Civil Liberties Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 8/24/2011 7:20:55 PM EST
    American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) attorney Michael Risher speaks to the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) agency board of directors at BART headquarters in Oakland, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011, during a public meeting about a possible policy allowing police to turn off wireless communications on train platforms. BART ignited a global debate over free speech when it cut cellphone and wireless data service in San Francisco subway stations earlier this month to disrupt plans for a protest. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
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    Posted: 8/24/2011 5:15:46 AM EST
    Pedestrians start their morning under the watchful eyes of surveillance cameras in Times Square in New York, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2011. Since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the New York Police Department has become one of the country's most aggressive domestic intelligence agencies, one that operates far outside its borders and targets ethnic communities in ways that would run afoul of civil liberties rules if practiced by the federal government. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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    Posted: 7/28/2011 4:40:55 PM EST
    Lord Justice Leveson, centre, and the assessors of his inquiry into culture practices and ethics of the press, from left, George Jones, Shami Chakrabarti, David Bell, David Currie, Paul Scott-Lee and Elinor Goodman, attend the openiong of the inquiry in London, Thursday July 28, 2011. Justice Brian Leveson said he has the legal power to demand evidence from witnesses - and plans to use it "as soon as possible." The inquiry was announced earlier this month by Prime Minister David Cameron in the wake of a scandal over illegal eavesdropping that has closed down the 168-year-old News of the World tabloid and shaken Rupert Murdoch's global media empire. Leveson's 7-member panel includes a veteran newspaper reporter, a former police chief, a civil liberties activist and a broadcast journalist, and they will begin public hearings in September. (AP Photo/Sean Dempsey, pool)
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    Posted: 7/28/2011 4:40:54 PM EST
    Lord Justice Leveson speaks during the first formal session of his phone hacking inquiry in London, Thursday July 28, 2011. Justice Brian Leveson said he has the legal power to demand evidence from witnesses - and plans to use it "as soon as possible." The inquiry was announced earlier this month by Prime Minister David Cameron in the wake of a scandal over illegal eavesdropping that has closed down the 168-year-old News of the World tabloid and shaken Rupert Murdoch's global media empire. Leveson's 7-member panel includes a veteran newspaper reporter, a former police chief, a civil liberties activist and a broadcast journalist, and they will begin public hearings in September. (AP Photo/Sean Dempsey, pool)
  •  - Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre

    Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre

    Posted: 7/22/2011 3:28:50 AM EST
    Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre, July 20, 2011. Riots broke out in several cities in Malawi on Wednesday after police tried to disperse protesters demanding the resignation of President Bingu wa Mutharika, whom they accuse of ignoring civil liberties and trashing the economy. REUTERS/Eldson Chagara
  •  - Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre

    Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre

    Posted: 7/20/2011 12:20:27 PM EST
    Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre, July 20, 2011. Riots broke out in several cities in Malawi on Wednesday after police tried to disperse protesters demanding the resignation of President Bingu wa Mutharika, whom they accuse of ignoring civil liberties and trashing the economy. REUTERS/Eldson Chagara (MALAWI - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre

    Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre

    Posted: 7/20/2011 12:15:01 PM EST
    Protestors take to the streets of Malawi's commercial capital Blantyre, July 20, 2011. Riots broke out in several cities in Malawi on Wednesday after police tried to disperse protesters demanding the resignation of President Bingu wa Mutharika, whom they accuse of ignoring civil liberties and trashing the economy. REUTERS/Eldson Chagara (MALAWI - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
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    Posted: 7/3/2011 1:51:00 AM EST
    FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2010, file photo Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is photographed in her chambers in Washington. Before becoming the second female justice on the nation's high court in 1993, Ginsburg had been a judge, a professor and a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, who focused on gender equality. She has said gracefully, and with apparent good humor, that the president should not expect a retirement letter from her before 2015. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
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    Posted: 7/3/2011 1:51:00 AM EST
    FILE - In this June 21, 2011, file photo Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg walks off stage after receiving a Jefferson Award for Public Service in Washington. Before becoming the second female justice on the nation's high court in 1993, Ginsburg had been a judge, a professor and a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, who focused on gender equality. She has said gracefully, and with apparent good humor, that the president should not expect a retirement letter from her before 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
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    Posted: 6/22/2011 2:26:38 PM EST
    Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks after being awarded a Jefferson Award for Public Service in Washington, Tuesday, June 21, 2011. Ginsburg is being honored for her legal career. Before she became the second female justice on the nation's high court in 1993, she was a judge, a professor and a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, where her work focused on gender equality. The awards, now in their 39th year, were co-founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and are named for founding father Thomas Jefferson. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 6/22/2011 2:26:34 PM EST
    Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg walks off stage after receiving a Jefferson Award for Public Service in Washington, Tuesday, June 21, 2011. Ginsburg is being honored for her legal career. Before she became the second female justice on the nation's high court in 1993, she was a judge, a professor and a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, where her work focused on gender equality. The awards, now in their 39th year, were co-founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and are named for founding father Thomas Jefferson. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 6/22/2011 2:26:10 PM EST
    Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg makes remarks after being awarded a Jefferson Awards for Public Service at the National Building Museum in Washington, Tuesday, June 21, 2011. Ginsburg is being honored for her legal career. Before she became the second female justice on the nation's high court in 1993, she was a judge, a professor and a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, where her work focused on gender equality. The awards, now in their 39th year, were co-founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and are named for founding father Thomas Jefferson. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
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    Posted: 6/16/2011 2:37:28 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 25, 2007 file photo, U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., questions former Environmental Protection Agency head Christine Whitman on Capitol Hill in Washington, during the House Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties subcommittee hearing on the federal environmental response at Ground Zero following the 9/11 attacks in New York City. Weiner has decided to resign his seat in Congress after a two-week scandal spawned by lewd and even x-rated photos the New York lawmaker took of himself and sent online to numerous women, Democratic officials said Thursday, June 16, 2011. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
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    Posted: 6/12/2011 12:07:01 AM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010 file picture, Westboro Baptist Church member Jacob Phelps of Topeka, Kan. holds signs in front of the Supreme Court in Washington as the court heard arguments in the dispute between Albert Snyder of York, Pa., and members of the Westboro Baptist Church. The case pits Snyder's right to grieve privately against the church members' right to say what they want, no matter how offensive. The American Civil Liberties Union's national gay rights project battles aggressively against anti-gay discrimination, but, as a longtime defender of free speech, the ACLU also is expected to intervene sometimes on behalf of anti-gay expression. The ACLU pressed a lawsuit on behalf of the fundamentalist Westboro Baptist Church, which has outraged mourning communities by picketing service members' funerals with crudely worded signs condemning homosexuality. The ACLU said the Missouri state law banning such picketing infringes on religious freedom and free speech. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
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    Posted: 5/26/2011 4:16:07 PM EST
    This April 2006 picture made available by Jessica Kenyon shows her at her graduation ceremony at Fort Eustis, Va. after completing the Army's Advanced Individual Training program. Though rape is a pervasive problem in the U.S. military, its health plan doesn't cover abortions for victims who become pregnant _ a policy that indignant critics are now pushing to change. The campaigners include members of Congress, the American Civil Liberties Union, and veterans such as Kenyon, whose says her Army career derailed after she was raped and impregnated by a fellow soldier while serving in South Korea in 2006. (AP Photo/Jessica Kenyon)
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    Posted: 5/10/2011 7:26:11 PM EST
    FILE - In this June 30, 2006 photo, U.S. Air Force Reservist Major Margaret Witt talks with reporters after a hearing of a case challenging her dismissal from the Air Force for being a Lesbian in U.S District Court in Tacoma, Wash. Witt is retiring with full benefits rather than resuming service during a announcement on Tuesday, May 10, 2011 at an American Civil Liberties Union news conference in Seattle. A federal judge ruled last fall that Witt's dismissal violated her constitutional rights. The judge ordered that she be reinstated. Her lawyers and the government spent several months negotiating her reinstatement before finally reaching an agreement to let her retire. Her discharge will be erased from her records. Witt was dismissed in 2006 after serving 18 years. She now works as a rehabilitation coordinator at the VA hospital in Spokane.(AP Photo/John Froschauer)
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    Posted: 5/9/2011 4:56:07 PM EST
    Thomas Perez, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division, center, talks about a federal investigation of the Newark Police Department during a news conference, Monday, May 9, 2011 in Newark, N.J. Standing with him are, from left, Newark Mayor Cory Booker, U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey Paul J. Fishman, Newark Police Director Garry McCarthy and Acting Newark Police Director Sam DeMaio. The Department of Justice on Monday announced an investigation into the policies and practices of the police department of New Jersey's largest city. The move comes months after the state American Civil Liberties Union complained of rampant misconduct and lax internal oversight at the Newark Police Department, although federal and city officials insisted that the ACLU's petition wasn't the main reason for the probe. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
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    Posted: 5/9/2011 4:56:07 PM EST
    Newark Mayor Cory Booker, left, talks about the start of a federal investigation of the Newark Police Department during a news conference as he stands next to Newark Police Director Garry McCarthy, center, and Acting Newark Police Director Sam DeMaio Monday, May 9, 2011 in Newark, N.J. The Department of Justice on Monday announced an investigation into the policies and practices of the police department of New Jersey's largest city. The move comes months after the state American Civil Liberties Union complained of rampant misconduct and lax internal oversight at the Newark Police Department, although federal and city officials insisted that the ACLU's petition wasn't the main reason for the probe. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
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    Posted: 5/9/2011 4:56:01 PM EST
    U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey Paul J. Fishman, center, speaks about a federal investigation of the Newark Police Department during a news conference Monday, May 9, 2011 in Newark, N.J. Also in attendance were, from left, Newark Mayor Cory Booker, Assistant US Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division Thomas Perez, Newark Police Director Garry McCarthy and Acting Newark Police Director Sam DeMaio. The Department of Justice on Monday announced an investigation into the policies and practices of the police department of New Jersey's largest city. The move comes months after the state American Civil Liberties Union complained of rampant misconduct and lax internal oversight at the Newark Police Department, although federal and city officials insisted that the ACLU's petition wasn't the main reason for the probe. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  •  - Britain's Deputy Prime Minster Nick Clegg speaks at The  Institute for Government in London

    Britain's Deputy Prime Minster Nick Clegg speaks at The Institute for Government in London

    Posted: 1/7/2011 7:48:40 AM EST
    Britain's Deputy Prime Minster Nick Clegg speaks on the subject of civil liberties at The Institute for Government in London January 7, 2011. REUTERS/Peter Macdiarmid/POOL (BRITAIN - Tags: POLITICS)