Censorship Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 5/8/2012 11:20:47 PM EST
    Julia Kennedy Cochran, daughter of former AP correspondent Ed Kennedy, addresses the audience at Associated Press Headquarters in New York during a panel discussion entitled ?Ed Kennedy?s War: V-E Day, Censorship and The Associated Press,? Tuesday, May 8, 2012. Edward Kennedy was fired by the AP after he became the first journalist to send a firsthand account of the German surrender in 1945. It had already been reported on the radio in Europe. Kennedy defied officials who told journalists to keep it secret for 36 hours as a condition of witnessing it. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 11:20:47 PM EST
    Associated Press President and Chief Executive Officer Tom Curley introduces the panel for a discussion entitled ?Ed Kennedy's War: V-E Day, Censorship and The Associated Press,? at Associated Press Headquarters in New York, Wednesday, May 8, 2012. Curley has apologized for the agency's decision to fire Ed Kennedy, the correspondent who was dismissed by the AP after he defied military censors and became the first journalist to send a firsthand account of the German surrender in 1945. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 11:20:47 PM EST
    Associated Press President and Chief Executive Officer Tom Curley, left, addresses the audience during an panel discussion entitled ?Ed Kennedy?s War: V-E Day, Censorship and The Associated Press,? at Associated Press Headquarters, Tuesday, May 8, 2012 in New York. Edward Kennedy was fired by the AP after he became the first journalist to send a firsthand account of the German surrender in 1945. It had already been reported on the radio in Europe. Kennedy defied officials who told journalists to keep it secret for 36 hours as a condition of witnessing it. Seated from second left are moderator Jack Hamilton, panelists John Darnton, George Bria, Richard Fine and Sally Buzbee. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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    Posted: 5/8/2012 11:20:47 PM EST
    Moderator Jack Hamilton, left, addresses the audience as fellow panelists listen during a panel discussion entitled Ed Kennedy?s War: V-E Day, Censorship and The Associated Press,? Tuesday, May 8, 2012 at Associated Press Headquarters in New York. Edward Kennedy was fired by the AP after he became the first journalist to send a firsthand account of the German surrender in 1945. It had already been reported on the radio in Europe. Kennedy defied officials who told journalists to keep it secret for 36 hours as a condition of witnessing it. Seated from second left are panelists John Darnton, George Bria, Richard Fine and Sally Buzbee. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 5:35:47 PM EST
    In this April 25, 2012, photo, Tom Curley, President and CEO of The Associated Press, discusses the work of former AP correspondent Ed Kennedy during an interview in New York. Curley co-wrote the introduction to the book, ?Ed Kennedy?s War: V-E Day, Censorship & The Associated Press.? (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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    Posted: 5/4/2012 5:35:47 PM EST
    In this April 25, 2012, photo, Tom Curley, President and CEO of The Associated Press, discusses the work of former AP correspondent Ed Kennedy during an interview in New York. Curley co-wrote the introduction to the book, ?Ed Kennedy?s War: V-E Day, Censorship & The Associated Press.? (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  •  - A man spray-paints graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest in Lebanon

    A man spray-paints graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest in Lebanon

    Posted: 5/1/2012 4:20:49 PM EST
    A man spray-paints graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest calling on freedom of expression and speech and against the media censorship in Lebanon May 1, 2012. REUTERS/Sharif Karim (LEBANON - Tags: CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - A man spray-paints graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest in Lebanon

    A man spray-paints graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest in Lebanon

    Posted: 5/1/2012 4:20:11 PM EST
    A man spray-paints graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest calling on freedom of expression and speech and against the media censorship in Lebanon May 1, 2012. REUTERS/Sharif Karim (LEBANON - Tags: CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - A policeman looks at graffiti made by protesters on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest in Lebanon

    A policeman looks at graffiti made by protesters on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest in Lebanon

    Posted: 5/1/2012 4:17:20 PM EST
    A policeman looks at graffiti made by protesters on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest calling on freedom of expression and speech and against the media censorship in Lebanon May 1, 2012. REUTERS/Sharif Karim (LEBANON - Tags: CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Lebanese artist and poet Semaan Khawam, sprays graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest  in Lebanon

    Lebanese artist and poet Semaan Khawam, sprays graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest in Lebanon

    Posted: 5/1/2012 4:15:55 PM EST
    Lebanese artist and poet Semaan Khawam, sprays graffiti on a wall at Hamra street in Beirut, during a protest calling on freedom of expression and speech and against the media censorship in Lebanon May 1, 2012. Khawam was charged in February when police found him having spray-painted graffiti of an army soldier holding a gun. Khodr Salameh and Ali Fakhry were released last month from jail who were also arrested for spraying painting in Beirut. REUTERS/Sharif Karim (LEBANON - Tags: CIVIL UNREST)
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    Posted: 5/1/2012 1:25:46 PM EST
    In this photo taken April 3, 2012, Myanmar filmmaker Htun Zaw Win poses outside his office in Yangon, Myanmar. When Htun Zaw Win decided to make a short comedy about the tragically bizarre process of getting movies made in his oppressed homeland, he knew exactly what to base it on: Real life. "Ban That Scene!" makes a daring mockery of this country's dreaded film censorship board, whose members are cast as comical guardians of a tyrannical state's idealized image of itself. (AP Photo)
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    Posted: 5/1/2012 1:25:46 PM EST
    In this photo taken April 3, 2012, Myanmar filmmaker Htun Zaw Win poses outside his office in Yangon, Myanmar. When Htun Zaw Win decided to make a short comedy about the tragically bizarre process of getting movies made in his oppressed homeland, he knew exactly what to base it on: Real life. "Ban That Scene!" makes a daring mockery of this country's dreaded film censorship board, whose members are cast as comical guardians of a tyrannical state's idealized image of itself. (AP Photo)
  •  - To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    Posted: 4/22/2012 8:12:30 AM EST
    Canadian film director James Cameron gestures as he speaks during an interview with Reuters at a hotel room in Beijing, April 22, 2012. Cameron said on Sunday that he was looking at co-production of films in China, but would have to weigh issues like censorship and other restrictions before making any decisions. To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/ REUTERS/Barry Huang (CHINA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS)
  •  - To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    Posted: 4/22/2012 8:11:29 AM EST
    Canadian film director James Cameron talks to journalists before an interview with Reuters at a hotel room in Beijing, April 22, 2012. Cameron said on Sunday that he was looking at co-production of films in China, but would have to weigh issues like censorship and other restrictions before making any decisions. To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/ REUTERS/Barry Huang (CHINA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS)
  •  - To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    Posted: 4/22/2012 8:10:04 AM EST
    Canadian film director James Cameron listens to a question during an interview with Reuters at a hotel room in Beijing, April 22, 2012. Cameron said on Sunday that he was looking at co-production of films in China, but would have to weigh issues like censorship and other restrictions before making any decisions. To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/ REUTERS/Barry Huang (CHINA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT HEADSHOT POLITICS)
  •  - To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/

    Posted: 4/22/2012 8:08:17 AM EST
    Canadian film director James Cameron gestures as he speaks during an interview with Reuters at a hotel room in Beijing, April 22, 2012. Cameron said on Sunday that he was looking at co-production of films in China, but would have to weigh issues like censorship and other restrictions before making any decisions. To match Interview CHINA-JAMESCAMERON/ REUTERS/Barry Huang (CHINA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT POLITICS)
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    Posted: 4/4/2012 11:15:47 AM EST
    Director of "Shakespeare Must Die" Ing Kanjanavanit speaks during an interview in Bangkok, Thailand, on Wednesday, April 4, 2012. Thai film censorship board banned an adaptation of Shakespeare's "Macbeth," saying it could inflame political passions in the country where it is taboo to criticize the monarchy. The Thai-language film "Shakespeare Must Die" is about a theater group in a fictional country resembling Thailand that is staging a production of "Macbeth," in which an ambitious general murders his way to the Scottish throne. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
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    Posted: 4/4/2012 11:15:46 AM EST
    Director of "Shakespeare Must Die" Ing Kanjanavanit shows a DVD sent to Thai film censorship board in Bangkok, Thailand, during an interview on Wednesday, April 4, 2012. The censors banned an adaptation of Shakespeare's "Macbeth," saying it could inflame political passions in the country where it is taboo to criticize the monarchy. The Thai-language film "Shakespeare Must Die" is about a theater group in a fictional country resembling Thailand that is staging a production of "Macbeth," in which an ambitious general murders his way to the Scottish throne. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
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    Posted: 3/8/2012 4:30:45 AM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, March 7, 2012, people use the Internet at a local cafe in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan wants to install an Internet filtering system capable of blocking 50 million Web pages - and doesn't mind advertising the fact. The plan is alarming free speech activists who fear current censorship could become much more widespread. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)
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    Posted: 3/8/2012 4:30:45 AM EST
    In this photo taken Wednesday, March 7, 2012, people use the Internet at a local cafe in Islamabad, Pakistan. Pakistan wants to install an Internet filtering system capable of blocking 50 million Web pages - and doesn't mind advertising the fact. The plan is alarming free speech activists who fear current censorship could become much more widespread. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)


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