Censorship Photos on Townhall

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              U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech in Yangon University's Convocation Hall, in Yangon, Myanmar, Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. "Instead of being repressed, the right of people to ass

    U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech in Yangon University's Convocation Hall, in Yangon, Myanmar, Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. "Instead of being repressed, the right of people to ass

    Posted: 11/19/2012 9:13:30 AM EST
    U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech in Yangon University's Convocation Hall, in Yangon, Myanmar, Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. "Instead of being repressed, the right of people to assemble together must now be fully respected," the president said in speech excerpts released by the White House. "Instead of being stifled, the veil of media censorship must continue to be lifted. As you take these steps, you can draw on your progress." (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)
  •  - Journalists are seen at work as they protest against media censorship during a parliament session in Kiev

    Journalists are seen at work as they protest against media censorship during a parliament session in Kiev

    Posted: 10/2/2012 4:55:17 AM EST
    Journalists (top L) are seen at work as they protest against media censorship during a parliament session in Kiev October 2, 2012. The Ukrainian parliament on Tuesday scrapped a draft bill which would have made defamation a crime punishable by jail, a move the opposition and media had feared was a step towards censorship before a parliamentary election later this month. The banner reads: '"Stop the defamation law". REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
  •  - Journalists are seen at work as they protest against media censorship during a parliament session in Kiev

    Journalists are seen at work as they protest against media censorship during a parliament session in Kiev

    Posted: 10/2/2012 4:55:17 AM EST
    Journalists are seen at work as they protest against media censorship during a parliament session in Kiev October 2, 2012. The Ukrainian parliament on Tuesday scrapped a draft bill which would have made defamation a crime punishable by jail, a move the opposition and media had feared was a step towards censorship before a parliamentary election later this month. The banner reads: '"Stop the defamation law". REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
  •  - Opposition supporters shout slogans during a rally protesting against media censorship in Kiev

    Opposition supporters shout slogans during a rally protesting against media censorship in Kiev

    Posted: 9/19/2012 7:48:48 AM EST
    Opposition supporters shout slogans in front of a placard showing former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko during a rally protesting against media censorship in Kiev September 8, 2012. REUTERS/Anatolii Stepanov
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              Ukrainian journalists hold up placards, left and right, as they stage a protest against censorship by the government during President Viktor Yanukovych's speech at a respected newspaper

    Ukrainian journalists hold up placards, left and right, as they stage a protest against censorship by the government during President Viktor Yanukovych's speech at a respected newspaper

    Posted: 9/3/2012 10:13:24 AM EST
    Ukrainian journalists hold up placards, left and right, as they stage a protest against censorship by the government during President Viktor Yanukovych's speech at a respected newspaper conference in Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, Sept. 3, 2012. A group of leading Ukrainian journalists interrupted President Viktor Yanukovych’s speech at a newspaper conference Monday to protest government censorship, amid concerns of waning press freedoms in this ex-Soviet nation About a dozen reporters rose from their seats and held up posters reading “Stop Censorship” and “Media Oligarchs Serve the Authorities,” upsetting Yanukovych’s opening statement at the annual World Newspaper Congress.(AP Photo)
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              Ukrainian journalists stage a protest against censorship by the government during President Viktor Yanukovych's speech at a respected newspaper conference  in Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, Sep

    Ukrainian journalists stage a protest against censorship by the government during President Viktor Yanukovych's speech at a respected newspaper conference in Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, Sep

    Posted: 9/3/2012 10:13:24 AM EST
    Ukrainian journalists stage a protest against censorship by the government during President Viktor Yanukovych's speech at a respected newspaper conference in Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, Sept. 3, 2012. A group of leading Ukrainian journalists interrupted President Viktor Yanukovych’s speech at a newspaper conference Monday to protest government censorship, amid concerns of waning press freedoms in this ex-Soviet nation About a dozen reporters rose from their seats and held up posters reading “Stop Censorship” and “Media Oligarchs Serve the Authorities,” upsetting Yanukovych’s opening statement at the annual World Newspaper Congress. (AP Photo)
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    Posted: 6/19/2012 5:50:46 AM EST
    In this Sunday, June 10, 2012 photo, a man buys a weekly news journal at a roadside newspaper stand in Yangon, Myanmar. The country's mushrooming media is poised at the crossroads. Media censorship is due to end this month. But journalists fret that the censorship may be replaced by new kinds of repression, including crackdowns - after the fact - over stories that previously would simply never have been published. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)
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    Posted: 6/19/2012 5:50:46 AM EST
    In this Sunday, June 10, 2012 photo, a woman reads a weekly news journal with a headline of Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in Yangon, Myanmar. The country's mushrooming media is poised at the crossroads. Media censorship is due to end this month. But journalists fret that the censorship may be replaced by new kinds of repression, including crackdowns - after the fact - over stories that previously would simply never have been published. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)
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    Posted: 6/19/2012 5:50:46 AM EST
    In this Saturday, June 9, 2012 photo, a Myanmar graphic designer works on a design for their weekly "7Day Journal" at the office in Yangon, Myanmar. The country's mushrooming media is poised at the crossroads. Media censorship is due to end this month. But journalists fret that the censorship may be replaced by new kinds of repression, including crackdowns - after the fact - over stories that previously would simply never have been published. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)
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    Posted: 6/19/2012 5:50:45 AM EST
    In this Saturday, June 9, 2012 photo, "7Days Journal" employees check copies of the weekly at their office in Yangon, Myanmar. The country's mushrooming media is poised at the crossroads. Media censorship is due to end this month. But journalists fret that the censorship may be replaced by new kinds of repression, including crackdowns - after the fact - over stories that previously would simply never have been published. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)
  •  - To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    Posted: 6/13/2012 10:23:38 AM EST
    Journalists carry signs demanding freedom of press and expression during a demonstration against the violations of the security services towards the press and journalists outside the Council of the Press and Publication in Khartoum May 16, 2012. Sudan ranks 170th of 179th in a global press freedom index compiled by Reporters Without Borders, a media watchdog. Reporters in Sudan have long known that criticising the president or writing about official corruption could bring a beating, or jail. Official censorship ensured journalists knew exactly where the lines were. But censorship was abolished in 2009, and the secession of South Sudan a year ago and recent border fighting with the new nation has worsened the situation for press freedom. The government says press freedom is guaranteed in Sudan's constitution and that reporters face no problems if they comply with the law. Picture taken May 16, 2012. To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags:
  •  - To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    Posted: 6/13/2012 10:23:11 AM EST
    Journalists carry signs demanding freedom of press and expression during a demonstration against the violations of the security services towards the press and journalists outside the Council of the Press and Publication in Khartoum May 16, 2012. Sudan ranks 170th of 179th in a global press freedom index compiled by Reporters Without Borders, a media watchdog. Reporters in Sudan have long known that criticising the president or writing about official corruption could bring a beating, or jail. Official censorship ensured journalists knew exactly where the lines were. But censorship was abolished in 2009, and the secession of South Sudan a year ago and recent border fighting with the new nation has worsened the situation for press freedom. The government says press freedom is guaranteed in Sudan's constitution and that reporters face no problems if they comply with the law. Picture taken May 16, 2012. To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags:
  •  - To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    Posted: 6/13/2012 10:22:45 AM EST
    Journalists carry signs demanding freedom of press and expression during a demonstration against the violations of the security services towards the press and journalists outside the Council of the Press and Publication in Khartoum May 16, 2012. Sudan ranks 170th of 179th in a global press freedom index compiled by Reporters Without Borders, a media watchdog. Reporters in Sudan have long known that criticising the president or writing about official corruption could bring a beating, or jail. Official censorship ensured journalists knew exactly where the lines were. But censorship was abolished in 2009, and the secession of South Sudan a year ago and recent border fighting with the new nation has worsened the situation for press freedom. The government says press freedom is guaranteed in Sudan's constitution and that reporters face no problems if they comply with the law. Picture taken May 16, 2012. To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags:
  •  - To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    Posted: 6/13/2012 10:22:13 AM EST
    A journalist carries a sign demanding freedom of press and expression during a demonstration against the violations of the security services towards the press and journalists outside the Council of the Press and Publication in Khartoum May 16, 2012. Sudan ranks 170th of 179th in a global press freedom index compiled by Reporters Without Borders, a media watchdog. Reporters in Sudan have long known that criticising the president or writing about official corruption could bring a beating, or jail. Official censorship ensured journalists knew exactly where the lines were. But censorship was abolished in 2009, and the secession of South Sudan a year ago and recent border fighting with the new nation has worsened the situation for press freedom. The government says press freedom is guaranteed in Sudan's constitution and that reporters face no problems if they comply with the law. Picture taken May 16, 2012. To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN -
  •  - To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/

    Posted: 6/13/2012 10:20:15 AM EST
    Veteran Sudanese journalist Mahjoub Mohamed Saleh, editor of Sudan's oldest newspaper Al-Ayam, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his office in Khartoum June 4, 2012. Reflecting on a journalism career in Sudan which began in 1949 when Britain still ruled Sudan, Saleh said that he cannot remember a time when there were so many "red lines" - invisible boundaries that the media crosses at its peril. Reporters in Sudan have long known that criticising the president or writing about official corruption could bring a beating, or jail. Official censorship ensured journalists knew exactly where the lines were. But censorship was abolished in 2009, and the secession of South Sudan a year ago and recent border fighting with the new nation has worsened the situation for press freedom. The government says press freedom is guaranteed in Sudan's constitution and that reporters face no problems if they comply with the law. Picture taken June 4, 2012. To match Feature SUDAN-NEWSPAPERS/
  •  - A child wears a paper mask depicting Guy Fawkes during a protest by Anonymous India against laws they say gives the government control over censorship of Internet usage in Mumbai

    A child wears a paper mask depicting Guy Fawkes during a protest by Anonymous India against laws they say gives the government control over censorship of Internet usage in Mumbai

    Posted: 6/9/2012 10:04:24 AM EST
    A child wears a paper mask depicting Guy Fawkes during a protest by Anonymous India against laws they say gives the government control over censorship of Internet usage in Mumbai, June 9, 2012. Anonymous India is associated with the international hacker group Anonymous whose previous targets have included high profile targets. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Protesters from the Anonymous India group of hackers wear Guy Fawkes masks as they protest against laws they say gives the government control over censorship of internet usage in Mumbai

    Protesters from the Anonymous India group of hackers wear Guy Fawkes masks as they protest against laws they say gives the government control over censorship of internet usage in Mumbai

    Posted: 6/9/2012 10:02:11 AM EST
    Protesters from the Anonymous India group of hackers wear Guy Fawkes masks as they protest against laws they say gives the government control over censorship of internet usage in Mumbai, June 9, 2012. Anonymous India is associated with the internationa hacker group Anonymous whose previous targets have included high profile targets. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
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    Posted: 6/6/2012 11:55:47 AM EST
    FILE - In this March 23, 2010 file photo, flowers are placed on the Google logo outside Google China headquarters in Beijing, China. Google has fired a new salvo in a censorship battle with Beijing by adding a feature that suggests alternatives for search terms that might result in blocked results. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
  •  - Chiranuch, a Thai website editor, leaves the Bangkok Criminal Court in Bangkok

    Chiranuch, a Thai website editor, leaves the Bangkok Criminal Court in Bangkok

    Posted: 5/30/2012 2:59:45 AM EST
    Chiranuch Premchaiporn, a Thai website editor, leaves the Bangkok Criminal Court in Bangkok May 30, 2012. Chiranuch was found guilty on Wednesday of insulting the monarchy but was given a suspended jail sentence, a light punishment in a high-profile case that has renewed the debate over strict royal censorship laws. REUTERS/Kerek Wongsa (THAILAND - Tags: MEDIA CRIME LAW POLITICS)
  •  - Chiranuch, a Thai website editor, leaves the Bangkok Criminal Court

    Chiranuch, a Thai website editor, leaves the Bangkok Criminal Court

    Posted: 5/30/2012 2:58:05 AM EST
    Chiranuch Premchaiporn, a Thai website editor, leaves the Bangkok Criminal Court in Bangkok May 30, 2012. Chiranuch was found guilty on Wednesday of insulting the monarchy but was given a suspended jail sentence, a light punishment in a high-profile case that has renewed the debate over strict royal censorship laws. REUTERS/Kerek Wongsa (THAILAND - Tags: MEDIA CRIME LAW POLITICS)