Collective Bargaining Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 6/6/2012 12:50:48 AM EST
    FILE - This file photo taken Feb. 17, 2011 shows protestors of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's bill to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers packing the rotunda at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. More than a year after the standoff over union rights that rocked Wisconsin and the nation for weeks, the Republican Governor will face Milwaukee's Democratic Mayor Tom Barrett in Tuesday's recall election. (AP Photo/Andy Manis, File)
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    Posted: 6/6/2012 12:50:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this Feb 16, 2011 file photo, protestors to Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers demonstrate at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. More than a year after the standoff over union rights that rocked Wisconsin and the nation for weeks, the Republican Governor will face Milwaukee's Democratic Mayor Tom Barrett in Tuesday's recall election. (AP Photo/Andy Manis, File)
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    Posted: 5/23/2012 7:20:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2011, file photo, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, left, and NFLPA Executive Director Demaurice Smith exchange papers as they sign their collective bargaining agreement at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. The NFL Players Association has filed a complaint Wednesday, May 23, 2012, in federal court accusing the league of colluding to impose a secret salary cap during the uncapped 2010 season. (AP Photo/Phil Long, File)
  •  - Tea Party members meet with Tennessee Representative Mark Pody to discuss legislation in Nashville Tennessee

    Tea Party members meet with Tennessee Representative Mark Pody to discuss legislation in Nashville Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:56:15 AM EST
    Tea Party members meet with Tennessee Representative Mark Pody (back) to discuss legislation in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tea Party members meet with Representative Mark Pody in his office in Nashville, Tennessee

    Tea Party members meet with Representative Mark Pody in his office in Nashville, Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:54:52 AM EST
    Tea Party members Mishelle Perkins (L) and Kurt Potter (back R) along with Clay Stubblefield (front R), president of the Young Republicans at Tennessee Technological University, meet with Representative Mark Pody in his office in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Mishelle Perkins introduces Clay Stubblefield to Tennessee Representative Joe Carr in Nashville, Tennessee

    Mishelle Perkins introduces Clay Stubblefield to Tennessee Representative Joe Carr in Nashville, Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:52:49 AM EST
    Tea Party member Mishelle Perkins introduces Clay Stubblefield (L), president of the young Republicans at Tennessee Technological University, to Tennessee Representative Joe Carr (R) in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tea Party members Mark Herr and Mishelle Perkins discuss legislation during a strategy planning meeting in Nashville, Tennessee

    Tea Party members Mark Herr and Mishelle Perkins discuss legislation during a strategy planning meeting in Nashville, Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:51:31 AM EST
    Tea Party members Mark Herr (front) and Mishelle Perkins discuss legislation during a strategy planning meeting in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tea Party members meet with Tennessee state representatives during lunch at the Tennessee Legislative Plaza in Nashville

    Tea Party members meet with Tennessee state representatives during lunch at the Tennessee Legislative Plaza in Nashville

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:50:00 AM EST
    Tea Party members Rachael Proctor (obscured), Mishelle Perkins (2nd L) and Kurt Potter (2nd R) meet with Tennessee Senator Kerry Roberts (L) and Representative Joe Carr (R) during lunch at the Tennessee Legislative Plaza in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Proctor discusses plans for the afternoon with fellow Tea Party members during lunch at the Tennessee Legislative Plaza in Nashville

    Proctor discusses plans for the afternoon with fellow Tea Party members during lunch at the Tennessee Legislative Plaza in Nashville

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:47:37 AM EST
    Rachael Proctor discusses plans for the afternoon with fellow Tea Party members during lunch at the Tennessee Legislative Plaza in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tea Party member Perkins works with Hines to schedule an appointment to meet with Tennessee Representative Carr in Nashville, Tennessee

    Tea Party member Perkins works with Hines to schedule an appointment to meet with Tennessee Representative Carr in Nashville, Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:46:13 AM EST
    Tea Party member Mishelle Perkins (R) works with Jennifer Hines to schedule an appointment to meet with Tennessee Representative Joe Carr in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tea Party member Mishelle Perkins talks with Tennessee Representative Joe Carr prior to a committee hearing in Nashville

    Tea Party member Mishelle Perkins talks with Tennessee Representative Joe Carr prior to a committee hearing in Nashville

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:43:58 AM EST
    Tea Party member Mishelle Perkins (L) talks with Tennessee Representative Joe Carr prior to a committee hearing in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tennessee State Senator Tracy meets with local Tea Party members Potter and Perkins in his office in Nashville, Tennessee

    Tennessee State Senator Tracy meets with local Tea Party members Potter and Perkins in his office in Nashville, Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:42:13 AM EST
    Tennessee State Senator Jim Tracy meets with local Tea Party members Kurt Potter (C) and Mishelle Perkins in his office in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tea Party member Proctor checks her emails and calendar as she schedules appointments with representatives in Nashville, Tennessee

    Tea Party member Proctor checks her emails and calendar as she schedules appointments with representatives in Nashville, Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:40:51 AM EST
    Tea Party member Rachael Proctor checks her emails and calendar as she schedules appointments with representatives in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
  •  - Tea Party members Potter, Proctor and Perkins discuss strategy as they wait for a committee meeting to start in Nashville, Tennessee

    Tea Party members Potter, Proctor and Perkins discuss strategy as they wait for a committee meeting to start in Nashville, Tennessee

    Posted: 5/18/2012 6:39:20 AM EST
    Tea Party members Kurt Potter, Rachael Proctor and Mishelle Perkins (L-R) discuss strategy as they wait for a committee meeting to start in Nashville, Tennessee April 4, 2012. In 2010, Republicans wooed the Tea Party movement, promising them lower taxes and constitutionally limited government - where real power would devolve to the states and the federal government would be restricted to areas like national defense. In return, Tea Party activists helped Republicans expand majorities in red states like Tennessee and take the U.S. House of Representatives and 20 state legislative chambers around the country. These Republican majorities have pushed voter identification and anti-abortion bills, or followed Wisconsin's lead in curtailing public sector workers' collective bargaining rights. Picture taken April 4. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
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    Posted: 5/16/2012 12:35:46 PM EST
    In this image taken from a video made on Jan. 18, 2011 from 371 Productions, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker talks to one of his top donors, Beloit billionaire Diane Hendricks, right, at Beloit headquarters of ABC Supply, the roofing wholesaler and siding distributor Hendricks founded with her late husband, Ken. In the newly-released documentary film footage shows embattled Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, shortly after his election, describing a ?divide and conquer? strategy for taking on the state?s public employee unions by first going after their collective bargaining rights. (AP Photo/371 Productions)
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    Posted: 5/16/2012 12:35:46 PM EST
    Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks during a news conference at the Wisconsin Republican Party convention in Green Bay, Wis., on Friday, May 11, 2012. Newly released documentary film footage shows the embattled govenor shortly after his election describing a "divide and conquer" strategy for taking on unions by first going after public employees' collective bargaining rights. Walker said Friday that he has no desire to pursue right-to-work legislation and no such bill would pass the Legislature under his watch. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer)
  •  - Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig speaks at news conference to announce new collective bargaining agreement with players in New York

    Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig speaks at news conference to announce new collective bargaining agreement with players in New York

    Posted: 3/2/2012 3:39:53 PM EST
    Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig speaks at a news conference in New York, November 22, 2011, to announce a new five-year collective bargaining agreement with the players that will allow play to continue uninterrupted through the 2016 season. REUTERS/Mike Segar
  •  - Wisconsin State Governor Walker speaks after signing the ceremonial bill which eliminated almost all collective bargaining for most public workers, at the state Capitol in Madison

    Wisconsin State Governor Walker speaks after signing the ceremonial bill which eliminated almost all collective bargaining for most public workers, at the state Capitol in Madison

    Posted: 2/17/2012 5:38:48 PM EST
    Wisconsin State Governor Scott Walker speaks after signing the ceremonial bill, after the Republican-controlled House and Senate eliminated almost all collective bargaining for most public workers, at the state Capitol in Madison, Wisconsin March 11, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck
  •  - To go with Feature USA-CAMPAIGN/WISCONSIN

    To go with Feature USA-CAMPAIGN/WISCONSIN

    Posted: 2/16/2012 11:48:03 AM EST
    Crowds gather to see the 14 democratic senators that left the state to protest the bill proposed by Governor Scott Walker as crowds continue to protest at the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison, Wisconsin March 12, 2011. Political money has poured into Wisconsin in recent months - not for the presidential or Senate races but for a state vote getting national billing as a battle for the interests of the middle class. On one side are conservatives from across the country who back Republican Governor Scott Walker, a darling of the right since his 2011 crusade to rein in government spending by eliminating most collective bargaining rights for public employees. On the other are Democrats and union backers conducting a grassroots drive to collect more than a million signatures in a heated campaign to recall Walker. Photo taken March 12, 2011. To go with Feature USA-CAMPAIGN/WISCONSIN REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - To go with Feature USA-CAMPAIGN/WISCONSIN

    To go with Feature USA-CAMPAIGN/WISCONSIN

    Posted: 2/16/2012 11:47:37 AM EST
    Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker (L) presents U.S. President Barack Obama with a Milwaukee Brewers jersey upon his arrival in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in this file image from February 15, 2012. Political money has poured into Wisconsin in recent months - not for the presidential or Senate races but for a state vote getting national billing as a battle for the interests of the middle class. On one side are conservatives from across the country who back Republican Governor Scott Walker, a darling of the right since his 2011 crusade to rein in government spending by eliminating most collective bargaining rights for public employees. On the other are Democrats and union backers conducting a grassroots drive to collect more than a million signatures in a heated campaign to recall Walker. Photo taken February 15. To go with Feature USA-CAMPAIGN/WISCONSIN REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT BASEBALL POLITICS)