Collective Bargaining Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 11/15/2011 8:35:50 PM EST
    Mahlon Mitchell, president of the Wisconsin Professional Firefighters union, and Kathleen Falk, a former county executive, walk to the Wisconsin state elections board office to deliver paperwork required to launch an effort to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in Madison, Wis. Opponents of Republican Gov. Scott Walker, spurred by anger over his successful push to remove nearly all collective bargaining rights from most public workers, blanketed Wisconsin on Tuesday to launch an unprecedented effort to gather 540,000 signatures and force a recall election. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer)
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    Posted: 11/15/2011 8:35:50 PM EST
    Linda Wells of Fort Atkinson, Wis., signed paperwork required to start an effort to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker from office on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in Madison, Wis. Wells and other supporters filed the paperwork at the state Government Accountability Office. Opponents of Republican Gov. Scott Walker, spurred by anger over his successful push to remove nearly all collective bargaining rights from most public workers, blanketed Wisconsin on Tuesday to launch an unprecedented effort to gather 540,000 signatures and force a recall election. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer)
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    Posted: 11/15/2011 8:35:49 PM EST
    Supporters of the effort to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker gather about two blocks away as Walker takes part in an announcement at Ruud Lighting in Sturtevant, Wis. that 469 jobs will be added over four years, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Wells and other supporters filed the paperwork at the state Government Accountability Office. Opponents of Republican Gov. Scott Walker, spurred by anger over his successful push to remove nearly all collective bargaining rights from most public workers, blanketed Wisconsin on Tuesday to launch an unprecedented effort to gather 540,000 signatures and force a recall election. (AP Photo/Journal Times, Mark Hertzberg)
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    Posted: 11/15/2011 4:05:48 PM EST
    Carla Koykkari, right, of Madison signs a petition to force a recall election against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker as petition circulator Sue Breckenridge, left, observes on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in Madison, Wis. Opponents of Walker, spurred by anger over his successful push to take away nearly all public worker collective bargaining rights, blanketed the state Tuesday to launch an unprecedented effort to gather 540,000 signatures and force a recall election. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer)
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    Posted: 11/10/2011 6:45:48 PM EST
    A supporter to repeal Senate Bill 5 holds onto his sign during a rally Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio voters on Tuesday rejected a new law restricting the collective bargaining abilities of public employee unions in an unusually vigorous off-year election that drew attention across the nation.Voters also approved a constitutional amendment intended to keep government from requiring Ohioans to participate in any health care system. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
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    Posted: 11/10/2011 6:45:48 PM EST
    FILE - In this July 6, 2011 file photo, Chris Littleton, right, co-founder of the Ohio Liberty Council, and Maurice Thompson, director of 1851 Center for Constitutional Law, answer questions during a news conference in Columbus, Ohio. Just days after Ohio voters overwhelmingly rejected a state law curbing collective bargaining rights, Littleton told The Associated Press the group will submit the proposed wording for its right-to-work amendment to the state's attorney general. The amendment to the state?s constitution would prevent workers covered by union contracts from being required to join unions or pay dues. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
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    Posted: 11/10/2011 7:30:54 AM EST
    Patricia Frost-Brooks, left, president of the Ohio Education Association, hugs Courtney Johnson, an 11th grade teacher from Ironton, Ohio, after Senate Bill 5 was defeated on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohioans are deciding the winner of this year's drawn-out fight over a law limiting collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 2:40:48 PM EST
    Supporters against Senate Bill 5 celebrate after the bill was defeated Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio voters on Tuesday rejected a new law restricting the collective bargaining abilities of public employee unions in an unusually vigorous off-year election that drew attention across the nation. Voters also approved a constitutional amendment intended to keep government from requiring Ohioans to participate in any health care system. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:06 AM EST
    Marchyco Harrell, right, a teacher in the Lorain City Schools, and Verlene DeWitt, a teacher in the Westlake City Schools, listen to speakers at a rally co-sponsored by the Cleveland Teachers Union and We Are Ohio in Cleveland on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011. By voting no on Issue 2, Ohioans in this group hope that Ohio will overturn the controversial Senate Bill 5 which limited collective bargaining for unionized public workers. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:06 AM EST
    Issue 2 opponents cheer at a rally co-sponsored by the Cleveland Teachers Union and We Are Ohio in Cleveland as Issue 2 as they hear election results sounding the defeat of Issue 2 in the Ohio general election on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011. By voting no on Issue 2, Ohioans overturned the controversial Senate Bill 5 which, among other things, limited collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:04 AM EST
    From left, Stephen Harris and Kristin Sutton cheer during a rally to repeal Senate Bill 5 Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohioans are deciding the winner of this year's drawn-out fight over a law limiting collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:04 AM EST
    Issue 2 opponents cheer at a rally co-sponsored by the Cleveland Teachers Union and We Are Ohio in Cleveland as Issue 2 as they hear election results sounding the defeat of Issue 2 in the Ohio general election on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011. By voting no on Issue 2, Ohioans overturned the controversial Senate Bill 5 which, among other things, limited collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:04 AM EST
    Sue Taylor, left, president of the Ohio Federation of Teachers, and Pat Frost-Brooks, president of the Ohio Education Association, celebrate after hearing news that Senate Bill 5 was repealed Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohioans are deciding the winner of this year's drawn-out fight over a law limiting collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:04 AM EST
    Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks about Issue 2 and election results at a news conference Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio voters on Tuesday rejected a new law restricting the collective bargaining abilities of public employee unions in an unusually vigorous off-year election that drew attention across the nation. Voters also approved a constitutional amendment intended to keep government from requiring Ohioans to participate in any health care system. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:03 AM EST
    Scott Dodge, who works for the Columbus water department, celebrates after Senate Bill 5 was defeated Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio voters on Tuesday rejected a new law restricting the collective bargaining abilities of public employee unions in an unusually vigorous off-year election that drew attention across the nation.Voters also approved a constitutional amendment intended to keep government from requiring Ohioans to participate in any health care system. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:03 AM EST
    Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks about Issue 2 and election results at a news conference Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio voters on Tuesday rejected a new law restricting the collective bargaining abilities of public employee unions in an unusually vigorous off-year election that drew attention across the nation. Voters also approved a constitutional amendment intended to keep government from requiring Ohioans to participate in any health care system. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:03 AM EST
    AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka, center, leaves Laborers Local 310's union hall in Cleveland Monday, Nov. 7, 2011. Trumpka spoke to local union members and college students before heading out to knock on doors and talk to voters urging opposition to a ballot issue that would keep a law limiting the collective bargaining rights of hundreds of thousands of public workers. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)
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    Posted: 11/9/2011 4:01:03 AM EST
    Voters cast their ballots at the Wakeman Township fire station near Wakeman, Ohio Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011. Ohioans are deciding the winner of this year's drawn-out fight over a law limiting collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. The issue tops the Election Day list of ballot questions before the state's voters. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)
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    Posted: 11/8/2011 5:41:25 PM EST
    Firefighter Tom Sullivan campaigns against Issue 2 outside a polling location in Strongsville, Ohio Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011. Ohioans are deciding the winner of this year's drawn-out fight over a law limiting collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. The issue tops the election day list of ballot questions before the state's voters. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)
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    Posted: 11/8/2011 5:41:25 PM EST
    Firefighter Tom Sullivan campaigns against Issue 2 outside a polling location in Strongsville, Ohio Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011. Ohioans are deciding the winner of this year's drawn-out fight over a law limiting collective bargaining for 350,000 unionized public workers. The issue tops the Election Day list of ballot questions before the state's voters. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)


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