Cartels Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 2/14/2012 9:35:47 PM EST
    Guatemala's President Otto Pérez Molina answers a question during a news conference with El Salvador's President Mauricio Funes, where they addressed issues related to regional security and how to coordinate their fight against organized crime in Guatemala City, Monday Feb. 13, 2012. Perez has blamed the drug cartels for the high levels of violence in his country of 13 million overrun by gangs and the Mexican cartels, with a rate of 41 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants, nearly three times that of neighboring Mexico. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
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    Posted: 2/14/2012 12:05:47 AM EST
    Guatemala's President Otto Pérez Molina answers a question during a joint news conference with El Salvador's President Mauricio Funes, where they addressed issues related to regional security and how to coordinate their fight against organized crime in Guatemala City, Monday Feb. 13, 2012. Perez has blamed the drug cartels for the high levels of violence in his country of 13 million overrun by gangs and the Mexican cartels, with a rate of 41 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants, nearly three times that of neighboring Mexico. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
  •  - Police stand near a motorcycle helmet containing a human head and topped with a foam hat with the writing "Happy 2012" placed outside a house in a residential area in Morelos

    Police stand near a motorcycle helmet containing a human head and topped with a foam hat with the writing "Happy 2012" placed outside a house in a residential area in Morelos

    Posted: 1/17/2012 10:54:04 AM EST
    Police stand near a motorcycle helmet containing a human head and topped with a foam hat with the writing "Happy 2012" placed outside a house in a residential area in Morelos January 16, 2012. More than 46,000 people have died in drug-related violence since Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched an army-led crackdown on drug cartels after taking office five years ago. REUTERS/Margarito Perez Retana (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - Police stand near a motorcycle helmet containing a human head and topped with a foam hat with the writing "Happy 2012" placed outside a house in a residential area in Morelos

    Police stand near a motorcycle helmet containing a human head and topped with a foam hat with the writing "Happy 2012" placed outside a house in a residential area in Morelos

    Posted: 1/17/2012 10:11:41 AM EST
    Police stand near a motorcycle helmet containing a human head and topped with a foam hat with the writing "Happy 2012" placed outside a house in a residential area in Morelos January 16, 2012. More than 46,000 people have died in drug-related violence since Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched an army-led crackdown on drug cartels after taking office five years ago. REUTERS/Margarito Perez Retana (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - New police officers take oath during their graduation at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    New police officers take oath during their graduation at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    Posted: 1/16/2012 2:33:31 PM EST
    New police officers take oath during their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela January 16, 2012. 376 police officers will graduate after Costa Rica's parliament recently approved a new security tax on business, as part of efforts to improve funding for a crackdown on drug cartels local media reported. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
  •  - New police officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    New police officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    Posted: 1/16/2012 2:31:11 PM EST
    New police officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela January 16, 2012. 376 police officers will graduate after Costa Rica's parliament recently approved a new security tax on business, as part of efforts to improve funding for a crackdown on drug cartels local media reported. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
  •  - New police officers attend their graduation at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    New police officers attend their graduation at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    Posted: 1/16/2012 2:23:54 PM EST
    New police officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela January 16, 2012. 376 police officers will graduate after Costa Rica's parliament recently approved a new security tax on business, as part of efforts to improve funding for a crackdown on drug cartels local media reported. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
  •  - New police officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    New police officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela

    Posted: 1/16/2012 2:21:37 PM EST
    New police officers attend their graduation ceremony at the Juan Santamaria square in Alajuela January 16, 2012. 376 police officers will graduate after Costa Rica's parliament recently approved a new security tax on business, as part of efforts to improve funding for a crackdown on drug cartels local media reported. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
  •  - A candle and a pair of shoes with a name tag of its owner, a victim of the drug war, are arranged at a square in Monterrey

    A candle and a pair of shoes with a name tag of its owner, a victim of the drug war, are arranged at a square in Monterrey

    Posted: 1/15/2012 11:30:56 PM EST
    A candle and a pair of shoes with a name tag of its owner, a victim of the drug war, are arranged at a square in Monterrey January 15, 2012. More than 46,000 people have died in drug-related violence since Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched an army-led crackdown on the cartels after taking office five years ago. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW DRUGS SOCIETY)
  •  - A woman places a Mexican flag next to shoes belonging to victims of the drug war at a square in Monterrey

    A woman places a Mexican flag next to shoes belonging to victims of the drug war at a square in Monterrey

    Posted: 1/15/2012 11:27:56 PM EST
    A woman places a Mexican flag next to shoes belonging to victims of the drug war at a square in Monterrey January 15, 2012. More than 46,000 people have died in drug-related violence since Mexico's President Felipe Calderon launched an army-led crackdown on the cartels after taking office five years ago. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY DRUGS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
  •  - Man writes on a paper mache gun during a protest outside Chapultepec castle in Mexico City

    Man writes on a paper mache gun during a protest outside Chapultepec castle in Mexico City

    Posted: 10/27/2011 12:35:06 PM EST
    A man writes "Fast," in reference to the "Fast and Furious" operation that allowed guns to be smuggled to Mexican drug cartels from the U.S., on a paper mache gun during a protest outside Chapultepec castle in Mexico City October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Bernardo Montoya
  •  - Man writes on a paper mache gun during a protest outside Chapultepec castle in Mexico City

    Man writes on a paper mache gun during a protest outside Chapultepec castle in Mexico City

    Posted: 10/14/2011 10:51:58 PM EST
    A man writes "Fast," in reference to the "Fast and Furious" operation that allowed guns to be smuggled to Mexican drug cartels from the U.S., on a paper mache gun during a protest outside Chapultepec castle in Mexico City October 14, 2011. Mexico's President Felipe Calderon and human rights activist Javier Sicilia met at Chapultepec castle for another round of talks on the drug war that has exploded since Calderon sent army troops into the fight when he took office in late 2006. REUTERS/Bernardo Montoya (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS DRUGS SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST)
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    Posted: 10/7/2011 11:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2011 file photo, state police secure an area where three men were killed after gunmen opened fire in the Pacific resort city of Acapulco, Mexico, Sunday Oct. 2, 2011. The brutal public killings that began about five years ago have worsened as Mexican drug cartels try to one-up each other in their quest to scare off rivals, authorities and would-be informers _ and still shock Mexicans increasingly accustomed to the gory spectacles. (AP Photo/Bernandino Hernandez, File)
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    Posted: 10/7/2011 11:05:46 PM EST
    FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2011 file photo, relatives weep after gunmen opened fire on a taxi killing the driver and the passenger in the Pacific resort city of Acapulco, Mexico. The brutal public killings that began about five years ago have worsened as Mexican drug cartels try to one-up each other in their quest to scare off rivals, authorities and would-be informers _ and still shock Mexicans increasingly accustomed to the gory spectacles. (AP Photo/Bernandino Hernandez, File)
  •  - To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 11:04:07 PM EST
    Soldiers patrol a street in Coban, some 200 km (124 miles) northeast Guatemala City, September 9, 2011. Mexican cartels working with local gangs control around 40 percent of Guatemala, U.S. military experts say, a massive challenge for a new president set to be elected in November and a serious worry for Mexico and the United States. To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (GUATEMALA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 11:02:17 PM EST
    Soldiers patrol a street in Coban, some 200 km (124 miles) northeast Guatemala City, September 9, 2011. Mexican cartels working with local gangs control around 40 percent of Guatemala, U.S. military experts say, a massive challenge for a new president set to be elected in November and a serious worry for Mexico and the United States. To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (GUATEMALA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 11:00:58 PM EST
    Guatemalan soldiers patrol a street in Coban, some 200 km (124 miles) northeast Guatemala City, September 9, 2011. Mexican cartels working with local gangs control around 40 percent of Guatemala, U.S. military experts say, a massive challenge for a new president set to be elected in November and a serious worry for Mexico and the United States. To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (Guatemala - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 10:58:23 PM EST
    Police officers stand guard while others search a house in Coban, some 200 km (124 miles) northeast Guatemala City, September 9, 2011. Mexican cartels working with local gangs control around 40 percent of Guatemala, U.S. military experts say, a massive challenge for a new president set to be elected in November and a serious worry for Mexico and the United States. To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (GUATEMALA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 10:56:17 PM EST
    A soldier stands guard on a street in Coban, some 200 km (124 miles) northeast Guatemala City, September 9, 2011. Mexican cartels working with local gangs control around 40 percent of Guatemala, U.S. military experts say, a massive challenge for a new president set to be elected in November and a serious worry for Mexico and the United States. To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (Guatemala - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
  •  - To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/

    Posted: 10/2/2011 10:52:58 PM EST
    School children walk past police officers standing guard on a street in Coban, some 200 km (124 miles) northeast Guatemala City, September 9, 2011. Mexican cartels working with local gangs control around 40 percent of Guatemala, U.S. military experts say, a massive challenge for a new president set to be elected in November and a serious worry for Mexico and the United States. To match GUATEMALA-DRUGS/ Picture taken September 9, 2011. REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez (GUATEMALA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)


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