Carbon Dioxide Photos on Townhall

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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, Bergur Sigfusson, the CarbFix experiment's technical manager, inspects a test well at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. CarbFix's scientists will separate carbon dioxide from the volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, University of Iceland Ph.D. candidate Iwona Galeczka conducts indoor experiments simulating the CarbFix test planned to begin in September, in Reykjavik, Iceland. CarbFix scientists, at a nearby geothermal plant, will separate carbon dioxide from a volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. Galeczka's key equipment, a plug flow reactor, is the vertical object on the right. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, geologist Sigurdur Reynir Gislason, the CarbFix experiment's chief scientist, holds examples of basalt rock, left, and limestone in his office at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik, Iceland. At a nearby geothermal plant, CarbFix scientists will separate carbon dioxide from a volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    This July 28, 2011, photo shows part of one of four giant turbines inside Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant, fed by steam from the surrounding volcanic field, in Reykjavik, Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from Hellisheidi's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011, photo a complex of pipes, ducts and valves connects to giant turbines inside Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from the steam in this volcanic field and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, giant ducts carry superheated steam from within a volcanic field to the turbines at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from the steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:48 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011, photo, superheated steam laden with carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide billow from a test well in the volcanic field at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. In the CarbFix experiment, scientists will separate out the CO2 and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:47 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, Bergur Sigfusson, the CarbFix experiment's technical manager, checks a valve at a test well at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. CarbFix's scientists will separate carbon dioxide from the volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
  •  -
    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:47 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, giant ducts carry superheated steam from within a volcanic field to the turbines at Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. Scientists in the CarbFix experiment will separate carbon dioxide from the steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 8/28/2011 4:40:46 PM EST
    In this July 28, 2011 photo, Bergur Sigfusson, the CarbFix experiment's technical manager, surveys Reykjavik Energy's Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. CarbFix's scientists will separate carbon dioxide from the volcanic field's steam and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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    Posted: 7/10/2011 6:05:48 PM EST
    In this photo taken Friday, July 8, 2011, smoke bellows out of chimney stacks at BlueScope Steel's steelworks at Port Kembla, south of Sydney, Australia. Australia will force its 500 worst polluters to pay 23 Australian dollars ($25) for every ton of carbon dioxide they emit, with the government promising to compensate households hit with higher power bills under a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions unveiled Sunday, July 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)
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    Posted: 7/10/2011 6:05:48 PM EST
    In this photo taken Friday, July 8, 2011, smoke bellows from a chimney stack at BlueScope Steel's steelworks at Port Kembla, south of Sydney, Australia. Australia will force its 500 worst polluters to pay 23 Australian dollars ($25) for every ton of carbon dioxide they emit, with the government promising to compensate households hit with higher power bills under a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions unveiled Sunday, July 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)
  •  - A waitress smiles as she works under a roof covered in solar panels in the lobby of China's first solar-powered hotel in the city of Baoding, Hebei Province

    A waitress smiles as she works under a roof covered in solar panels in the lobby of China's first solar-powered hotel in the city of Baoding, Hebei Province

    Posted: 6/20/2011 8:11:03 AM EST
    A waitress smiles as she works under a roof covered in solar panels in the lobby of China's first solar-powered hotel in the city of Baoding, Hebei Province June 20, 2011. The 291-room hotel boasts that the photoelectric glass covering the exterior of the building can produce the amount of power per year that is equivalent to 270 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions or 104 tonnes of coal. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
  •  - Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Posted: 5/5/2011 4:48:28 AM EST
    A boy uses a magnifying glass to look at a screen showing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions to generate electricity in various ways, at a nuclear museum beside the Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, May 5, 2011. Chubu Electric Power Co said it is not committed to its presumed July restart of the No.3 reactor at its Hamaoka plant in central Japan while comments by the area's prefectural governor suggest political obstacles may delay the restart. The Hamaoka plant, 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Tokyo, sits near an active earthquake zone that the government has forecast carries an 87 percent chance of producing a magnitude-8 or stronger earthquake in the next 30 years. The screen showing (in a clockwise) coal-fired thermal power, nuclear power, oil-fired thermal power, wind power, gas-fired power generation and water power. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY POLITICS)
  •  - Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Posted: 5/5/2011 4:48:28 AM EST
    A boy uses a magnifying glass to look at a screen showing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions to generate electricity in various ways, at a nuclear museum beside the Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, May 5, 2011. Chubu Electric Power Co said it is not committed to its presumed July restart of the No.3 reactor at its Hamaoka plant in central Japan while comments by the area's prefectural governor suggest political obstacles may delay the restart. The Hamaoka plant, 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Tokyo, sits near an active earthquake zone that the government has forecast carries an 87 percent chance of producing a magnitude-8 or stronger earthquake in the next 30 years. The screen showing (in a clockwise) coal-fired thermal power, nuclear power, oil-fired thermal power, wind power, gas-fired power generation and water power. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY POLITICS)
  •  - Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Posted: 5/5/2011 4:48:28 AM EST
    A boy uses a magnifying glass to look at a screen showing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions to generate electricity in various ways, at a nuclear museum beside the Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, May 5, 2011. Chubu Electric Power Co said it is not committed to its presumed July restart of the No.3 reactor at its Hamaoka plant in central Japan while comments by the area's prefectural governor suggest political obstacles may delay the restart. The Hamaoka plant, 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Tokyo, sits near an active earthquake zone that the government has forecast carries an 87 percent chance of producing a magnitude-8 or stronger earthquake in the next 30 years. The screen showing (in a clockwise) coal-fired thermal power, nuclear power, oil-fired thermal power, wind power, gas-fired power generation and water power. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY POLITICS)
  •  - Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Posted: 5/5/2011 4:48:28 AM EST
    A boy uses a magnifying glass to look at a screen showing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions to generate electricity in various ways, at a nuclear museum beside the Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, May 5, 2011. Chubu Electric Power Co said it is not committed to its presumed July restart of the No.3 reactor at its Hamaoka plant in central Japan while comments by the area's prefectural governor suggest political obstacles may delay the restart. The Hamaoka plant, 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Tokyo, sits near an active earthquake zone that the government has forecast carries an 87 percent chance of producing a magnitude-8 or stronger earthquake in the next 30 years. The screen showing (in a clockwise) coal-fired thermal power, nuclear power, oil-fired thermal power, wind power, gas-fired power generation and water power. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY POLITICS)
  •  - Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Posted: 5/5/2011 4:48:28 AM EST
    A boy uses a magnifying glass to look at a screen showing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions to generate electricity in various ways, at a nuclear museum beside the Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, May 5, 2011. Chubu Electric Power Co said it is not committed to its presumed July restart of the No.3 reactor at its Hamaoka plant in central Japan while comments by the area's prefectural governor suggest political obstacles may delay the restart. The Hamaoka plant, 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Tokyo, sits near an active earthquake zone that the government has forecast carries an 87 percent chance of producing a magnitude-8 or stronger earthquake in the next 30 years. The screen showing (in a clockwise) coal-fired thermal power, nuclear power, oil-fired thermal power, wind power, gas-fired power generation and water power. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY POLITICS)
  •  - Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Posted: 5/5/2011 4:48:28 AM EST
    A boy uses a magnifying glass to look at a screen showing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions to generate electricity in various ways, at a nuclear museum beside the Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, May 5, 2011. Chubu Electric Power Co said it is not committed to its presumed July restart of the No.3 reactor at its Hamaoka plant in central Japan while comments by the area's prefectural governor suggest political obstacles may delay the restart. The Hamaoka plant, 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Tokyo, sits near an active earthquake zone that the government has forecast carries an 87 percent chance of producing a magnitude-8 or stronger earthquake in the next 30 years. The screen showing (in a clockwise) coal-fired thermal power, nuclear power, oil-fired thermal power, wind power, gas-fired power generation and water power. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY POLITICS)
  •  - Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Boy uses magnifying glass to look at screen at a nuclear museum beside Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki

    Posted: 5/5/2011 4:48:28 AM EST
    A boy uses a magnifying glass to look at a screen showing the amount of carbon dioxide emissions to generate electricity in various ways, at a nuclear museum beside the Chubu Electric Power's Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, May 5, 2011. Chubu Electric Power Co said it is not committed to its presumed July restart of the No.3 reactor at its Hamaoka plant in central Japan while comments by the area's prefectural governor suggest political obstacles may delay the restart. The Hamaoka plant, 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Tokyo, sits near an active earthquake zone that the government has forecast carries an 87 percent chance of producing a magnitude-8 or stronger earthquake in the next 30 years. The screen showing (in a clockwise) coal-fired thermal power, nuclear power, oil-fired thermal power, wind power, gas-fired power generation and water power. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY POLITICS)


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