Censorship Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 3/8/2012 4:30:45 AM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, March 7, 2012, people use the Internet at a local cafe in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan wants to install an Internet filtering system capable of blocking 50 million Web pages - and doesn't mind advertising the fact. The plan is alarming free speech activists who fear current censorship could become much more widespread. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)
  •  - Broadcaster Kandelaki gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow

    Broadcaster Kandelaki gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow

    Posted: 3/1/2012 1:50:07 AM EST
    Broadcaster Tina Kandelaki gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow February 9, 2012. Many believe the genie of media freedom is, slowly, pushing its way out of the bottle in Russia, notably since street protests began against the expected return of Vladimir Putin to the presidency at an election on March 4, 2012. Kandelaki told Reuters that it would get harder for the state to tighten controls further as Russians become better informed and better equipped to track censorship and draw it to others' attention on the Internet. Picture taken February 9, 2012. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov (RUSSIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS BUSINESS MEDIA)
  •  - Broadcaster Kandelaki speaks during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow

    Broadcaster Kandelaki speaks during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow

    Posted: 3/1/2012 1:47:53 AM EST
    Broadcaster Tina Kandelaki speaks during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow February 9, 2012. Many believe the genie of media freedom is, slowly, pushing its way out of the bottle in Russia, notably since street protests began against the expected return of Vladimir Putin to the presidency at an election on March 4, 2012. Kandelaki told Reuters that it would get harder for the state to tighten controls further as Russians become better informed and better equipped to track censorship and draw it to others' attention on the Internet. Picture taken February 9, 2012. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov (RUSSIA - Tags: PROFILE POLITICS MEDIA ELECTIONS)
  •  - Broadcaster Kandelaki gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow

    Broadcaster Kandelaki gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow

    Posted: 3/1/2012 1:46:36 AM EST
    Broadcaster Tina Kandelaki gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in Moscow February 9, 2012. Many believe the genie of media freedom is, slowly, pushing its way out of the bottle in Russia, notably since street protests began against the expected return of Vladimir Putin to the presidency at an election on March 4, 2012. Kandelaki told Reuters that it would get harder for the state to tighten controls further as Russians become better informed and better equipped to track censorship and draw it to others' attention on the Internet. Picture taken February 9, 2012. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov (RUSSIA - Tags: PROFILE HEADSHOT MEDIA POLITICS ELECTIONS)
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    Posted: 2/28/2012 12:05:59 PM EST
    People read weekly journals to buy at a roadside shop in Yangon, Myanmar, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012. Newspaper articles that would have been rejected by Myanmar's draconian state censors just months ago are making it into print, in one of many signs that the long-repressed country is becoming more open. Though censorship persists, especially on political issues, the government is allowing many stories to be published without prior review, and journalists who were once jailed, beaten or blacklisted are testing the new boundaries. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)
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    Posted: 2/28/2012 12:05:59 PM EST
    People read weekly journals to buy at a roadside shop in Yangon, Myanmar, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012. Newspaper articles that would have been rejected by Myanmar's draconian state censors just months ago are making it into print, in one of many signs that the long-repressed country is becoming more open. Though censorship persists, especially on political issues, the government is allowing many stories to be published without prior review, and journalists who were once jailed, beaten or blacklisted are testing the new boundaries. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)
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    Posted: 2/28/2012 12:05:59 PM EST
    A Buddhist monk reads a journal at a roadside shop in Yangon, Myanmar, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012. Newspaper articles that would have been rejected by Myanmar's draconian state censors just months ago are making it into print, in one of many signs that the long-repressed country is becoming more open. Though censorship persists, especially on political issues, the government is allowing many stories to be published without prior review, and journalists who were once jailed, beaten or blacklisted are testing the new boundaries. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)
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    Posted: 2/18/2012 2:00:47 PM EST
    Protesters shout slogans during a protest against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA, in Sofia, Saturday, Feb 11, 2012. Protesters gathered in several European cities Saturday to voice anger at an international copyright treaty that they fear will lead to censorship on the Internet. (AP Photo/Valentina Petrova)
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    Posted: 2/18/2012 2:00:46 PM EST
    A man wearing a Guy Fawkes mask makes photos during a protest against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA, in front of the Presidential Palace in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012. People are gathering in many European cities to voice their anger at the international copyright treaty that they fear will lead to censorship on the Internet. Several European countries have signed the ACTA, but ratification remains in question now amid a groundswell of anger toward it, mostly by young people. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)
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    Posted: 2/18/2012 2:00:46 PM EST
    A protester shouts slogans during a demonstration againt the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA, in front of the Presidential Palace in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012. People are gathering in many European cities to voice their anger at the international copyright treaty that they fear will lead to censorship on the Internet. Several European countries have signed the ACTA, but ratification remains in question now amid a groundswell of anger toward it, mostly by young people. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)
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    Posted: 2/18/2012 2:00:46 PM EST
    A protester takes a hot drink during a demonstration against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA, in front of the Presidential Palace in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012. People are gathering in many European cities to voice their anger at the international copyright treaty that they fear will lead to censorship on the Internet. Several European countries have signed the ACTA, but ratification remains in question now amid a groundswell of anger toward it, mostly by young people. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
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    Posted: 2/18/2012 2:00:46 PM EST
    Protesters discuss as they demonstrate against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA, in front of the Presidential Palace in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012. People are gathering in many European cities to voice their anger at the international copyright treaty that they fear will lead to censorship on the Internet. Several European countries have signed the ACTA, but ratification remains in question now amid a groundswell of anger toward it, mostly by young people. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
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    Posted: 1/28/2012 12:25:47 AM EST
    This screen shot shows a portion of the Twitter blog post of Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012, in which the company announced it has refined its technology so it can censor messages on a country-by-country basis. The additional flexibility is likely to raise fears that Twitter's commitment to free speech may be weakening as the short-messaging company expands into new countries in an attempt to broaden its audience and make more money. But Twitter sees the censorship tool as a way to ensure individual messages, or "tweets," remain available to as many people as possible while it navigates a gauntlet of different laws around the world. (AP Photo/Twitter)
  •  - Protestors carry a placard reading "Freedom for Bradley Manning and exposing crimes is not a crime" during a demonstration in Frankfurt

    Protestors carry a placard reading "Freedom for Bradley Manning and exposing crimes is not a crime" during a demonstration in Frankfurt

    Posted: 1/21/2012 8:48:00 AM EST
    Protestors carry a placard reading "Freedom for Bradley Manning and exposing crimes is not a crime" during a demonstration in Frankfurt, January 21, 2012. About 200 people took part in a demonstration for jailed U.S. soldier Bradley Manning and against censorship of internet content. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
  •  - Two protestors wait for the start of a demonstration in front of Frankfurt's main train station

    Two protestors wait for the start of a demonstration in front of Frankfurt's main train station

    Posted: 1/21/2012 8:38:19 AM EST
    Two protestors wait for the start of a demonstration in front of Frankfurt's main train station, January 21, 2012. About 200 people took part in a demonstration for jailed U.S. soldier Bradley Manning and against censorship of internet content. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
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    Posted: 12/16/2011 2:40:45 PM EST
    Hungarian TV journalist Aranka Szavuly, left, pours tea for her colleague Balazs Nagy Navarro, right, while both union officials are holding a hunger strike in front of Hungary?s public broadcasting headquarters in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, Dec. 16, 2011. Three Hungarian television employees are holding a hunger strike seeking the dismissal of managers they say are responsible for censorship and restricting news coverage in state-owned media. On Thursday, the director of Hungary's state news service was fired and the editor-in-chief reassigned due to the censorship of images in a newscast of a former head of Hungary's Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)
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    Posted: 12/16/2011 2:40:45 PM EST
    Hungarian TV journalists, Aranka Szavuly, right, and Balazs Nagy Navarro talk to each others while both union officials are holding a hunger strike in front of Hungary?s public broadcasting headquarters in Budapest, Hungary, Friday, Dec. 16, 2011. Three Hungarian television employees are holding a hunger strike seeking the dismissal of managers they say are responsible for censorship and restricting news coverage in state-owned media. On Thursday, the director of Hungary's state news service was fired and the editor-in-chief reassigned due to the censorship of images in a newscast of a former head of Hungary's Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Bela Szandelszky)
  •  - Activists from Shaheed Bhagat Singh Kranti Sena hold placards as they are detained by police during a protest in New Delhi

    Activists from Shaheed Bhagat Singh Kranti Sena hold placards as they are detained by police during a protest in New Delhi

    Posted: 12/7/2011 7:37:09 AM EST
    Activists from Shaheed Bhagat Singh Kranti Sena, a Hindu group, hold placards as they are detained by police during a protest outside the residence of India's Telecoms and Information Technology Minister Kapil Sibal, in New Delhi December 7, 2011. India has urged social network companies including Facebook, Twitter and Google to remove offensive material, unleashing a storm of criticism from Internet users complaining of censorship in the world's largest democracy. Sibal met executives from Facebook, Google, Yahoo and Microsoft on Monday to ask them to screen content, but no agreement with the companies was reached, he said. REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS RELIGION BUSINESS)
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    Posted: 12/1/2011 12:25:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 file photo, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, right, speaks to Chechen regional President Ramzan Kadyrov, left, in Grozny, Chechnya. Censorship across time zones has become an established practice on Russia's national television networks, which under Putin were all brought under Kremlin control. Controversial or sensitive programs are shown in full to audiences in the Far East, Siberia and the Urals, but are often edited before they reach viewers in Russia's western regions, where 70 percent of the population lives. Sometimes, the programs are canceled altogether. (AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Alexei Nikolsky, Pool-File)
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    Posted: 12/1/2011 12:25:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011 file photo, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, left, visits Ostankono TV Center in Moscow, as Russian television Channel One director Konstantin Ernst, right, and his deputy Kirill Kleymenov, second right, explain procedures. Censorship across time zones has become an established practice on Russia's national television networks, which under Putin were all brought under Kremlin control. Controversial or sensitive programs are shown in full to audiences in the Far East, Siberia and the Urals, but are often edited before they reach viewers in Russia's western regions, where 70 percent of the population lives. Sometimes, the programs are canceled altogether. (AP Photo/RIA Novosti, Alexei Druzhinin, Pool-File)