vote earlier this month went into effect Monday. Transgender rights activists say Argentina now leads the world by granting people the right to change their legal and physical gender identity simply because they want to, without having to undergo judicial, psychiatric and medical procedures beforehand. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
  •  - Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Posted: 5/3/2012 2:42:34 PM EST
    Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires May 3, 2012. The nationalization of Argentina's biggest oil company is expected to sail to final congressional approval on Thursday, reflecting broad domestic support for a measure that has rattled foreign investors. President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, a combative career politician who has tightened state control of the economy, unveiled the plan to seize a majority stake in YPF from Spain's Repsol six months after her landslide re-election. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - A man hangs shirts with the YPF logo YPF in front of the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    A man hangs shirts with the YPF logo YPF in front of the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Posted: 5/3/2012 12:33:59 PM EST
    A man hangs shirts with the YPF logo YPF in front of the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires May 3, 2012. The nationalization of Argentina's biggest oil company is expected to sail to final congressional approval on Thursday, reflecting broad domestic support for a measure that has rattled foreign investors. President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, a combative career politician who has tightened state control of the economy, unveiled the plan to seize a majority stake in YPF from Spain's Repsol six months after her landslide re-election. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Posted: 5/3/2012 12:33:11 PM EST
    Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires May 3, 2012. The nationalization of Argentina's biggest oil company is expected to sail to final congressional approval on Thursday, reflecting broad domestic support for a measure that has rattled foreign investors. President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, a combative career politician who has tightened state control of the economy, unveiled the plan to seize a majority stake in YPF from Spain's Repsol six months after her landslide re-election. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - A lawmaker pauses during a debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    A lawmaker pauses during a debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Posted: 5/3/2012 12:30:15 PM EST
    A lawmaker pauses during a debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires May 3, 2012. The nationalization of Argentina's biggest oil company is expected to sail to final congressional approval on Thursday, reflecting broad domestic support for a measure that has rattled foreign investors. President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, a combative career politician who has tightened state control of the economy, unveiled the plan to seize a majority stake in YPF from Spain's Repsol six months after her landslide re-election. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires

    Posted: 5/3/2012 11:41:50 AM EST
    Lawmakers debate in the Argentine Congress in Buenos Aires May 3, 2012. The nationalization of Argentina's biggest oil company is expected to sail to final congressional approval on Thursday, reflecting broad domestic support for a measure that has rattled foreign investors. President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, a combative career politician who has tightened state control of the economy, unveiled the plan to seize a majority stake in YPF from Spain's Repsol six months after her landslide re-election. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: POLITICS ENERGY)
  •  - A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 3/8/2012 5:49:36 PM EST
    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington February 17, 2012. A deal to renew a payroll tax cut for 160 million U.S. workers through 2012 headed toward congressional approval as Democratic and Republican leaders rallied support for the bipartisan agreement. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 3/8/2012 5:48:48 PM EST
    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington February 17, 2012. A deal to renew a payroll tax cut for 160 million U.S. workers through 2012 headed toward congressional approval as Democratic and Republican leaders rallied support for the bipartisan agreement. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 3/8/2012 3:14:05 PM EST
    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington February 17, 2012. A deal to renew a payroll tax cut for 160 million U.S. workers through 2012 headed toward congressional approval as Democratic and Republican leaders rallied support for the bipartisan agreement. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
  •  - The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington

    The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington

    Posted: 2/17/2012 10:12:07 AM EST
    The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington February 17, 2012. A deal to renew a payroll tax cut for 160 million U.S. workers through 2012 headed toward congressional approval as Democratic and Republican leaders rallied support for the bipartisan agreement. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington

    The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington

    Posted: 2/17/2012 10:08:49 AM EST
    The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington February 17, 2012. A deal to renew a payroll tax cut for 160 million U.S. workers through 2012 headed toward congressional approval as Democratic and Republican leaders rallied support for the bipartisan agreement. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
  •  - The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington

    The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington

    Posted: 2/17/2012 10:04:06 AM EST
    The dome of the Capitol is reflected in a puddle in Washington February 17, 2012. A deal to renew a payroll tax cut for 160 million U.S. workers through 2012 headed toward congressional approval as Democratic and Republican leaders rallied support for the bipartisan agreement. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington

    Posted: 2/17/2012 10:01:58 AM EST
    A cyclist passes the Capitol in Washington February 17, 2012. A deal to renew a payroll tax cut for 160 million U.S. workers through 2012 headed toward congressional approval as Democratic and Republican leaders rallied support for the bipartisan agreement. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House

    U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House

    Posted: 10/13/2011 1:29:28 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House, October 13, 2011. Obama and Lee will bask in the glow of U.S. congressional approval of a long-delayed trade deal and co-ordinate strategy on the North Korean nuclear standoff when they hold talks on Thursday. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House

    U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House

    Posted: 10/13/2011 1:29:00 PM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama (not in photo) and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House, October 13, 2011. Obama and Lee will bask in the glow of U.S. congressional approval of a long-delayed trade deal and co-ordinate strategy on the North Korean nuclear standoff when they hold talks on Thursday. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)


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