Climate Change Photos on Townhall

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              FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012 file photo, conference flags are displayed ahead of the Doha Climate Change Conference, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012. The eighteenth

    FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012 file photo, conference flags are displayed ahead of the Doha Climate Change Conference, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012. The eighteenth

    Posted: 11/24/2012 2:08:59 PM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012 file photo, conference flags are displayed ahead of the Doha Climate Change Conference, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012. The eighteenth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 18) will take place from Monday, Nov. 26 to Friday, Dec. 6, 2012.(AP Photo/Osama Faisal, File)
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              In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012 photo, conference flags are displayed ahead of the Doha Climate Change Conference, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012. The eighteenth session of t

    In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012 photo, conference flags are displayed ahead of the Doha Climate Change Conference, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012. The eighteenth session of t

    Posted: 11/24/2012 6:18:28 AM EST
    In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012 photo, conference flags are displayed ahead of the Doha Climate Change Conference, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2012. The eighteenth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 18) will take place from Monday, Nov. 26 to Friday, Dec. 6, 2012.(AP Photo/Osama Faisal)
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              FILE - In this Dec. 16, 2009 file photo, steam and smoke rise from a coal burning power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. A United Nations report on rising greenhouse gas emissions remin

    FILE - In this Dec. 16, 2009 file photo, steam and smoke rise from a coal burning power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. A United Nations report on rising greenhouse gas emissions remin

    Posted: 11/21/2012 5:28:31 AM EST
    FILE - In this Dec. 16, 2009 file photo, steam and smoke rise from a coal burning power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. A United Nations report on rising greenhouse gas emissions reminded world governments Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012 that their efforts to fight climate change are far from enough to meet their stated goal of limiting global warming to 2 degrees C (3.6 F). (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
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              FILE - In this Wednesday, March 5, 2008 file photo, water levels at the Colorado River's Horseshoe Bend begin to rise along the beaches just hours after the Glen Canyon Dam jet tubes be

    FILE - In this Wednesday, March 5, 2008 file photo, water levels at the Colorado River's Horseshoe Bend begin to rise along the beaches just hours after the Glen Canyon Dam jet tubes be

    Posted: 11/20/2012 12:08:27 PM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, March 5, 2008 file photo, water levels at the Colorado River's Horseshoe Bend begin to rise along the beaches just hours after the Glen Canyon Dam jet tubes began releasing water, in Page, Ariz. Drought, climate change and an increasing population in the West are pushing the Colorado River basin toward deep trouble in the coming decades, scientists say. (AP Photo/Matt York)
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              FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2012 file photo New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg talks to traders at the New York Stock Exchange in New York. Bloombergbacked President Barack Obama over Re

    FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2012 file photo New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg talks to traders at the New York Stock Exchange in New York. Bloombergbacked President Barack Obama over Re

    Posted: 11/1/2012 3:53:37 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2012 file photo New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg talks to traders at the New York Stock Exchange in New York. Bloombergbacked President Barack Obama over Republican Mitt Romney on Thursday, saying the president will bring leadership critically needed to fight climate change in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
  •  - A woman walks past a homeless person's set-up outside the Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    A woman walks past a homeless person's set-up outside the Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    Posted: 10/22/2012 9:34:57 AM EST
    A woman walks past a homeless person's set-up outside the Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens October 16, 2012. Just when it seems things couldn't get any worse for Greece, this exhausted and indebted country has a new threat to deal with: mosquito-borne diseases. Species of the blood-sucking insects that can carry exotic-sounding tropical infections like malaria, West Nile Virus, chikungunya and dengue fever are enjoying the extra bit of warmth climate change is bringing to parts of southern Europe. And with austerity budgets, a collapsing health system, political infighting and rising xenophobia all conspiring to allow pest and disease control measures here to slip through the net, the mosquitoes are biting back. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis
  •  - A man sits on a bench next to a banner that reads "Health is bleeding" outside the Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    A man sits on a bench next to a banner that reads "Health is bleeding" outside the Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    Posted: 10/22/2012 9:34:57 AM EST
    A man sits on a bench next to a banner that reads "Health is bleeding" outside the Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens October 16, 2012. Just when it seems things couldn't get any worse for Greece, this exhausted and indebted country has a new threat to deal with: mosquito-borne diseases. Species of the blood-sucking insects that can carry exotic-sounding tropical infections like malaria, West Nile Virus, chikungunya and dengue fever are enjoying the extra bit of warmth climate change is bringing to parts of southern Europe. And with austerity budgets, a collapsing health system, political infighting and rising xenophobia all conspiring to allow pest and disease control measures here to slip through the net, the mosquitoes are biting back. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greek doctor Eleni Kakalou poses at an entrance of Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    Greek doctor Eleni Kakalou poses at an entrance of Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    Posted: 10/22/2012 9:30:20 AM EST
    Greek doctor Eleni Kakalou poses at an entrance of Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens October 16, 2012. Just when it seems things couldn't get any worse for Greece, this exhausted and indebted country has a new threat to deal with: mosquito-borne diseases. Species of the blood-sucking insects that can carry exotic-sounding tropical infections like malaria, West Nile Virus, chikungunya and dengue fever are enjoying the extra bit of warmth climate change is bringing to parts of southern Europe. And with austerity budgets, a collapsing health system, political infighting and rising xenophobia all conspiring to allow pest and disease control measures here to slip through the net, the mosquitoes are biting back. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis
  •  - Greek doctor Eleni Kakalou poses at an entrance of Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    Greek doctor Eleni Kakalou poses at an entrance of Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens

    Posted: 10/22/2012 9:30:20 AM EST
    Greek doctor Eleni Kakalou poses at an entrance of Evangelismos General Hospital in Athens October 16, 2012. Just when it seems things couldn't get any worse for Greece, this exhausted and indebted country has a new threat to deal with: mosquito-borne diseases. Species of the blood-sucking insects that can carry exotic-sounding tropical infections like malaria, West Nile Virus, chikungunya and dengue fever are enjoying the extra bit of warmth climate change is bringing to parts of southern Europe. And with austerity budgets, a collapsing health system, political infighting and rising xenophobia all conspiring to allow pest and disease control measures here to slip through the net, the mosquitoes are biting back. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis
  •  - A Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito on a human finger in this undated handout photo

    A Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito on a human finger in this undated handout photo

    Posted: 10/22/2012 9:30:20 AM EST
    A Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito on a human finger in this undated handout photograph from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Just when it seems things couldn't get any worse for Greece, this exhausted and indebted country has a new threat to deal with: mosquito-borne diseases. Species of the blood-sucking insects that can carry exotic-sounding tropical infections like malaria, West Nile Virus, chikungunya and dengue fever are enjoying the extra bit of warmth climate change is bringing to parts of southern Europe. And with austerity budgets, a collapsing health system, political infighting and rising xenophobia all conspiring to allow pest and disease control measures here to slip through the net, the mosquitoes are biting back. REUTERS/James Gathany/Center For Disease Control/Handout/Files
  •  - Mountain guide Zuniga holds fresh needles growing on a spruce tree that has a claim to being world's oldest tree at 9,550 years of age on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden

    Mountain guide Zuniga holds fresh needles growing on a spruce tree that has a claim to being world's oldest tree at 9,550 years of age on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden

    Posted: 10/19/2012 11:58:09 AM EST
    Mountain guide Eduardo Zuniga holds fresh needles growing on a spruce tree, that has a claim to being the world's oldest tree at 9,550 years of age, on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden, October 4, 2012. On a windswept Swedish mountain, a 10,000-year-old spruce with a claim to be the world's oldest tree is getting a new lease of life thanks to global warming, even as many plants are struggling. At a range of latitudes, but especially in the far north, climate change is bringing bigger than expected swings, putting billions of dollars at stake in a push to develop varieties with resilience to frost and heatwaves, drought or flood. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
  •  - Spruce tree heavily damaged by frosts and wind which also has a claim to being world's oldest tree of 9,500 years regenerates itself on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden

    Spruce tree heavily damaged by frosts and wind which also has a claim to being world's oldest tree of 9,500 years regenerates itself on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden

    Posted: 10/19/2012 11:58:09 AM EST
    A spruce tree heavily damaged by frosts and wind, which also has a claim to being the world's oldest tree of 9,500 years, regenerates itself on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden, October 4, 2012. On a windswept Swedish mountain, a 10,000-year-old spruce with a claim to be the world's oldest tree is getting a new lease of life thanks to global warming, even as many plants are struggling. At a range of latitudes, but especially in the far north, climate change is bringing bigger than expected swings, putting billions of dollars at stake in a push to develop varieties with resilience to frost and heatwaves, drought or flood. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
  •  - Trunk of a spruce heavily damaged by frosts and wind which also has a claim to being world's oldest tree of 9,500 years regenerates itself on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden

    Trunk of a spruce heavily damaged by frosts and wind which also has a claim to being world's oldest tree of 9,500 years regenerates itself on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden

    Posted: 10/19/2012 11:58:09 AM EST
    The trunk of a spruce heavily damaged by frosts and wind, which also has a claim to being the world's oldest tree of 9,500 years, regenerates itself on Fulufjallet plateau in southern Sweden, October 4, 2012. On a windswept Swedish mountain, a 10,000-year-old spruce with a claim to be the world's oldest tree is getting a new lease of life thanks to global warming, even as many plants are struggling. At a range of latitudes, but especially in the far north, climate change is bringing bigger than expected swings, putting billions of dollars at stake in a push to develop varieties with resilience to frost and heatwaves, drought or flood. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
  •  - Mountain guide Zuniga stands by an ancient spruce in Fulufjallet, southern Sweden

    Mountain guide Zuniga stands by an ancient spruce in Fulufjallet, southern Sweden

    Posted: 10/19/2012 11:58:09 AM EST
    Mountain guide Eduardo Zuniga stands by an ancient spruce in Fulufjallet, southern Sweden, October 4, 2012. On a windswept Swedish mountain, a 10,000-year-old spruce with a claim to be the world's oldest tree is getting a new lease of life thanks to global warming, even as many plants are struggling. At a range of latitudes, but especially in the far north, climate change is bringing bigger than expected swings, putting billions of dollars at stake in a push to develop varieties with resilience to frost and heatwaves, drought or flood. REUTERS/Alister Doyle
  •  - Computer models used to forecast climate change on Earth have been validated on Mars, astronomers reported on October 16,

    Computer models used to forecast climate change on Earth have been validated on Mars, astronomers reported on October 16,

    Posted: 10/16/2012 4:22:26 PM EST
    In this undated orbital photos from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, this closeup view shows chevron texture on riverbed floor, indicating how the ice-rich material flowed fastest in the middle and was retarded along the channel walls. REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Handout
  •  - Computer models used to forecast climate change on Earth have been validated on Mars, astronomers reported on October 16,

    Computer models used to forecast climate change on Earth have been validated on Mars, astronomers reported on October 16,

    Posted: 10/16/2012 4:22:26 PM EST
    In this undated orbital photos from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, this closeup view shows chevron texture on riverbed floor, indicating how the ice-rich material flowed fastest in the middle and was retarded along the channel walls. REUTERS/NASA/JPL/Handout
  •  - Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC Christiana Figueres speaks during a news conference at the Conference of the Parties (COP17) of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Durban

    Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC Christiana Figueres speaks during a news conference at the Conference of the Parties (COP17) of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Durban

    Posted: 10/2/2012 4:04:24 AM EST
    Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Christiana Figueres speaks during a news conference at the Conference of the Parties (COP17) of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Durban, November 28, 2011. REUTERS/Rogan Ward
  •  - Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC Christiana Figueres speaks during a news conference at the Conference of the Parties (COP17) of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Durban

    Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC Christiana Figueres speaks during a news conference at the Conference of the Parties (COP17) of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Durban

    Posted: 10/2/2012 4:04:24 AM EST
    Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Christiana Figueres speaks during a news conference at the Conference of the Parties (COP17) of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Durban, November 28, 2011. REUTERS/Rogan Ward
  •  - Damage to Beaver Reef by Cyclone Hamish is seen in this undated handout photo

    Damage to Beaver Reef by Cyclone Hamish is seen in this undated handout photo

    Posted: 10/1/2012 9:31:36 PM EST
    The damage to Beaver Reef by Cyclone Hamish is seen in this undated handout photo released on October 2, 2012. The world's largest coral reef - under threat from Australia's surging coal and gas shipments, climate change and a destructive starfish - is declining faster than ever and coral cover could fall to just 5 percent in the next decade, a study shows. Researchers from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) in the northeastern city of Townsville say Australia's Great Barrier Reef has lost half of its coral in little more than a generation. And the pace of damage has picked up since 2006. REUTERS/Australian Institute of Marine Science/AIMS Long-term Monitoring Team/Handout
  •  - Population outbreak of the coral eating starfish Acanthaster planci on the Great Barrier Reef is seen in this undated handout photo

    Population outbreak of the coral eating starfish Acanthaster planci on the Great Barrier Reef is seen in this undated handout photo

    Posted: 10/1/2012 9:31:36 PM EST
    The population outbreak of the coral eating starfish Acanthaster planci on the Great Barrier Reef is seen in this undated handout photo released on October 2, 2012. The world's largest coral reef - under threat from Australia's surging coal and gas shipments, climate change and a destructive starfish - is declining faster than ever and coral cover could fall to just 5 percent in the next decade, a study shows. Researchers from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) in the northeastern city of Townsville say Australia's Great Barrier Reef has lost half of its coral in little more than a generation. And the pace of damage has picked up since 2006. REUTERS/Katharina Fabricius/Australian Institute of Marine Science/Handout