Cold War Photos on Townhall

  •  - Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad congratulates Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega after Ortega was sworn in for his second term as president at the Revolution Square in Managua

    Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad congratulates Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega after Ortega was sworn in for his second term as president at the Revolution Square in Managua

    Posted: 1/17/2012 2:39:01 PM EST
    Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (C) congratulates Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega after Ortega was sworn in for his second term as president at the Revolution Square in Managua January 10, 2012. Ortega has won over many critics at home with a successful drive to cut poverty and spur business-friendly policies in Central America's poorest country. But his choice of friends abroad makes many Nicaraguans worry that the former guerrilla and Cold War icon is dragging down the country's reputation and unnecessarily antagonizing the United States and other Western countries. Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez claps on the right. Picture taken January 10, 2012. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/9/2011 5:20:46 PM EST
    The Cuban Interests Section in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011. Washington and Cuba have had an icy relationship for decades, but the Cold War foes now have a place to share something else chilly: drinks. Last month, Cuban officials inaugurated an invitation-only bar at the mansion in northwest Washington where they have their offices. The bar is named after author Ernest Hemingway, who has strong ties to both countries. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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    Posted: 12/9/2011 5:20:46 PM EST
    The Cuban Interests Section in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011. Washington and Cuba have had an icy relationship for decades, but the Cold War foes now have a place to share something else chilly: drinks. Last month, Cuban officials inaugurated an invitation-only bar at the mansion in northwest Washington where they have their offices. The bar is named after author Ernest Hemingway, who has strong ties to both countries. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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    Posted: 11/2/2011 4:20:47 AM EST
    In this Friday, Nov. 5, 1971 file photo, a woman holds up Ping-Pong paddles with U.S. President Richard Nixon and Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong caricatures on them in Dortmund, Germany. Much has changed since the age of "ping pong diplomacy'' began when nine American players first looked across the net at Chinese opponents more than 40 years ago. The Cold War has been buried for two decades and China is now an economic powerhouse nipping at America's heels. And the Gulf state of Qatar _ an obscure patch of sand in 1971 _ is emerging as an international sports giant with the 2022 World Cup, another Olympic bid and a relentless appetite for headline-grabbing events, such as hosting an updated edition of table tennis-as-political icebreaker. (AP Photo, File)
  •  - Workers tool a B53 nuclear bomb at a nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Workers tool a B53 nuclear bomb at a nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 9:32:00 PM EST
    Workers tool a B53 nuclear bomb at a nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on April 15, 2010 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest B53 nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. The number of B53s that were once in service, and the number that have been disassembled, remains classified, but Joshua McConaha, Public Affairs Director for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, confirmed that Tuesday's bomb was the final one. Picture taken April 15, 2010. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR
  •  - An inspector examines the casings of a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    An inspector examines the casings of a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 9:14:21 PM EST
    An inspector examines the casings of a B53 nuclear bomb prior to loading at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on September 10, 2007 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest B53 nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. The number of B53s that were once in service, and the number that have been disassembled, remains classified, but Joshua McConaha, Public Affairs Director for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, confirmed that Tuesday's bomb was the final one. Picture taken September 10, 2007. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
  •  - The shredded remains of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    The shredded remains of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 9:10:47 PM EST
    The shredded remains of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on September 11, 2007 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest B53 nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. The number of B53s that were once in service, and the number that have been disassembled, remains classified, but Joshua McConaha, Public Affairs Director for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, confirmed that Tuesday's bomb was the final one. Picture taken September 11, 2007. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL
  •  - Workers examine a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo in handout photograph

    Workers examine a B53 nuclear bomb at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo in handout photograph

    Posted: 10/25/2011 7:58:10 PM EST
    Workers examine a B53 nuclear bomb at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on Tuesday as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Handout photo of parts of a B53 nuclear bomb prior to shredding at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Handout photo of parts of a B53 nuclear bomb prior to shredding at B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo

    Posted: 10/25/2011 7:54:32 PM EST
    Parts of a B53 nuclear bomb are pictured prior to shredding at the B&W Pantex nuclear weapons storage facility outside Amarillo, Texas, in this handout photograph taken on September 11, 2007 and released on October 25, 2011. The United States dismantled the oldest nuclear bomb in its Cold War arsenal -- and one of the most powerful it ever built -- on October 25, 2011 as part of President Barack Obama's nuclear security policy. Built at the height of the Cold War in 1962, the bomb was designed to be dropped onto a target by a massive B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber. Picture taken September 11, 2007. REUTERS/Photo Courtesy B&W Pantex/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Handout shows workers unloading a B53 bomb

    Handout shows workers unloading a B53 bomb

    Posted: 10/25/2011 6:50:26 AM EST
    Workers unload a B53 bomb in this handout taken February 14, 2011 and released October 20, 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will dismantle the last of the nation's strongest nuclear bombs in its weapons stockpile at the Pantex Plant near Amarillo on October 25, 2011, local media reported. The bomb was first put into service during the Cold War and is considered to be more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. REUTERS/National Nuclear Security Administration/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Handout shows a B53 bomb

    Handout shows a B53 bomb

    Posted: 10/25/2011 6:25:20 AM EST
    A B53 bomb is seen in this handout taken October 19, 2011 and released October 20, 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will dismantle the last of the nation's strongest nuclear bombs in its weapons stockpile at the Pantex Plant near Amarillo on October 25, 2011, local media reported. The bomb was first put into service during the Cold War and is considered to be more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. REUTERS/National Nuclear Security Administration/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - Handout shows production technicians conduct a training class on the B53 bomb

    Handout shows production technicians conduct a training class on the B53 bomb

    Posted: 10/25/2011 6:14:33 AM EST
    Production technicians conduct a training class on the B53 bomb in this handout taken October 19, 2011 and released October 20, 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will dismantle the last of the nation's strongest nuclear bombs in its weapons stockpile at the Pantex Plant near Amarillo on October 25, 2011, local media reported. The bomb was first put into service during the Cold War and is considered to be more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. REUTERS/National Nuclear Security Administration/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - The Soyuz VS01 rocket lifts off from Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    The Soyuz VS01 rocket lifts off from Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    Posted: 10/22/2011 10:32:05 AM EST
    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. Picture taken October 21. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE - S. Corvaja, 2011/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    Posted: 10/21/2011 2:41:29 PM EST
    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE/S. Corvaja/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    Posted: 10/21/2011 2:40:53 PM EST
    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE/S. Corvaja/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    Posted: 10/21/2011 2:40:05 PM EST
    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE/S. Corvaja/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    Posted: 10/21/2011 2:38:29 PM EST
    The Soyuz VS01 lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE/S. Corvaja/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - Handout photo of  Soyuz VS01 as it lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary,

    Handout photo of Soyuz VS01 as it lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary,

    Posted: 10/21/2011 2:36:53 PM EST
    The Soyuz VS01 as it lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE/S. Corvaja/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
  •  - An aerial view of the Soyuz VS01 rocket lift off from Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    An aerial view of the Soyuz VS01 rocket lift off from Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    Posted: 10/21/2011 11:26:17 AM EST
    An aerial view of the Soyuz VS01 as it lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. Picture taken October 21. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE - S. Corvaja, 2011/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
  •  - An aerial view of the Soyuz VS01 rocket lift off from Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    An aerial view of the Soyuz VS01 rocket lift off from Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary

    Posted: 10/21/2011 11:25:16 AM EST
    An aerial view of the Soyuz VS01 as it lifts off carrying the first two satellites in Europe's Galileo global positioning system, at the Guiana Space Center in Sinnamary, French Guiana in this October 21, 2011 handout photo. The launch was the first time that the Russian Soyuz, which first flew in 1966 and traces its roots back to the earliest Cold War intercontinental ballistic missiles, has taken off from outside its old Soviet Union bases. Picture taken October 21. REUTERS/ESA/CNES/ARIANESPACE - S. Corvaja, 2011/Handout (FRENCH GUIANA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS


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